Teaching my horse to respond better to leg pressure
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Teaching my horse to respond better to leg pressure

This is a discussion on Teaching my horse to respond better to leg pressure within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Leg pressure horse training
  • Horses air supply cut off from hackamore

Like Tree4Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-04-2013, 08:10 PM
  #1
Foal
Post Teaching my horse to respond better to leg pressure

Hey people

So I have a 10 year old Quarter Horse x Standardbred...her name is Jessie. She was professionally trained by VH (Van Hessen I think its spelt) but I want to teach her better leg pressure.... My mom wants me to ride her in a bit (I ride her in a halter) but the only problem is somebody who had her before us was so hard on her mouth she has scars on her left side, and I don't like coming into contact cause she'll throw her head and I'm afraid of hurting her .

Okay so she knows leg pressure a little bit... but only when something is in her way... I ride Western if it makes any difference

For example...I put her in front of the house, so she has no choice to go anywhere but left or right. She knows leg pressure in this situation, like left means go right and right means go left, and I tested this too. I asked her to go left by applying pressure her to right, and she went left. However, afterwards, its like she doesn't know anything (from the leg when it comes to going directions, she knows a small kick/squeeze from both legs = go faster)..

How can I teach her better leg pressure so she'll go in directions by cues from the leg, and not just when I put her in front of the house? When I walk or have her go faster I have to come into contact with her mouth to get her to change directions (I have very soft hands and she has a soft mouth, all I have to do is point the reins in the direction...but I hate using a bit because of her scars in the left side of her mouth)...

Can leg pressure be taught from the ground? I love doing groundwork since I'm not in the mood to ride this month.... Is it possible to use a whip to teach her better? Like say I take the whip, make contact in the area, and have her move away from the pressure.... example I make contact on her left side with the whip and keep applying pressure every 3 seconds until she moves away from the pressure....Hopefully transferring it under saddle....Left side pressure means move away and go to the right...

I'm sorry if this doesn't make any sense but I hope y'all understand what I'm asking

Please help :)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-04-2013, 09:11 PM
  #2
Weanling
You can teach her to move away from pressure on the ground by using your thumb to apply pressure in the approximate area your leg would touch her for the cue. Start with light pressure and increase the pressure until she moves then release the pressure so she knows she did the right thing. Get her to where all you do is barely touch her with your thumb and she moves, it will translate to the saddle. Remember to start lite and increase the pressure until she moves.

You can also use a hackamore if you don't want to use a bit, Little S hackamores are good for bending as well as a Stivers hackamore. Then you don't need to feel bad about touching her mouth.
RedTree likes this.
     
    09-05-2013, 02:21 AM
  #3
Foal
Thanks for your answer! :) Now I feel even beter that I don't even have to use a whip to teach her! :) I'll do what you suggested I have the plan all worked out...And I would ride in a hackamore but my mum won't let me use those either because she doesn't like them...I think its the way they function... They cut off their air supply as far as I know :/
     
    09-05-2013, 06:37 AM
  #4
Weanling
Hackamores do not cut off the air supply any more so then riding with a halter. Hackamores work off of pressure points. Horses have very sensitive nerves all over their face and a properly placed and balanced hackamore is a not going to hurt a horse if used properly. Any bit, hackamore or halter for that matter in the wrong hands will hurt a horse. I do not recommend a mechanical hackamore they are good for stopping not turning. Like I said previously a little s hackamore or stivers hackamore are good choices if you don't want to use a bit. Only riding a horse in a halter is dangerous you have no leverage and no way to stop if your horse bolts. And even the best trained horses will bolt at some point at something. Please educate yourself and learn about bits as well as hackamores, if you need help find a professional in your area to help you. Be safe.
     
    09-05-2013, 07:47 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
Hackamores may cut down air supply if you put them on too low and crank the noseband too tight. The same applies to simple nosebands - they can be put on in a harmful way. However, if properly fitted, a hackamore causes no specific harm, if the rider has light hands, of course.

Compare - a horribly fitted hackamore that is cutting off the air supply of this horse:



And a properly fitted hackamore that is doing no harm to the horse:



An S hackamore works off poll, nose and chin pressure and is considered to be one of the kindest hackamores. I will disagree about needing some leverage for a bolting horse, though - no leverage will stop a proper bolt and, on the other hand, a well educated horse that has been taught to be responsive, will be fully able to stop from the lightest pressure in a simple halter.
     
    09-05-2013, 09:35 PM
  #6
Yearling
You can also make it a game once you work with sensitizing her to your cue from the ground. When you are riding, ask for pivots and forehand turns by using the least amount of pressure from your leg as possible- a very minor vibration, build up until she moves off your leg, then get off her side like a hot potato!

The more you do this she will learn that the tiny leg "vibration" means yield away from pressure. It's fun when you make it a game :) good luck!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    09-05-2013, 11:34 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by gssw5    
Hackamores do not cut off the air supply any more so then riding with a halter. Hackamores work off of pressure points. Horses have very sensitive nerves all over their face and a properly placed and balanced hackamore is a not going to hurt a horse if used properly. Any bit, hackamore or halter for that matter in the wrong hands will hurt a horse. I do not recommend a mechanical hackamore they are good for stopping not turning. Like I said previously a little s hackamore or stivers hackamore are good choices if you don't want to use a bit. Only riding a horse in a halter is dangerous you have no leverage and no way to stop if your horse bolts. And even the best trained horses will bolt at some point at something. Please educate yourself and learn about bits as well as hackamores, if you need help find a professional in your area to help you. Be safe.
I'm only telling you what my mum and other people have told me :) And yes I agree any bit/hackamore/halter is harsh in the wrong hands and I have very soft hands :) My horse has bolted in just a halter and I was able to control her. She stops on a dime, its just the leg pressure I want to improve on, because my mum wants me to ride her in a bit....My mom won't let me use a hackamore
     
    09-05-2013, 11:37 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saranda    
Hackamores may cut down air supply if you put them on too low and crank the noseband too tight. The same applies to simple nosebands - they can be put on in a harmful way. However, if properly fitted, a hackamore causes no specific harm, if the rider has light hands, of course.

Compare - a horribly fitted hackamore that is cutting off the air supply of this horse:



And a properly fitted hackamore that is doing no harm to the horse:



An S hackamore works off poll, nose and chin pressure and is considered to be one of the kindest hackamores. I will disagree about needing some leverage for a bolting horse, though - no leverage will stop a proper bolt and, on the other hand, a well educated horse that has been taught to be responsive, will be fully able to stop from the lightest pressure in a simple halter.
I definitely see the difference. I would LOVE to use a hackamore but my mum says they cut off their air supply even if its properly fitted. She doesnt like hackamores therefore doesn't let me use them.
     
    09-05-2013, 11:39 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninamebo    
You can also make it a game once you work with sensitizing her to your cue from the ground. When you are riding, ask for pivots and forehand turns by using the least amount of pressure from your leg as possible- a very minor vibration, build up until she moves off your leg, then get off her side like a hot potato!

The more you do this she will learn that the tiny leg "vibration" means yield away from pressure. It's fun when you make it a game :) good luck!
Posted via Mobile Device
Cool! I will try that. Thanks for the suggestions :)
Beling likes this.
     
    09-06-2013, 02:43 AM
  #10
Foal
What I did with my 8 year old OTTB, was just work and work and work on leg yeilds and turning on the haunches/forehand. He still doesnt like the turns, but I can make him bend or turn just with my legs now. All I would do was spend an hour a day just working on the yields and showing him that once he got what I wanted I would stop the pressure. I would end once he figured out that bending was all I wanted and would do it the instant I put on a bit of pressure. It works for me, hopefully it will help!
     

Tags
horse training

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Training a horse to neck rein when he doesn't even move off leg pressure? Blondehorselover Horse Training 7 08-01-2012 12:39 AM
Horse going backwards with leg pressure stephk Western Riding 18 02-04-2012 03:46 PM
Wanted: Tips on teaching a horse to move away from pressure tank Horse Training 1 10-09-2011 09:57 PM
horse will not respond to pressure horseshoes Horse Training 11 08-17-2010 09:29 AM
How do I get my horse to respond to my leg? xilikeggs0 Horse Training 8 01-30-2009 07:03 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0