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Taming a 23 yr old TB

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    12-31-2012, 10:46 AM
  #21
Foal
Since everyone seems to be missing what I'm saying I'll just do this my way. TB are not crazy, high strung, or unusable for things other than racing. It doesn't take a miracle worker to turn them into quiet pleasure horses. I have a whole barn full of ex racers to prove it. In fact, nearly all of our horses are used in programs with children and people with disabilities. The horse I'm speaking of is one of the best for this even. She simply pulls and takes a loose rein as the invite to pick up speed. All this advise makes me glad I have this horse and not someone who believes the horribly wrong stereotype of TBs.
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    12-31-2012, 10:52 AM
  #22
Showing
Who here has stated a 'horribly wrong stereotype' of TBs? Nobody, to my knowledge. You're getting your panties in a wad over nothing but your own imagination.

I like TBs. I own one, and if I'm lucky enough I'll own another at some point in my life.

Like any breed, there are some who are more high strung than others. That's not a stereotype, that's merely a FACT.

You're
the one who initially stated you CAN'T ride this horse on a loose rein, now you're stating you can. So which is it? Does she jig, jog, and want to run all the time, or is she a great, wonderful, quiet, trail horse and schoolie? If you'd stop changing your story, maybe we could actually give you some decent advice.
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    12-31-2012, 10:55 AM
  #23
Green Broke
Sounds like she needs to learn to give her jaw to the half halt. She has been trained to bore into the bit and balance as a race horse.

Training a horse to give her jaw to the bit takes a lot of give and release.. sensitivity on the rider's part. This means you squeeze your hand closed making contact and then releasing. I release even if she does not. At first she may be sort of like squeezing against a board.. but if you ask gently and are insistent, most horses will relax their jaw (if only for a moment) at which point you immediately release. Then drop the reins and pet the horse (start all this standing still). Rinse and repeat a few (like 3-4) times.

A little every day. You can even do this standing on the ground.

If you do this on the ground you may see her start to blink just before and as she releases her jaw. This may sound funny.. but the blinking seems to be associated with the horse thinking about what is going on. Sort of like the hard drive light on a computer... LOL
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    12-31-2012, 10:58 AM
  #24
Green Broke
FWIW, I love Thoroughbreds. They are wonderfully athletic and sensitive. Some are hot.. and those you need to be even more in tune with.

My favorite horse breed is the Thoroughbred, both on and off the track.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:01 AM
  #25
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadie00994    
Now she feels good physically again. But how do I tell her she's an old lady and she should act like one? Lol
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Easy on us older ones!
Some old ladies act like they are and others not so much! Even horses. I have known "old" ladies (actually pushing 80) who were still out riding to hounds fox hunting..

Your Thoroughbred, assuming she is sound, may be the same way.

"Old" has more to do with mileage than age!
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    12-31-2012, 11:16 AM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
Easy on us older ones!
Some old ladies act like they are and others not so much! Even horses. I have known "old" ladies (actually pushing 80) who were still out riding to hounds fox hunting..

Your Thoroughbred, assuming she is sound, may be the same way.

"Old" has more to do with mileage than age!
This reminds me of our 19 yr old arthritic warmblood mix mare (who has a healthy dose of TB in her background). With the help of good farrier care, great supplements, and regular work she still believes that she's plenty young to be carrying on like a 3 year old.

I was out of town for a bit over a week during the holidays and just got back out to the barn yesterday. She was so wound up that she spent a fair while bucking, jumping, and generally having a heyday on the longe line (she's typically very well mannered on the longe). Eventually she remembered that she ought to act a bit more like a lady. I love my crazy mare.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:32 AM
  #27
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
Sounds like she needs to learn to give her jaw to the half halt. She has been trained to bore into the bit and balance as a race horse.

Training a horse to give her jaw to the bit takes a lot of give and release.. sensitivity on the rider's part. This means you squeeze your hand closed making contact and then releasing. I release even if she does not. At first she may be sort of like squeezing against a board.. but if you ask gently and are insistent, most horses will relax their jaw (if only for a moment) at which point you immediately release. Then drop the reins and pet the horse (start all this standing still). Rinse and repeat a few (like 3-4) times.

A little every day. You can even do this standing on the ground.

If you do this on the ground you may see her start to blink just before and as she releases her jaw. This may sound funny.. but the blinking seems to be associated with the horse thinking about what is going on. Sort of like the hard drive light on a computer... LOL

Thank you kindly for actually giving me advise worth trying. I do appreciate it.
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    12-31-2012, 12:05 PM
  #28
Green Broke
The object is to help the horse by helping the person handling her (or so I thought). BTW the squeezing of your hand should be sort of like squeezing a sponge and releasing.

Let me know how this goes. I will be interested in the outcome.

Another thing you can do (from the ground) is to put a fat loose ring (hollow) snaffle on her. Stand next to and slightly to one side of her so you are face to face. Hold each hand on each snaffle ring.. and twist one side up and the other side down (gentle pressure) and see if she gives her jaw some. This action often helps a horse to know what a soft, moist, mouth is. If you do this right she should soften her jaw, chew some on the bit and arch her neck.. and she may even raise the root of her neck.

Don't do a lot of this.. just try it and see (don't get in a fight either).
     
    12-31-2012, 04:48 PM
  #29
Foal
Just because a horse has been successful or raced a lot does NOT mean they will never be relaxed, calm riding horses. Far from the truth! In fact, many older runners are well loved on the track because of their laid back nature.

Sadie I totally get what you are saying. Mine is very similar-totally laid back 99% of the time and incredibly responsive, but he does tend to lean into the bit and once he gets rolling there is little chance of stopping him, it's literally like pulling against a wall.

I've found bit wise, less is more. He goes great in a hackamore and best in a neck collar with no rein pressure. If he doesn't have that pressure, there is nothing for him to lean against. How does your mare turn? I would work on bending ALOT, get her really flexible and loose, help break up that "pull against you" because she will have a much harder time bracing when you are only pulling on one side.

Do tons of serpentines, circles, figure 8's. Don't let her get to the point of going faster or being able to run. Lots of transitions. Even if you only trot a couple strides, then back to the walk. The trick is to change things and stop her from getting a chance at going faster or leaning against you, before she even thinks about doing it. Eventually she will become much more responsive and attentive to what you are asking for. Don't forget to praise her when she's doing good!

With her history and lack of proper training, you will have a long road ahead of you retraining all those bad habits out of her. Best of luck, it IS possible, just going to take lots of patience. Don't let anybody discourage you about her being an crazy, untrainable OTTB either People who think those kinds of things have no idea what they are talking about.
     
    12-31-2012, 05:33 PM
  #30
Showing
I rode a horse a few times who's owner like to show off. The horse wasn't a TB but he wore big spurs and made it prance at all 3 gaits. When I rode it along with another rider, we'd try to walk but his jigging was getting annoying. If I touched the bridle his nose flew up. Finally in desperation I turned him around and made him stand. The other rider did the same. When he settled down we proceeded but we had to keep turning around and stopping. Finally the horse started to catch on and let down some.
     

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