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post #1 of 15 Old 10-21-2007, 08:24 AM Thread Starter
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tb problems

whenever I tighten my reins when I go into trot or if I do it at all my tb seems to start trotting before I ask as if tightening my reins is my cue for trot on is there any way to train him out of it or not? Any help is appreciated thanks
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post #2 of 15 Old 10-21-2007, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by cheethamz17
whenever I tighten my reins when I go into trot or if I do it at all my tb seems to start trotting before I ask as if tightening my reins is my cue for trot on is there any way to train him out of it or not? Any help is appreciated thanks
im not entirely sure but I will answer what I would do.

Try half halting when this happens. My mare gets like that once she has been for a run and gets excited. I give her a half halt and put my weight back in the saddle. This seems to calm her.

I know its not much help and there are people here that could probably give you more help than that. Fortunately, this is all I need to do to get her to come back a bit and wait for the aid or in most cases, a voice command.

Another thing that may or may not help...i had an ottb a few years ago who did the same thing and wouldnt respond to the half halt. While I taught him to get out of the habit, I kept my reins at a consistent length all the time. This way, he had to wait for the aid rather than take the tightening of the reins as a signal to go. Eventually he learnt that he couldnt trot until I asked him to. I don't know if this will be considered a good way to do it but he did learn without any harsh methods being applied. Good luck with him :)

P.s. Are you leaning forward in any way when doing it? Some ex-racehorses are sensitive to things like that. Maybe leaning your weight back as you tighten may help. I don't know, just a thought :)

"I whisper but my horse doesnt listen...So I yell!!...He still doesnt listen"


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post #3 of 15 Old 10-21-2007, 06:03 PM
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I had an OTTB with the same issue - as I believe that's how they are trained. We went back to lungeing and re-learning vocal commands for walk, trot, and canter. Then when I rode, I would repeat those commands and use your seat and legs to reinforce. It's going to take time and patience (of course, doesn't everything!!). As jazzyrider said, riding with steady hands that are very gentle is a good start. Really concentrate on using your seat and legs for cues.

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post #4 of 15 Old 10-21-2007, 10:40 PM
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Yes, same issue with an ottb. As everyone said, seat, balance and voice will be much more effective for you. The one I'm riding currently has been off the track for several years and he still does this, especially if he's keyed up. With him, I warm up walk/trot on a very loose rein and let him do large figures on a leading rein. Eventually he will come to my hands and I can take up the slack, but I have to let him relax first. Usually takes him only 10 minutes or so now.
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post #5 of 15 Old 10-22-2007, 09:32 AM
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I agree with everyone on the seat, balance and voice commands. But I also agree with her about the warming up on a loose rein and letting the horse come to your hands. I have a TB mare that's been off the track for a year, but luckily she never did this, infact she's really sensitive with her mouth and doesn't like pulling on it, but then again I wouldnt either if I was a horse...so it helps me ride with my body more so my hands.
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post #6 of 15 Old 10-23-2007, 03:31 PM
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I agree with everyone too! I have a mare tb ex racer. She never has given me this problem, in fact she doesn't like me to pull on her mouth so she walks. Voice commands are my favorite because eventually you don't need to pull on the reigns or anything.
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post #7 of 15 Old 10-23-2007, 05:25 PM
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Tricky but you can stop it.

Start with never ever shortening your reins for an unpwards transition. If you feel you want to trot but your rein's too long, shorten them and ride for a least a minute in walk as is first. Relax contact for the upward transition every time. Race horses are trained to run in to contact, rein is relaxed after race is over. A race horse that comes off the bit in a race is tired and will likely lose therefore it is really trained to go faster with the short rein.

If horse anticapates transition do a downwards one instead. You can change them but constistency is key.

Good luck
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post #8 of 15 Old 10-23-2007, 05:26 PM
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Tricky but you can stop it.

Start with never ever shortening your reins for an unpwards transition. If you feel you want to trot but your rein's too long, shorten them and ride for a least a minute in walk as is first. Relax contact for the upward transition every time. Race horses are trained to run in to contact, rein is relaxed after race is over. A race horse that comes off the bit in a race is tired and will likely lose therefore it is really trained to go faster with the short rein.

If horse anticapates transition do a downwards one instead. You can change them but constistency is key.

Good luck
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post #9 of 15 Old 10-23-2007, 05:26 PM
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Tricky but you can stop it.

Start with never ever shortening your reins for an unpwards transition. If you feel you want to trot but your rein's too long, shorten them and ride for a least a minute in walk as is first. Relax contact for the upward transition every time. Race horses are trained to run in to contact, rein is relaxed after race is over. A race horse that comes off the bit in a race is tired and will likely lose therefore it is really trained to go faster with the short rein.

If horse anticapates transition do a downwards one instead. You can change them but constistency is key.

Good luck
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post #10 of 15 Old 10-23-2007, 05:27 PM
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Tricky but you can stop it.

Start with never ever shortening your reins for an unpwards transition. If you feel you want to trot but your rein's too long, shorten them and ride for a least a minute in walk as is first. Relax contact for the upward transition every time. Race horses are trained to run in to contact, rein is relaxed after race is over. A race horse that comes off the bit in a race is tired and will likely lose therefore it is really trained to go faster with the short rein.

If horse anticapates transition do a downwards one instead. You can change them but constistency is key.

Good luck
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