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Teaching a horse to walk

This is a discussion on Teaching a horse to walk within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Teaching a horse to walk out
  • Teaching a yearling to walk when beinh rode

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    02-24-2013, 03:27 AM
  #11
Green Broke
The advice was to get proffesional help, with the best will in the world breaking a horse cannot be taught from the internet
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    02-24-2013, 06:20 PM
  #12
Weanling
I would suggest getting someone experienced to help you if this is your first horse. It is very near impossible to break a horse with no experience yourself. Every good trainer I know has mentored under somebody while learning and had help with their first few. I have been involved in breaking quite a few horses and broke a few mostly on my own and I still get help all the time.
The key to good horsemanship and becoming a good trainer is knowing when to ask for help. And good help cannot come from an internet forum. You need eyes on the ground to see what you are doing and make sure your timing is perfect.
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    02-24-2013, 06:23 PM
  #13
Yearling
Have a ground handler. You squeeze and if the horse does not move forward, the ground handler moves the horse forward until the horse connects the squeeze of the leg with "move forward".
     
    02-24-2013, 07:10 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
the advice was to get proffesional help, with the best will in the world breaking a horse cannot be taught from the internet
Posted via Mobile Device
Advice is one thing but when it comes across as snotty it's not taken as advice......I do agree with getting some help......
     
    02-24-2013, 07:14 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
Advice is one thing but when it comes across as snotty it's not taken as advice......I do agree with getting some help......
That's the tricky thing about communicating through text. The writer of the message might be trying to be completely sincere, helpful, and honest. But because you can't put a tone to text, it can come across negatively.
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    02-24-2013, 07:21 PM
  #16
Yearling
In all honesty, yes, she more than likely needs to find a professional but all professionals learned somewhere. Asking for help is a step in the right direction.
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    02-25-2013, 12:37 AM
  #17
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
Down below doesn't seem like it's giving advice but being snitty...



Another snitty one.....I will be snitty too, breaking is spelt this way....



How can a person learn if someone can't ask?
I'm sorry if I was "snitty". The question was kind of dumb, in my opinion (short, terse, and no background information on horse or rider given at all). Obviously she did not think through her training, or choose to research any sort of training prior to getting on the horse - which could of easily bucked her off if it wasn't an amicable animal. As someone who is looking forward to breaking her own horse next year, the answer is both right off the top of my head, and also many hundred pages of groundwork and foundation work.

There's a difference between asking for answers to the test because you didn't do your homework; vs. doing your homework and asking questions because a concept isn't clear to you. There is very little conceptualization in this question, which utterly defeats the amount of finesse and purpose that goes into training a horse to be ridden. I consider myself very "prepared" because I did my homework for my horse, work with trainers, and have the personal experience to work a horse from the ground up. If you have to ask such a question, you are very much not prepared, which is exactly what I pointed out.
     
    02-25-2013, 12:47 AM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
I'm sorry if I was "snitty". The question was kind of dumb, in my opinion (short, terse, and no background information on horse or rider given at all). Obviously she did not think through her training, or choose to research any sort of training prior to getting on the horse - which could of easily bucked her off if it wasn't an amicable animal. As someone who is looking forward to breaking her own horse next year, the answer is both right off the top of my head, and also many hundred pages of groundwork and foundation work.

There's a difference between asking for answers to the test because you didn't do your homework; vs. doing your homework and asking questions because a concept isn't clear to you. There is very little conceptualization in this question, which utterly defeats the amount of finesse and purpose that goes into training a horse to be ridden. I consider myself very "prepared" because I did my homework for my horse, work with trainers, and have the personal experience to work a horse from the ground up. If you have to ask such a question, you are very much not prepared, which is exactly what I pointed out.
Have you ever watched Clinton Anderson? He always says no question is stupid (dumb).....I'm not wanting to argue with people on here, it's just sometimes people are so abrupt with others it does come across as rude.
Like you I did my homework, I've done all the ground work and foundation work on my 4yr. And started him under saddle last fall. Not everyone is as organized or prepared as you or I would be but I wouldn't consider them dumb because of it.......
     
    02-25-2013, 03:27 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
Advice is one thing but when it comes across as snotty it's not taken as advice......I do agree with getting some help......
Thunderspark you are not a moderator so shouldnt be telling other members how they can and cannot post and your posts come accross as snotty and agressive as well.

Getting on a horse squeezing with your leg and praying the horse works out what to do before you smack it one with a stick is not a good way to break a horse. Infact it is a very good way to break a neck when the horse explodes at being smacked. It is also a very good way to confuse a young horse and end up with dangerous behavior undersaddle. I can tell you now that my lad (who i've just broken in) would have litteraly killed you had you done that, you would have been catapulted head first into the ground at speed or into the nearest solid object (he seems to walls)

I will not teach people how to break a horse over the internet as it is a dangerous occupation in the first place and if you add inexperiance with no proper supervision to the mix and you have a recipe for disaster.

The best advice anyone could ever give the OP is to get proffessional help NOW before she gets hurt
     
    02-25-2013, 07:22 AM
  #20
Cat
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
Have you ever watched Clinton Anderson? He always says no question is stupid (dumb).....I'm not wanting to argue with people on here, it's just sometimes people are so abrupt with others it does come across as rude.
Like you I did my homework, I've done all the ground work and foundation work on my 4yr. And started him under saddle last fall. Not everyone is as organized or prepared as you or I would be but I wouldn't consider them dumb because of it.......
Starting out this thread with a little more background info may have been helpful. What has been done with the horse up to this point would give others a starting block as to where to help you from. They would have a better understanding of what knowledge you have and your horse has.

And yes, I've watched Clinton and I think if someone came up to him and asked him that question like you did this forum he would have had quite the snarky reply that would have made everything here seem extremely tame. He doesn't baby horses or people.

And while everyone may not be as organized or prepared as another person - you really need to be to start a horse properly and not ruin them. Like others have said - if you are having difficulty to even get your horse to walk under saddle - get real-life help. A forum can't help much in this situation.
     

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