Three Problems
   

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Three Problems

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  • My horse keeps jerking my reins out of my hands
  • Horse lowering head and pulling on the reins. What to do?

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    08-28-2011, 01:01 AM
  #1
Yearling
Three Problems

My horse has three main problems.

1. He wants to pull the reins out of my hands. Just imagine a horse lowering its head to graze but with force against the bit. I don't pull back or jerk, I just keep my hand even with my horn and let him hit the bit and figure out that he's not pulling the reins out of my hand. What should I do?

2. When riding I can't seem to get him to stay in a straight line. He is difficult to keep straight or turn. He likes to drift from side to side. I put him back where I want him to be and he moves off again. While doing this, he isnt giving into the pressure. He takes his face to the opposite direction. I want him to give in and let me have his face.

3. I have a difficult time stopping. I have him in a loose ring snaffle and it takes some pulling to make him stop. I do sit back in my saddle and lean my legs forward when stopping. He ignores me. I want to be able to tell him to stop and that's what I mean, STOP! Don't move forward two steps, don't keeping going. I'm going to start competing in high speed events and a good stop is a must for both his safety and mine.


All in all, I want to be able to fix these problems and keep him soft, soft, soft at the same time. I'm not looking to create a hard mouthed horse. I want to make his riding experience more pleasent rather than yanking and twisting and turning every minute. I want to have fun and I'm sure he wants to have fun too!
     
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    08-28-2011, 11:31 AM
  #2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelWannabe    
My horse has three main problems.

1. He wants to pull the reins out of my hands. Just imagine a horse lowering its head to graze but with force against the bit. I don't pull back or jerk, I just keep my hand even with my horn and let him hit the bit and figure out that he's not pulling the reins out of my hand. What should I do?

2. When riding I can't seem to get him to stay in a straight line. He is difficult to keep straight or turn. He likes to drift from side to side. I put him back where I want him to be and he moves off again. While doing this, he isnt giving into the pressure. He takes his face to the opposite direction. I want him to give in and let me have his face.

3. I have a difficult time stopping. I have him in a loose ring snaffle and it takes some pulling to make him stop. I do sit back in my saddle and lean my legs forward when stopping. He ignores me. I want to be able to tell him to stop and that's what I mean, STOP! Don't move forward two steps, don't keeping going. I'm going to start competing in high speed events and a good stop is a must for both his safety and mine.


All in all, I want to be able to fix these problems and keep him soft, soft, soft at the same time. I'm not looking to create a hard mouthed horse. I want to make his riding experience more pleasent rather than yanking and twisting and turning every minute. I want to have fun and I'm sure he wants to have fun too!

Aaahhh!


This is a normal thing, it happens. You should make him trust you, he is just quite afraid of things around.

Make him feel friendly, spend lot of time with him and it's going to be fine rider!

     
    08-28-2011, 11:42 AM
  #3
Showing
Barrel, how much training do you and your horse have?

Sounds as if he either wasn't trained completely, or he knows you're a newbie and is taking advantage. Horses can get sloppy and lazy too, especially if they know their riders are unable to control them properly.

Regardless of what the first poster told you, your horse is NOT afraid, he's testing his boundaries with you.

It's not 'normal', nor is it going to get better unless you address the issues. Spending time with him is completely useless unless you're working toward fixing the problems.

Some people think being BFFs with their horses means the animal knows not to be 'bad' or 'mean'. Unfortunately for them, horses are not people and don't think like we do.

Please don't listen to less than helpful 'advice'. It won't do anything except possibly get you hurt.
     
    08-28-2011, 11:52 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Barrel, how much training do you and your horse have?

Sounds as if he either wasn't trained completely, or he knows you're a newbie and is taking advantage. Horses can get sloppy and lazy too, especially if they know their riders are unable to control them properly.

Regardless of what the first poster told you, your horse is NOT afraid, he's testing his boundaries with you.

It's not 'normal', nor is it going to get better unless you address the issues. Spending time with him is completely useless unless you're working toward fixing the problems.

Some people think being BFFs with their horses means the animal knows not to be 'bad' or 'mean'. Unfortunately for them, horses are not people and don't think like we do.

Please don't listen to less than helpful 'advice'. It won't do anything except possibly get you hurt.
^^This.
I have no idea what the other post is about but him not stopping & swerving isn't fear at all- it's him doing what he wants. Making friends is NOT what te horse needs right now. At all. He needs a leader.
I would start at step one & get him giving to the bit from the ground. He just doesn't wanna listen to you at all.

Do you have a trainer?
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    08-28-2011, 02:42 PM
  #5
Yearling
Speed: I am a newbie, but I try to not let that hinder me.
He is still trying to test me but I do my best to set him back. I don't pull and jerk at him, I just remind myself to be patient. I know enough about riding to know what he's doing wrong with the problems I've told you about, I just don't know how to fix it.
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    08-28-2011, 02:44 PM
  #6
Yearling
QH Gunner: I don't have a trainer. I am looking into sending him to one for a month or so for a refresher course. My gelding hadn't been ridden in a while before me getting him. How you I work him to give to the bit on the ground? Lunging?
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    08-28-2011, 02:48 PM
  #7
Showing
So he's already trained, then? I thought as much. He knows you're not sure of what you're doing, so he's taking advantage.

Sending him to a trainer for a refresher is a good idea, but until you get more experience in how to correct his problems, that time away will be useless unless you're training right alongside him. Horse and rider need to be trained together, otherwise you're still going to have the same issues with him once he comes back home.
     
    08-28-2011, 02:59 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
So he's already trained, then? I thought as much. He knows you're not sure of what you're doing, so he's taking advantage.

Sending him to a trainer for a refresher is a good idea, but until you get more experience in how to correct his problems, that time away will be useless unless you're training right alongside him. Horse and rider need to be trained together, otherwise you're still going to have the same issues with him once he comes back home.

Alright. My main problem, the others I can work with in time, is the stop. That's the main thing I want him to do. I stop him from my seat, vocally, and with my hands. What's the best way to fix this? Is there a good bit, or just put more force and meaning in my stop? I don't want him to learn to push through the bit when I tell him to stop.
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    08-28-2011, 03:05 PM
  #9
Showing
Do you know who owned this horse prior to you? He may already be hard mouthed, and a loose ring snaffle just isn't going to cut it.

I believe in the least harsh bit that gets the job done, but in trying to be kind, you may have gone too light with him.

My TB bulls through a regular loose ring snaffle, hated the D-ring French link I tried as well as the rubber covered eggbutt, and finally decided he liked the jointed D-ring with a low port. He goes very happily in that bit.

I'm not saying to go to a double twisted wire long shanked bit, but you might try different ones on him to see how he goes in them. Sometimes something as simple as another bit may make all the difference.
     
    08-28-2011, 03:07 PM
  #10
Trained
Don't worry about creating a hard-mouthed horse because you already have one. YOU should go to a trainer. The horse is either uneducated or spoiled but if you don't respond in the correct manner it will only get worse.
     

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