Tips for a bad boy!!
   

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Tips for a bad boy!!

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  • How to be a badboy
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    12-24-2011, 03:14 AM
  #1
Foal
Tips for a bad boy!!

Okay. So I have a 17.3h percheron mix he is just about 6 years old now!. He is a lover boy! We rescued him at 4 months old from the kill pen. He was my first horse and probly not the best choice for people who knew NOTHING about horses, and I was only 11.He is halter broke OK with his feet and that's about it. He was at a trainer for about 6 weeks. He was ridden a few times and was hooked too a sleigh and pulled us around. He bucked once and threw the guy off but was good for me,my mom and my sister. Their is a few choosen people he dislikes. But loves most people! He scares most people because he is so big and is pushy! He has never tried too kick,bite or chase me.

I have him borderd at a friends house as we don't have room for a big boy like him. We are trying too buy the 4.5 acers behind us. So if that happens he will be coming home!
So..... 1. He is a Spooky boy, I bet his own shadow would make him jump! What can I do too help him with that?

2. He HAS too be with another horse. They tried too stall him, but within 15 seconds he had the stall door ripped off and was back with the other horse! How do we help him with his fear of being alone? I can't even take him out of the fence and he goes nuts trying too get back with her.

I would love for him too be a trail horse someday.

He really is a sweet boy and I love him very much. I have been told by everyone so far I need too sell him. I wont give up on him tho! I am hoping too have close too 1,000 to send him too a trainer for 2 months ,by mid-summer.

He really is my lover boy!!
Here is a video of him. He was around 16.3h in the video. This was sept.2010

     
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    12-24-2011, 03:24 AM
  #2
Foal
Oh and yes I know his feet are REALLY bad in the video. We had a hard time finding a farrier around here who will even touch a draft. But we found one :)
     
    12-24-2011, 06:39 AM
  #3
Trained
Rachel-he is much too big to be allowed to know it. You need to forget about riding him until you spend some time doing ground work so that he is NOT so pushy (with you or anyone else), and desensitize him a bit. Not sure where you are in Ohio, but perhaps contact Lisa at Frog Pond Draft Rescue. She may be able to send you to someone who can better help you with your draft. That is what she does.

Good luck.
     
    12-24-2011, 09:16 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
First of all, he is not a 'bad boy'. He is just being a horse -- an untrained one. He tears out of stalls and fences because he is a herd animal that no one has taught to accept being separated from his herd.

He is just a horse that no one made any effort to teach how to be a horse than can be handled and tolerated. He suffers from the most common type of 'neglect' -- neglecting to teach him anything that would make him be 'wanted' by anyone. For a horse to have value and be 'worth' feeding and caring for, it has to be taught manners and respect for people and property. They are just too big and strong and destructive to just let them exist. Being a draft just makes the problem bigger -- literally. These are just the cold hard facts of horse-keeping.

Obviously, the sensible thing to do at this point would be to sell him and get a useful horse that justifies the feed bill and that will not destroy its home and injure people. The reality is that no one will want a horse of his size and strength that has no training or manners -- other than the slaughter buyers. I am afraid that this is how most of the fat healthy stock gets into that predicament. They are victims of neglect -- neglect to train them.

Your options now? Spend thousands of dollars on training and still not have a very usable horse or sell him and let the chips fall where they may.

He would first need to be tied safely and securely and taught that he can be separated from his herd and it is still OK. He may have to be tied all day long for several days to convince him that it is OK.

Then he would need to be taught ground manners with a comprehensive program like the one Clinton Anderson puts out.

Since he is so big and so un-mannered, it could be less than a safe undertaking and sure won't be easy. It will be difficult, at best, for someone experienced and nearly impossible for someone that has little experience with schooling tough horses and staying safe doing it. Cost wise, it is not worth doing. $1000.00 to a qualified trainer (if you can find one that wants the project) is a drop in the bucket of what it will take to catch up his training with where it should be.

We had some people with a similar horse come by here looking for help. We no longer train and I would not have wasted my time on him if I did. He was a 5 yr old crypt orchid stud on top of that and they did not have the money or knowledge to have anything done with him. They did not want him going to Mexico so I suggested that they take him to the big cat sanctuary near here and at least the meat would not be wasted and it would not cost them anything. That is what they did.
     
    12-24-2011, 09:27 AM
  #5
Showing
You have a good heart for rescuing him but sending him to a trainer when you yourself don't know what you're doing.. isn't going to help :/

Can you find a trainer to work WITH you? Maybe call it "ground work" lessons? I did something similar when I found they had classes offered (though I didn't work with my horse, I worked with others.) But I wouldn't even think about riding until he's perfect on the ground. THEN you can see maybe about sending him to a trainer to learn to be a riding mount. Then you can take lessons while he's in training to learn how to ride properly. Then when he comes back, you can figure out if you want to keep him to ride or sell him as a started/green horse. That would be the most fair thing to him, and to you, I believe.
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    12-24-2011, 10:31 AM
  #6
Foal
You didn’t say if in your post if Riley has been gelded or not. If he hasn’t, gelding is the first thing on the list.

From a logical standpoint, it would be in your best interests to send Riley down the road and put that $1,000 into an old broke horse. It is always cheaper to buy a trained horse than having a horse trained. With the economy being what it is and if your hay prices are anything like they are here in Indiana, a $1,000 could probably get you a decent horse.

That being said, I understand emotional attachments but I don’t think you are going to find any trainers that will get Riley to be a good trail horse for $1,000. For that price you should be able to get back a respectful horse with good ground manners.

When looking for a trainer, make sure they are willing to not only train the horse but also willing to teach you the exercises the horse has been taught. Keep in mind that respect in a horse is not transferable. You will need to let Riley that you are the leader of the heard. It will be your job after he is back from the trainer to let him know what is acceptable. You will need to continue to work with your horse or in a short period of time you will be back to the same place you are now.

Most of the problems you have pointed out shouldn’t be too difficult to work out with some ground work. For example I have three horses that always get turned out in the same order. The last horse to be turned out is a big mare. Over a period of time she got in the habit of protesting being the last turned out by kicking the stall walls. This started off as an isolated kick every once in a while and worked into a regular thing. It took me about a week to fix the problem.

What I did is in the morning I turned out the other two horses. By the time I got to the mare she was kicking the wall. Instead of turning her out I put a halter on her and took her to the round pen for some work. I went through all sorts of ground work exercises and really put a sweat on her. After about 45 minutes I put her back up in her stall to rest and think about things. The first couple days she would kick the walls after the first workout. That was my queue to pull her out and work her some more. After about 4 or 5 days my mare didn’t fuss when I took the other 2 horses out. My guess is she was hoping I wouldn’t notice her in her stall. I kept the morning workout up for then next few days and still occasionally pull her out and take her to the round pen. Now the stall kicking is a thing of the past.

I don’t think your horse is a lost cause. For the money you have available you should at least be able to get a respect full horse if the trainer is will to work with both you and your horse. Once you have a respectful horse it shouldn't be too difficult to find someone to take him and put some miles on him.

Good luck!
     
    12-24-2011, 11:19 AM
  #7
Foal
Hmm what about learning some natural horsemanship together? May help his nerves a bit. He needs to trust you and respect you as a leader... x
     
    12-24-2011, 11:50 AM
  #8
Yearling
He reminds me of Ginger, my Belgian/TB cross mare. Similar kind of expression. He looks comfortable with you.

I wouldn't necessarily recommend this to anyone but you can do it, if you have enough guts and determination. I did it. I learned to ride and train horses on Ginger and we were both green. Bear in mind that it's true what they say though, green on green makes black and blue. It's a risk. I got beat up, thrown off the side, dragged by a stirrup, bucked off, and run off with but I refused to give up and today I've actually learned to be a horse trainer. But I studied, and I mean hard. I still study hard 7 days a week, and then go out and practice what I've studied. If you have it in you, I'm sure you can do it too. It takes a long time though, and this horse is what we call your 'sacrificial lamb'. You're going to make all your rookie mistakes with him and he'll have to bear the burden of your lack of experience. Still, it's better than the kill truck imo.

If I could go back in time and tell myself a few key things they would be these.

1. Having control of the hindquarters will save your life.

2. The best way to get better at riding is to actually ride.

3. The more you learn, the less you know.

4. You're going to screw up, a LOT. Don't worry so much about it. It's all just part of learning. Horsemanship is a journey not a destination, so may as well enjoy it.

Finally, the only way to get good at this stuff is to have a strong desire and determination to come back and try again and again. Trust your instincts though. You don't have to get in over your head and get into situations where you'll get hurt, though it might happen at times. Just do what you're comfortable with doing, and the things you can do will increase over time as you get better and better.
Moearle likes this.
     
    12-24-2011, 11:55 AM
  #9
Foal
I do know a lot more about horses. That was 6 years ago, I know also have a QH. He has been a gelding since he was 18 months old. And he never breaks out of fences. He respects his electric fence. Sorry but I will never sell.
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    12-24-2011, 12:45 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
He reminds me of Ginger, my Belgian/TB cross mare. Similar kind of expression. He looks comfortable with you.

I wouldn't necessarily recommend this to anyone but you can do it, if you have enough guts and determination. I did it. I learned to ride and train horses on Ginger and we were both green. Bear in mind that it's true what they say though, green on green makes black and blue. It's a risk. I got beat up, thrown off the side, dragged by a stirrup, bucked off, and run off with but I refused to give up and today I've actually learned to be a horse trainer. But I studied, and I mean hard. I still study hard 7 days a week, and then go out and practice what I've studied. If you have it in you, I'm sure you can do it too. It takes a long time though, and this horse is what we call your 'sacrificial lamb'. You're going to make all your rookie mistakes with him and he'll have to bear the burden of your lack of experience. Still, it's better than the kill truck imo.

If I could go back in time and tell myself a few key things they would be these.

1. Having control of the hindquarters will save your life.

2. The best way to get better at riding is to actually ride.

3. The more you learn, the less you know.

4. You're going to screw up, a LOT. Don't worry so much about it. It's all just part of learning. Horsemanship is a journey not a destination, so may as well enjoy it.

Finally, the only way to get good at this stuff is to have a strong desire and determination to come back and try again and again. Trust your instincts though. You don't have to get in over your head and get into situations where you'll get hurt, though it might happen at times. Just do what you're comfortable with doing, and the things you can do will increase over time as you get better and better.


I think I may take you up on this advise. Thank you!!
     

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