teaching a horse to drag logs/small trees to the barn - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 20 Old 01-25-2010, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,266
• Horses: 1
teaching a horse to drag logs/small trees to the barn

I was thinking of teaching Major to drag logs up to the barn. It's winter time and he's getting fat and lazy. Also, he seems more settled the more work he does and anything I can desensitize him to is beneficial. I don't want to do anything to mess him up or cause myself problems....so if you think this is a bad idea PLEASE SAY SO!!!! If it's ok to try it then here are my ideas:
I was thinking of saddling up as if I were going to ride and then walking him away from the barn and the leading him back with someone dragging a log behind us (not attached to him in any way) until he gets used to the sound of it. Then I thought I would tie a rope to the horn and attach a small log to the rope get him to pull that up. You think that would work? Or do you think I need some other kind of equipment? Or should I train him in a different way? Or should I not train him to do that at all (it's not a necessity}? I know it's kind of a strange question, but I'm seriously considering it, but I don't want to do anything that will mess up my horse or cause him to get hurt!!!!! That is the most important thing to me!!!
sandy2u1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 12:23 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Grants Pass, Oregon
Posts: 16
• Horses: 0
Don't tie anything to the saddle! If he spooks, you need to be able to drop it. It will be a disaster if it is tied to him and he bolts.

I teach all of our horses to drag. I start with just desensitizing him to the rope. Start on the ground. Toss the rope over his withers, back, rump, and last, legs. Once he is comfortable with the rope touching him all over, then carry the rope and let him get used to it being all over him. Throw it on the ground and drag it back up, walk him around with it dragging on the ground, from both sides. Let it touch his legs and drag underneath him.

If you have an experienced horse that will drag something, ride your horse behind it and let him get used to following it. Then you can ride next to it and let him get used to that - be careful not to let him get tangled in the rope.

When you do start dragging something with him, start with something light. When he's OK with that, then you can add some weight. He needs to get used to the weight gradually.

Another thing that sometimes scares them - after they are used to dragging items forward, is if you back them up with the object being drug. They see it chasing them, and it's a whole new thing to get used to!

Don't take anymore wraps on the horn than you have to to drag the item. In fact, you can just hold the rope at first and drag it with your hand. Then take one wrap. If you need to, take two wraps - never more. Be sure you can get the dallies off quickly if your horse spooks.

Hope this helps!
WesternLifestyle is offline  
post #3 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 12:36 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida, GA line
Posts: 1,249
• Horses: 2
Dragging logs is one of the things I like to teach my horses. Just tie a rope to a small tree and HOLD the rope with your hand and drag it until the horse is okay with it. Then you can wrap the rope around the saddle horse once or twice. Like the above poster said, Never tie anything to your saddle horn. I use my horses to pull my live traps into the woods during the winter months. They make a hell of alot of noise but the horses usually get over the noise of the object fast.

Or you could pull around a tire just to let your horse feel the weight and get used to a rope on their side.

Happy Trails :)
lacyloo is offline  
post #4 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,266
• Horses: 1
Thank you both very much! Now I'm so glad I asked before I tried it. I'm going to start tomorrow with the rope work. I don't have an experienced horse that can drag a log in front of my horse, but I do have an experienced person I'm especially grateful for the no tying things on the saddle horn tip! Although, now that it is pointed out I can see how dangerous it is, while I was coming up with my plan on how to teach my horse I just didn't think of it . I will for sure take your advice and just use one wrap, that way it's just a matter of letting go if Major freaks out or anything. Thanks again!
sandy2u1 is offline  
post #5 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:21 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
I like to start with something kind of heavy. That way if they want to run off a little bit it's more work for them. When your first starting off dragging something let your rope slip a little while the horse is building a little momentum then take another dally. Kind of like how you let out a clutch on a standard transmission. Another thing to remember is if you need to let go of your rope pull straight up and pop the dallies off your horn don't just let go of the rope. This will get you free much quicker and you are less likely to get a finger between the rope and your horn. If you do get a finger caught try to find it before the dogs do and they might sew it back on at the hospital.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #6 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,266
• Horses: 1
Quote:
If you do get a finger caught try to find it before the dogs do and they might sew it back on at the hospital.

I bet ya after reading that I will be very aware of where my fingers are Maybe I should start out with something lighter to make sure I'm popping the dallies off right. This will be my first experience with dragging anything with my horse.
sandy2u1 is offline  
post #7 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:35 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Washington, USA.
Posts: 6,634
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
If you do get a finger caught try to find it before the dogs do and they might sew it back on at the hospital.
Totally unrelated, but I just have to say that I simply LOVE the things this man says sometimes!! Hahahaha!!

"Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds."
riccil0ve is offline  
post #8 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:40 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
Keep your thumb up and dally with your right hand with the rope on the right side of your horse and yo will be fine.


Riccilove- Thanks I aim to entertain!!

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #9 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,266
• Horses: 1
yeah I laughed when I read it! It was funny but I bet there have been many people to really lose a finger trying to learn this. It's definitely something good to point out to beginners such as myself. And if the dog eats my finger, I can't blame kevin
sandy2u1 is offline  
post #10 of 20 Old 01-26-2010, 01:47 AM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,266
• Horses: 1
oh lord, I was thinking rope on left side. With people like me you gotta be specific lol ok....hand right, rope right, thumbs up!
sandy2u1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Putting up a small barn.... suggestions? RubaiyateBandit Barn Maintenance 2 09-01-2009 07:01 AM
Small Barn Plans 7Ponies Barn Maintenance 0 08-26-2009 07:49 PM
Buy a Pony or a small horse? stacieandtheboys Horse Talk 32 01-08-2009 05:30 PM
Horse eating my trees HELP Painteddreamfarm Horse Health 15 12-28-2008 09:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome