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Tips to become a trainer

This is a discussion on Tips to become a trainer within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
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    12-01-2010, 02:28 PM
  #11
Weanling
Thank you all for your replies!

While I don't legally own my horse (Creampuff), I am the only one to work extensively with her. Even her legal owner refuses to touch her and will call me from across the paddock to prepare her for a rider, or move her into a pen to get some lunch. In a manner of speaking she is my horse; she responds best to me. While she may rear, spin, and bolt for one person (or just battle them the whole way), she will merely turn and then plant her feet until I ask her to turn around. She's the kind of horse who has no intention of hurting anyone.

As for Kitten and Speed Racer: My issue is the lack of trainers in my area. I know of one rescue nearby my home town (Catlin, IL) that rescues horses but I cannot for the life of me find their number! I've checked phone books, website rescue listings, online phone books: nothing. But people know of this establishment and I've heard numerous good things about it. (Even that they have a ginormous Clydesdale who even my boss, who loves the breed, is terrified of.)

Otherwise there is the ranch I mentioned earlier (if you can call it that). I know they breed; I have seen mares with foals numerous times. However, I don't know if I should just go and knock on their door.

At the stable I work, we have horses who kick, bite, and will even rear if given the chance. The lot of our herd is dead broke (or close to), but others are not. For example, Creampuff has a saddle issue; if someone other than me saddles her they need to distract her (such as crinkling a wrapper). Part of me wonders why I'm the only person out of over 10 workers, even her owners, who have no issues at all with her outside of her occasionally trying to test me.

Because of her and another horse I work with, 20-year-old gelding Ben Red Dee (Ben), I've become passionate about training. After beginner horseman working with Ben for some time he wouldn't let anyone touch his ears for any reason; using pressure and release I've relieved him of that worry with his ears. However I don't want to do a lot of training for these horses (such as teaching them to turn on a dime with leg pressure like a friend's barrel horse will); they are rented out for trails/lessons. Let alone, a beginner rider would be mortified if their horse did something they unknowingly asked for!

The biggest issue around this area is the lack of resources for this profession and a recently totaled family car. I fully expect the bruises and scrapes, even possible broken bones, that come with this profession I'm pursuing. And I'm fully ready to take that one for the sake of these animals.
     
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    12-01-2010, 02:37 PM
  #12
Showing
I'm not sure how old you are, but if you are in "legal" age you can just spend a year as working student outside your area. Like in the barn I used to go the BO had 2-3 students working year around for her. They didn't pay for rent etc. + had a lesson almost every day. In return they should work in barn and deal with horses.
     
    12-01-2010, 02:44 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
I'm not sure how old you are, but if you are in "legal" age you can just spend a year as working student outside your area. Like in the barn I used to go the BO had 2-3 students working year around for her. They didn't pay for rent etc. + had a lesson almost every day. In return they should work in barn and deal with horses.
Legal age indeed; I'll be 19 come mid-December. Lol

But as I said in the previous post, one issue is the fact that my mother-in-law, paired with an elderly negligent couple, totaled the family car (the motor block was totally shifted, and our mechanic said it could be fixed but wouldn't be a safe car to drive). Transport is a large issue; for the barn I work at now my boss happily picks me up (I've put hundreds of faithful hours into her barn and horses in less than 9 months).

While I only just recently began to ride I am confident in my knowledge and what experience I've gained from working with Thunder Wolf. A good friend is going with me to the Veedersburg auction in Indiana soon to help me feel may way around the horse industry (this is where she and her daughter got their first horse). She tells me that their horse, Titan, has taught them much more than Thunder Wolf ever has. And if I've been with Thunder Wolf nearing a year and experienced several normal, and sometimes abnormal, things, what would my own horse have to teach me? I've ridden nearly all of our horses, save for the 2 I was too heavy to ride, 2 green brokes, and 2 yearlings. My boss won't let me ride them.

But how else would I get experience other than putting myself out there? (Shrug) Live and learn.
     
    12-01-2010, 03:14 PM
  #14
Trained
When I asked a well known trainer in my area to give me advice he said "ride a lot of horses and do it when you're young"
     
    12-01-2010, 03:26 PM
  #15
Weanling
Short, sweet, and meaningful. Thank you GypsyGirl! :)
     
    12-01-2010, 04:09 PM
  #16
Showing
Well, if transportation is an issue (and believe me, I know what it means), then just use what you can at the moment (nearest barn). When you'll have a car you can start exploring different alternatives.
     
    12-01-2010, 04:52 PM
  #17
Weanling
I would suggest talking to the people at tack stores, local vets, farriers.
There may be someone who just isn't largely advertised that could take you on as a student.

Something that stuck out at me is you say you have many faithful hours at your barn and you're confident with your knowledge, but your boss wont let you handle certain or ride certain horses. Are you sure you are realistically ready to start training?

I know around here there are lots of "trainers" who just because they can w/t/c and stay on they call themselves trainers. There are fewer yet who are actually able to get a young horse to do everything correctly. And remember, anyone paying for training, like results, and lot's like fast results.

So don't just settle with any ranch owner you can work for. Keep riding where you are and keep looking for a great trainer to apprentice under. And then when you are ready to step out and train under your own name, you'll have a great, respected reference.
It may involve moving, but like kitten_val said, you can go outside your area to work.
There is a reining stable around here that will take students on. They live in the loft and when they are good enough riders will slowly progress onto greener and greener horses so the horse and rider are never compromised or pushed to much. And I'm not even in a big horse area, and I can only imagine some of the possibilities else where.
     
    12-01-2010, 05:16 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselPony    
Something that stuck out at me is you say you have many faithful hours at your barn and you're confident with your knowledge, but your boss wont let you handle certain or ride certain horses. Are you sure you are realistically ready to start training?

I know around here there are lots of "trainers" who just because they can w/t/c and stay on they call themselves trainers. There are fewer yet who are actually able to get a young horse to do everything correctly. And remember, anyone paying for training, like results, and lot's like fast results.

This is the reason I want to follow a trainer for a number of years first. I want to avoid getting my own horse to test the waters when I have, basically, 0 training experience of my own. Even if I just watch, ask questions, and take notes. Perhaps be involved in a sort of "walkthrough" with my "trainer."

As for these horses, my boss is a safety nut (she recently threatened to fire a kid because he was stretching to scratch a tied horse on its poll). My boss also won't let me even attempt to ride these horses (which are no major problem to a rider willing to work with the horse, instead of forcing it to do what they want in a hard-handed manner), even in the round pen. Without the opportunity for advance, I simply won't be able to make any progress.

I'm also free to handle these horses as I wish; it's riding them when my boss begins to get skeptic. She won't let anyone at the barn, excluding herself, ride them. This includes "Chelsey," a lifetime horse-woman and ex-barrel racer who's had more than 8 horses of her own in the past, and only being 19 years of age.
     
    12-01-2010, 05:39 PM
  #19
Weanling
I do respect you for wanting to learn so much before getting a youngster.
I ended up with a weanling when I so wasn't ready for one (don't ask, long story) and even after riding for 13 years, having several of my own for 10 and working for 2 different trainers for the past 5 years I still ended up in over my head just because of my mare's personality.

Be glad she is a safety nut and not the the extreme. 2 other people I worked with ended up in the ER before I quit working for the first trainer. I guess sit her and down and talk to her, maybe she'll try and get you more involved with riding, even if it is just sitting in the arena having her explain why and what she is doing.

And as you said you do have a horse to ride? One of the best things to help you if you want to pursue riding greenies, get the best seat you possibly can. Bareback especially. You don't want anything to upset your balance to hit a greenie in the mouth or sides, it doesn't end well on some horses, trust me.
     
    12-01-2010, 05:50 PM
  #20
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creampuff    
I currently work at a local livery stable (we rent horses for guided trail rides) that has 23 horses and 1 pony. We have done minimal training; I've helped to train our 3 yearlings to pick up their feet (before our two-year-old began to test the entire group in a severely dangerous way; now my boss has restricted anyone else from touching her).

However, this is not the style of "training" I'm interested in (while it is starting somewhere). Given that it's a must for horses. The closest person I know who breaks horses is in Alabama (me being in Illinois).

My issue is approaching local horseman to ask if they need the help, the ones that I don't know personally. As a matter of fact, I don't know if I should approach and say, "Hey, just stopping by to see if you need any extra help so I can learn how to train horses."

What I don't want to do, by any means, is buy an ill-trained horse to "trail and error," risking ruining the horse or scarring it for life because when it comes to 'extreme' horse training, I have no experience.
I would definitely apprentice under a trainer. Although you have read books and watched movies, it seems the application of what you learned never transfers as nicely as you read it, espically with horses.

I'm in the same boat with you when it comes to talking to trainers you don't know. Right now, I am looking to get an internship under one of (if not the) most accompolished trainers in the area. But he is known to be very honest, and isn't shy about saying what he thinks. Also, I don't kow him that well. I am nervous about asking him if he would be willing to take me on as an intern, but you never know what they are going to say until you ask.
When you do go and ask trainers, be honest and polite with them. Tell them why you want to learn how to train, as well as your goals. If the answer is no, politely accept their answer and ask if they could suggest anybody who /could be willing to take on an extra hand.

Hope this helps!
     

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