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Time to Move on???

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        06-27-2012, 04:18 AM
      #11
    Started
    OK, firstly, that's scary about the feet - actually the owners sound really awful, so good on you for taking this poor girl on (and paying to)! My farrier went mad on me for leaving Brock's a week longer (i.e. 7 weeks, but his do grow quickly) because I got my dates mixed up. 3 months is crazy. I'd find a way of sorting that first, even just as a one off to see if it makes a difference to the bucking.

    Regarding the bucking, when does she do it? Is it in reaction to an aid? Is it when she's doing something in particular? If it's after she's been ridden for a little while, it may be her way of communicating "OK, I want to finish now". Or it could be pain. Does she react when being saddled as well? Does she have any rubs, lumps or sores around the saddle area? Actually, you mentioned her saddle was too narrow - is she still in this one, or in another? Sorry for the thousand questions :)

    My horse bucks when he doesn't want to do something, usually either because I've asked something that he doesn't understand (as in, when I stumble across one of his training holes) or when he has a bad memory of a spot and doesn't want to be there. Trick is to get them going forward-forward-forward. If a buck is imminent and forward isn't an option, or he starts backing up, then I turn him in tight circles. After a few of these, I 'open the front door' and he is happy to go forward. But obviously this only really works if the problem's mental and not physical.
         
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        06-27-2012, 10:43 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    

    Regarding the bucking, when does she do it? Is it in reaction to an aid? Is it when she's doing something in particular? If it's after she's been ridden for a little while, it may be her way of communicating "OK, I want to finish now". Or it could be pain. Does she react when being saddled as well? Does she have any rubs, lumps or sores around the saddle area? Actually, you mentioned her saddle was too narrow - is she still in this one, or in another? Sorry for the thousand questions :)

    My horse bucks when he doesn't want to do something, usually either because I've asked something that he doesn't understand (as in, when I stumble across one of his training holes) or when he has a bad memory of a spot and doesn't want to be there. Trick is to get them going forward-forward-forward. If a buck is imminent and forward isn't an option, or he starts backing up, then I turn him in tight circles. After a few of these, I 'open the front door' and he is happy to go forward. But obviously this only really works if the problem's mental and not physical.
    She bucks during the ride...or rather....let me clarify....she attempts to buck during every ride. First ride - she started pinning her ears and hunching her back right away... Second ride - it was a little bit after starting out. Third ride - she went a bit longer...

    So far - I have been able to redirect her at the first hint a buck was coming...

    Until this last ride.

    Everything had been going very smoothly - and I figured I must have finally sorted out all the bit / saddle issues. And then she started acting up. I circled...I did a stop/go exercise...and that seemed to help...

    And then, for whatever reason - she decided that was IT. She started bucking. I managed to stay on through the bucks (thankfully she didn't go all-out bronco on me) but when she stopped, I got off.

    I feel as if getting off after the bucking was the wrong thing - but truthfully, I don't know what would have been the "right thing" at that point, because I haven't been able to figure out the problem.

    If it's just her being stubborn - I'm sure I just made it worse by re-inforcing the idea that bad behavior means the ride stops.
         
        06-27-2012, 12:26 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Personally if it was a horse that I am leasing and basically having to retrain, and is potentially dangerous then it makes me wonder why bother with her? There are tons of good horse out there that your not going to get bucked off of and potentially hurt. Also from the sounds of things it doesn't sound like your getting much support from the actual owners so once again I think you would be better just to wipe your hands of the situation go out and either lease a different horse or go out and buy one that is more enjoyable to ride.

    Just my opinion though. Good luck.
         
        06-27-2012, 01:00 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HanginH    
    Personally if it was a horse that I am leasing and basically having to retrain, and is potentially dangerous then it makes me wonder why bother with her?

    I think you would be better just to wipe your hands of the situation go out and either lease a different horse or go out and buy one that is more enjoyable to ride.

    Just my opinion though. Good luck.
    Yes - my mind keeps going back and forth with this. Honestly, if I was in a better position financially...I would just buy a good horse.

    Instead...I'm stuck leasing. And it seems like a lot of the lease horses that are available right now all seem to have "issues" of one kind of another.

    I'm trying to figure out whether this situation is fixable. If it is a simple enough fix - I'd prefer to stick with it.

    But if there's nothing I can do - I'd rather walk away before I get hurt.
         
        06-27-2012, 01:01 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    I'm meeting with the owners today - so hopefully, I'll have an update on the situation...
         
        06-27-2012, 06:28 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Good luck talking with the owners hope it goes well. From the sounds of things it might not be a very easy fix especially if its not pai related. I am willing to bet that the majority of her problem is that she was spoiled and under used before and has developed a habit of bucking when she is put to work. You might have a few wild rides before your get her broke from it and I noticed in one of your previous post that you weren't much of a bronc rider (don't worry neither am I). I rode a mare for a guy and when you put her to work she would just buck you off. Got thrown off 5 times in a half hour but I was younger and dumber back in the day. Now I just don't bother because I have to go to work the next day and can't afford to get hurt. Also riding is supposed to be relaxing and fun for me so I much prefer riding my nice safe horse compared to one that has a bunch of issues.

    If it doesn't work out get looking for a new horse while your working with this one and I am sure you will find something.

    Have fun.
         
        06-28-2012, 06:03 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    UPDATE:

    Both the owners (husband and wife) came out to the barn to meet with me in regards to this situation. They initially responded to my complaint about the horse being overdue for the farrier with disbelief - in a kind of 'didn't we just get that done? - kind of way. Looking at her feet, though, it was obvious she was overdue.

    So the good news is that the owners are having the farrier out ASAP.
    Also good - the owners are very appreciative of all the work I've been doing.

    The bad news? I watched the wife give the horse kissee-kissees...and coo all over her...and then it took the two of them to get the horse to pick up its feet...(and even then the horse was not standing nicely) and then the wife scolded the husband when he smacked the horse for pulling its foot away...

    Honestly - it's easy to see where the bad behavior is coming from.

    I think HanginH hit the nail on the head - she's been spoiled and under-used.

    Probably time to walk away....
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        06-28-2012, 06:40 PM
      #18
    Started
    Perhaps you could explain to them that horses appreciate firmness and leadership (and scent care!), much more than cuddles, and educate them? But they should definitely pay you for something like that... tough situation, and there are so many good horses out there that you could be riding.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-28-2012, 06:51 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
    Perhaps you could explain to them that horses appreciate firmness and leadership (and scent care!), much more than cuddles, and educate them? But they should definitely pay you for something like that... tough situation, and there are so many good horses out there that you could be riding.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I frickin' love your username.
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        06-28-2012, 07:32 PM
      #20
    Showing
    She is bucking because she has gotten away with it likely before you came along. Let's deal with that planted hoof issue first. Use your lunge line and have the whip handy. If she won't pick the hoof up, chase her out to lunge and look like you plan on killing her. You are asserting your dominance and telling her what to do. Lunge her no more than three circles then ask again for her hoof. She likely won't have made the connection so be prepared to chase her out again. Horses aren't real fond of work and would rather have an easy out so she should make the connection for sure after the 3rd time but it may take a fourth. When you lead her always turn her away from you so that again you dominate her. To turn towards you (to the left) means she's dominating you. When you do groundwork and always do it before you ride. Make her back, turn away, back some more, come forward, etc, keep her feet moving in different directions. When she is pretty good with this and it might take a few days, do the same in the saddle. Bend her head toward your knee on each side. Don't force her but do it so she will soften and relax. Then tip her nose until you can see her eye and push her butt over with leg. She will want to walk forward a bit and that's ok as it helps her step under. Think table with one leg missing. This disengages her hindquarters and it's difficult for a horse to buck if you keep it bent. Rather than ride a straight line, weave back and forth, moving the hindquarters first one way then the other.
         

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