three year old paint always hyper? - Page 3
 
 

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three year old paint always hyper?

This is a discussion on three year old paint always hyper? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        11-08-2011, 12:03 AM
      #21
    Showing
    Shina, slowing down, sniffing the ground, sometimes they will paw a few times. There are some horses, though, that can be down before you even realize they are thinking about it LOL. The important thing is that you react quickly the instant you realize what's going on and get the horse either back on their feet or moving. Where people run into trouble is when they allow the horse to finish rolling and then give them time to decide when they want to get back up. You have to do whatever necessary to get the horse back up if he does manage to get down with you.
    ShinaKonga likes this.
         
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        11-08-2011, 01:23 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    My gelding just layed down he had a bad day and he didnt feel like going for a ride the person only rode indoors or in a pen. So he needs work outsde of that. I don't think im a suberb trainer and im 17. This thread was to know how to get him to calm down and just relax around stuff. Not to pick apart. Me an my horses. I got my 4 year old because my qhs pasture mate coliced and we did everything but in the end we had to watch him die. And my horse was without a herd mate, we had my wolf hybreed but he had to be put down because of lymes and an auto immune disorder. So I found him and rode he did well so we got him. And me and my friend got the other as a surprise for my mom :) after her horse coliced
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        11-08-2011, 01:27 AM
      #23
    Banned
    So your wolf hybreed was your horse's former pasture mate?
         
        11-08-2011, 01:31 AM
      #24
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HarleyWood    
    My gelding just layed down he had a bad day and he didnt feel like going for a ride the person only rode indoors or in a pen. So he needs work outsde of that. I don't think im a suberb trainer and im 17. This thread was to know how to get him to calm down and just relax around stuff. Not to pick apart. Me an my horses. I got my 4 year old because my qhs pasture mate coliced and we did everything but in the end we had to watch him die. And my horse was without a herd mate, we had my wolf hybreed but he had to be put down because of lymes and an auto immune disorder. So I found him and rode he did well so we got him. And me and my friend got the other as a surprise for my mom :) after her horse coliced
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I don't quite understand why you're bringing up having to put down animals... But okay.
    As for him 'having a bad day', put it to this aspect- I might have a bad day, but I still show up at work, because its my job. Because my boss told me to go to work. You need to be this horse's boss, and you need to make him go to work and do HIS job. From what I've read, it seems that you need to work on some leadership training with these horses, because they have your number pegged on basic issues. I have my first horse and I'm a novice, but I still make sure he doesn't dare even think of doing a lot of the issues you've brought up. That doesn't make me superior, but it does show what you have to work on. As for the hyperactivity, you've been given plenty of suggestions. If you want him to relax, be a better leader- if the leader doesn't see something as a problem, there will be less of a chance he'll freak out over it.
    Tianimalz likes this.
         
        11-08-2011, 10:38 AM
      #25
    Showing
    The first few times a youngster goes on trail rides is he's seeing everything for the first time and acting in a manner to preserve himself. His reaction to having his rump touched is not indicative of abuse but attack by a predator. A horse sees down each side and each eye is telling his brain mixed messages, therefore he reacts. He wasn't taking a chance on being someone's dinner. And there's a big blind spot back there. Same under his jaw, his throat could be attacked. He won't cross water or enter puddles because he can't see the bottom and to him it could be a great abyss. As he builds trust in you he will begin to enter puddles and cross streams. His vision of anything more than several feet away is like a camera out of focus, the post could be seen as a huge snake (danger) a bush as a large predator. With this type of eyesight horses have to rely heavily on their other senses, especialy flight to remain alive, and in time, their rider.
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        11-08-2011, 11:00 AM
      #26
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    As he builds trust in you he will begin to enter puddles and cross streams.
    In my experience, it happens the other way around. As I get the horse to enter puddles and cross streams without anything bad happening the horse begins to build trust. If you allow the horse to make the decisions and decide to cross water or not then you will never get the horse to trust you because in the horses mind he is the one keeping the both of you out of trouble.
    Wallaby, smrobs, Tianimalz and 2 others like this.
         
        11-08-2011, 11:10 AM
      #27
    Showing
    If you won't get training help to help yourself, do it to help your horse. Do you really want another horse that acts like your 4 year old?

    And I'm sure the people training him before had their ways of doing things, but doesn't mean they were being rough on him. Have you SEEN how foals react to their feet being lifted for the first time? You have to be careful not to lose all of your teeth :P And those are little horses.. you're dealing with a 3 year old who weighs a LOT more and can react a LOT faster.
         
        11-08-2011, 11:55 AM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Okay I'm not getting in to this debate o.o

    All I would say is re think his food, and how much he's getting. As a 3yo, he's bound to have energy, and maybe get a bit on the excited side. Try and keep his mind occupied as much as possible.

    I've been riding 7 years-ish, I'm now 20years old and just bought my first 'project'.. an unfinished, skinny, monster sized WB.

    Do you have someone in the area that can give you lessons? I've found that eyes on the ground is really helpful! I have two lessons a week, with my old school master it was once in a blue moon, but you have to remember this is the education you're giving the horse for life.

    Lessons, even once every couple of weeks will help because a trainer/teacher can tell you if you're progressing, any bad habits you've picked up, which we all do :) and help correct them.

    I don't know much about working 3yo's, just make sure you don't over work in your excitement to achieve things and turn him sour. If you've done so well with him, carry on with a lot of groundwork, introduce other people to touch him, make sure they're wearing hard hats, and then he can get used to others as well.
         
        11-08-2011, 05:07 PM
      #29
    Foal
    I'm getting into this a bit late, but here goes.

    Honey, I've been doing the horse thing for almost 20 years now - if there's anything I've learned, it's that the amount of time involved with horses reflects very little on your own abilities. I know people who have had horses for 40 years or more who still barely know which end the poop comes out.

    You need help. I know you don't want to hear it, I know you're very confident, but you are coming on here seeking help and the issues you are describing are simply not things that we can help you with over the internet. It's upsetting to be told you don't know as much as you think you do, sure, but the results are speaking for themselves here. Accept it and move on, you can take the advice given here and work with a capable trainer to gain the experience you need, or don't take it - but don't complain to us if it doesn't work out for you.

    The behaviours you describe in this 3 year old (and the 4 year old) are unacceptable. The 3 year old is not good on the ground if you can't handle the hind legs (and I don't mean being able to touch them before he jerks it away, you should be able to pick up the hind foot, do with it whatever you please, and put it down when *you* decide to put it down.). If he's bucking, then he is not respectful under saddle. If your 4 year old is having tantrums then the lack of respect is the issue, not his size. My fear is that your 3 year old is going to go in the same direction, as you appear to be missing the initial signs of disrespect and don't do anything until the situation is severe (ie tantrums, lying down on the trail, bucking, these things don't come out of the blue). You can't learn how to see these things on the internet.

    You seem to be very focused on the 3 year old's past. Let it go. If you work with this horse focused on how the amish were 'mean' to him (and were they really? Did you see them work with him? Or is this the excuse you've made for the behaviour?) you are going to hinder the progress he makes, if he makes any at all - the point of desensitizing is for him to not see these things as a big deal, and that will not happen if you give him excuses for being afraid. While knowing the possible traumas in a horse's background is useful in deciding how to train, fixating on the past and making excuses for negative behaviour based on what may have occurred isn't going to get you anywhere.

    As for feed, it's hard to say without being there - another reason to get a trainer! I don't like oats and other grains, and if it were me I would remove them from his diet. Alfalfa may also be making him energetic, most horses are fine with it but some get wired, but since he is growing he needs the extra nutrition, and since he's young and green the energy is simply part of the territory. Free choice grass hay supplemented with alfalfa if need be, and/or a feed designed for growing horses that is not high in NSC may benefit this horse. I am not recommending this, as I have not seen the horse personally. Get someone who knows what they're doing to assist you, and do your own research on top of that - OUTSIDE of the forums - we're talking books and scientific articles.

    Best of luck and I really hope you find professional help. You may balk now but it can only help you in the long run.
         
        11-08-2011, 05:59 PM
      #30
    Banned
    If harleywood is anything like any other 17 year old I have ever known (I am the oldest of 10 kids... So count my siblings and all their friends...) Harley isn't the one that's in charge of these horses, harley's parent or parents are. Harley's taking credit for being the brains of the operation because harley is 17. 17 year olds know everything and are always right. I know I was a genius when I was 17. So anything anyone is saying is going in one ear and out the other, because harley already knows the answer... And anyone who doesn't agree with harley is just plain wrong.
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