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Teaching him not to kick?

This is a discussion on Teaching him not to kick? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        08-23-2012, 12:07 AM
      #21
    Banned
    I don't believe in leaving horses alone while eating, I tend to groom mine while he eats. I have no interest in his food, and I am no threat in taking in from him.

    If my horse kicked at me, I would knock the snot out of him. It's that simple.
         
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        08-23-2012, 12:09 AM
      #22
    Green Broke
    To the OP, if he lifts his leg step to the side and give a good kick to his belly. Use the top of your foot and not your toe, no way to actually hurt them that way but it sure does get their attention. Rubber boots work the best if you have them as they flop around and make all sorts of extra slapping sounds. Never ever let them get away with trying to kick without an immediate and harsh reaction. At the same time give a sharp "HEY!" or some other quick, one syllable word you like. Pretty quick all you have to do is say "HEY!" to get them to stop misbehaving.

    I don't agree with leaving them alone while eating. Best way to prevent food aggression with any animal is take their food away and give it back on your terms, not theirs. By not doing this you can end up with a very aggressive animal when food is involved and that is not safe. BTW, I also do it with my dogs.

    Jewelsb, do not let your horse turn his butt to you to begin with. Watch him closely and as soon as he even thinks about turning it in your direction, give him that same kick to the belly. Once their butt is pointed at you, you've already lost the battle because they can kick faster than you can with a lot more damage.

    That said, some animals are just rotten and dangerous. I was taught growing up there are to many good animals out there to put up with a bad one. If you can't stop the behavior get rid of your horse and go buy another one.
         
        08-23-2012, 12:12 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    I would do that with our mare but she is pregnant. I will use that advice in the future. I've actually had to kick my gelding in the belly the one time when he bucked and I had to bail. He never tried bucking again!
         
        08-23-2012, 12:15 AM
      #24
    Weanling
    My horse used to do this whenever he was groomed and we had the vet and chiropractor out to look at him. His saddle didn't fit and it was giving him back pain. The chiropractor said that he was associating the pain from the saddle with me because every time I saw him I would put the saddle on him. Therefore, when he saw me he would immediatly be on his guard. Also he tested positive for Lymes Disease. After he got a few chiropractor sessions, a new saddle and Doxy pills, he doesn't act sensitive any more :) The Lymes Disease can make them hyper sensitive to touch so- while I agree that kicking should NOT be tolerated- rule out health issues first. Other signs of Lymes are painful joints, spooking more than normal, and other behavior problems. With it being such a bad year for ticks- it can't hurt to have him tested
         
        08-23-2012, 12:15 AM
      #25
    Started
    The Amish are awful to horses - I work with a number of amish broke draft horses, poor things.

    That sounds like she got spooked and kicked him, spooked when he fell. I'd tie her to a ring on the side while cleaning her stall if she does that and repeatedly yield her hind end so she's lined up against the wall - that way she can't put her butt to you.
         
        08-23-2012, 12:19 AM
      #26
    Showing
    PunksTank Yelling isn't something horses understand. If a horse turns butt and threatens to kick, your kicking puts you at risk of great harm. Some horses may startle, others may throw a kick so fast you can't get out of the way. In the field I'll take a rope and follow an aggressive horse. If he turns butt I'll start swinging the rope in circles, to worry him. He'll move away and I'll continue to follow. As long as he's moseying along, the rope is still. My goal is to get him to watch me with both eyes. When his eyes are on me his heels are the farthest away. I watch his ears as they tell me what is going thro his mind. I am ready to be proactive should it come to that. In a box stall, I'll remain outside and use a lunge whip to tap the horse's hip in a rhythmical fashion that gets annoying. The horse will begin to move. Even the smallest movement of his hip away from me is rewarded with the tapping stopping. I will wait a few seconds and start again. He'll start searching for the right answer which is both eyes on me and his butt the other way. I will leave him alone at this point (his reward). I will return in a while and assess the progress. He may need a refresher but it won't last long. When he's facing me this time I will offer a treat. I won't say that that is the end of it as somewhere down the road he may try it again, as that what horses do, test. A quick refresher and then it's done for.
    Palomine likes this.
         
        08-23-2012, 12:21 AM
      #27
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ashsunnyeventer    
    My horse used to do this whenever he was groomed and we had the vet and chiropractor out to look at him. His saddle didn't fit and it was giving him back pain. Also he tested positive for Lymes Disease. After he got a few chiropractor sessions, a new saddle and Doxy pills, he doesn't act sensitive any more :) The Lymes Disease can make them hyper sensitive to touch so- while I agree that kicking should NOT be tolerated- rule out health issues first. Other signs of Lymes are painful joints, spooking more than normal, and other behavior problems. With it being such a bad year for ticks- it can't hurt to have him tested
    That's interesting, first time I've heard of a horse getting diagnosed with lymes disease. Guess I just assumed they didn't get it but now I know better. Have to admit ticks are not a huge problem here and lymes even less so though we do have some cases per year in people. I've only had one tick on me and found one on the floor boards of my pickup in 40+ years of playing outside.
         
        08-23-2012, 12:24 AM
      #28
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jewelsb    
    Ok I've had an issue where my horse has kicked out with his bum facing me and I had nothing in my hands to whap him with.
    You don't need anything to whack him with. You have arms and legs and your voice. My voice is the most terrifying thing in the world when I am peed off. All that's important is that your horse feels like he is in VERY serious trouble.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    PunksTank Yelling isn't something horses understand.
    They understand tone and aggression. I certainly think using your voice is something that works. Not in using words, but bad noises.




    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PunksTank    
    The Amish are awful to horses - I work with a number of amish broke draft horses, poor things.
    SOME Amish are. Same as some none Amish are awful to animals too.
    PunksTank likes this.
         
        08-23-2012, 12:24 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    Thanks for all the helpful advice! I will work with them both on yielding. I never really got that before. Didn't know how to get them to face me at all times. Sound like that would help with the kicking issue.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-23-2012, 12:28 AM
      #30
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jewelsb    
    I would do that with our mare but she is pregnant. I will use that advice in the future. I've actually had to kick my gelding in the belly the one time when he bucked and I had to bail. He never tried bucking again!
    Not a training method I really like but some people train with poking their butt with the fork. A slighltly better take is just hold the fork out and let them hit it as they swing their butt around. I know it works and might for you. I personally avoid two things, one is using anything that can actually break skin. Second is using aids like a whip or fork because they can quickly tell if you have it with you or not. I prefer using nothing but my own body because other than your head, you can't leave any of it behind by mistake.

    I should of said in my previous post. Always leave yourself and out when punishing a horse. While most go away from punishment they can still run you over if you're in a corner with no way out. Also you run into the occasional fighter and then you are in real deep doo doo without an out.
    PunksTank likes this.
         

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