three year old paint always hyper? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 09:59 PM
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Perhaps you can take out the oats and give him safechoice or senior feed, if he really needs grain. If he doesn't need grain, cut it out completely. What kind of hay does he get? Alfalfa can attribute to hyper behavior in some horses. Overall, I think he's just a three year old and they will generally have spunk, as you probably know.

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post #12 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:22 PM
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If you are so convinced that you are some superb trainer that doesn't need help from anyone, when why are you asking questions about things that I would consider very basic knowledge that comes first when learning how to train a horse?

However, I am confused. You absolutely refuse to send this horse to a trainer, even though he's proven he's willing to buck and you seem to be unable to get him to do something that's relatively simple (crossing water), yet you plan to send your older horse to a trainer because he laid down with you, rolled, and then refused to move on a recent trail ride (which, by the way, is a training problem that even young trainers know how to handle)? Also, I thought this 3 year old was the one that was Amish trained and very well behaved both on the ground and in the saddle?

I suggest you take a closer look at your training abilities. Your 4 year old paint that you called "almost finished" owned you on a trail ride by laying down to roll and then refusing to move under saddle, so you just gave up and walked all the way back to the trailer. This is also the same horse that had the head bobbing problem that you couldn't figure out, but he's also hot/hyper, buddy sour, and travels like a giraffe.

My dear, I think you don't know nearly as much about horses as you think you do, especially when it comes to training one. You are in way over your head and you are too arrogant and naive to see that. I suggest you find a trainer to try to fix your horses and then take some lessons yourself to learn how to be a better rider so you don't undo all the progress the trainer is able to make.

Until then, I will send up a prayer for your horses, they are probably going to need it.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #13 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
If you are so convinced that you are some superb trainer that doesn't need help from anyone, when why are you asking questions about things that I would consider very basic knowledge that comes first when learning how to train a horse?

However, I am confused. You absolutely refuse to send this horse to a trainer, even though he's proven he's willing to buck and you seem to be unable to get him to do something that's relatively simple (crossing water), yet you plan to send your older horse to a trainer because he laid down with you, rolled, and then refused to move on a recent trail ride (which, by the way, is a training problem that even young trainers know how to handle)?

I suggest you take a closer look at your training abilities. Your 4 year old paint that you called "almost finished" owned you on a trail ride by laying down to roll and then refusing to move under saddle, so you just gave up and walked all the way back to the trailer. This is also the same horse that had the head bobbing problem that you couldn't figure out, but he's also hot/hyper, buddy sour, and travels like a giraffe.

My dear, I think you don't know nearly as much about horses as you think you do, especially when it comes to training one. You are in way over your head and you are too arrogant and naive to see that. I suggest you find a trainer to try to fix your horses and then take some lessons yourself to learn how to be a better rider so you don't undo all the progress the trainer is able to make.

Until then, I will send up a prayer for your horses, they are probably going to need it.
Somebody did their research, wow!

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post #14 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
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He does have great ground mannors and saddle mannor yes he did buck I stayed on and corrected him. He's amish broke but they werent nice about it. Yes I am sending my 4 year old he's almost broke but I want him to be the best he can be he's 16.2 hh And still growing he gets tantrums that can get dangeruse.And I think it would be best to get him trained. Im hoping to show him next year and need him to listenreally really well and the trainer he will be going to is one of the best. And the other horse is small enough so me and my mom can work with him.
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post #15 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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By the way I didnt walk him back I rode him. Yes he layed down that's because he's lazy and doesnt like to do much woek in the saddle but rides great bareback.
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post #16 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:48 PM
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I don't understand the point of this thread.
Sorry.
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post #17 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:51 PM
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HarleyWood, how old are you? Just a simple, not threatening question. I'm curious.
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post #18 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by HarleyWood View Post
By the way I didnt walk him back I rode him. Yes he layed down that's because he's lazy and doesnt like to do much woek in the saddle but rides great bareback.
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Horses don't lie down under saddle because they're "lazy." They do it because they have the rider's number and know who's really in control. A good rider will see the signs of a horse going down long before he makes the initial movements and will be able to circumvent his descent.
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post #19 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:54 PM
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...But I thought your 4 year old was "almost finished"? Now he throws tantrums and is dangerous? What a turnaround!!

Also, I hate to be the one to break it to you, but 14.2 or 16.2, you cannot overpower a horse and if you think that just because he's smaller that you can handle him, you are seriously mistaken. None of the training issues you have discussed in any of your threads has anything to do with size. They are training problems because you don't know how to handle them because you don't know how to properly train a horse.

Perfect example is your 4 year old. In one thread you call him almost finished, in here you call him almost broke, but in the next breath you are saying he throws tantrums and is dangerous...those things aren't even in the same universe, let alone in the same ballpark. It scares me to consider what you would call a finished horse...one that maybe won't buck you off, or roll on top of you? Don't mind the fact that he's hot and spooky, he's "finished"? :roll:

All I can hear is you saying "the horse this, the horse that" and a bunch of excuses about what the horse's problem is. If you knew the first thing about training, you would realize that the horse's problem is you. You have no clue what you are doing but are absolutely convinced that you do and the horses are paying the price.


Wait. I'm re-reading some stuff and coming across some more inconsistencies. Did you train this 3 year old or this the Amish?

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #20 of 43 Old 11-07-2011, 10:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
Horses don't lie down under saddle because they're "lazy." They do it because they have the rider's number and know who's really in control. A good rider will see the signs of a horse going down long before he makes the initial movements and will be able to circumvent his descent.
Help me with this, so I can be sure I have it right- I'm assuming its when their head gets very low, steps a little slower and a little more considering, so to speak? Don't their shoulders start to 'loosen up' a little, too? I'm still quite a novice rider but I don't want to be caught completely unknowing someday.

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