Too Much Energy? Help! - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
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Too Much Energy? Help!

My horse Sailor is a 5 year old gelding who I bought about a week ago. He has alot of 'Go' and not too much 'Woah'. I do not have a problem with him liking to run and go fast--I'm acually quite grateful he is like that. The thing i'm not liking is his listening skills.

Before riding, I lunge him to get out any bucks and some energy. I then ride him in the lunge ring to warm him up. He is very responsive in there. He will slow down and stop alright(with a little convincing). I constantly must half halt him so he will stay at the gait he is in(if not, Sailor will get faster and faster until he is up the next gait).

The main problem is riding him on the track(or any open space). It is very big and railed in, but he gets pretty excited riding there. Even after I have cantered him to the world's end in the little lung pen, he suddenly regains his energy back once we get to a more open space. I must constantly half halt just so he will stay at a walk. Whe I ask him to trot, Sailor decides to take off. If I pull back, it feels like he just goes faster. I have to turn his head so that he will calm down and eventually stop.

Any advice on how I can work with Sailor so he will respond to my 'slow down' signals? Again, I like that he has fire in him and loves running, but I just want to be able to control him alittle better.

Thanks,
Sara
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post #2 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 07:38 PM Thread Starter
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Anyone? By the way, I use a hackamore with a snaffle. His tack appears to fit well.
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post #3 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 07:56 PM
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Practice, practice, practice. Not being snarky, it's just true. My guy was the same when I got him (though thankfully he was also out of shape so he couldn't keep it up too long, lol).

Take him out, ask him to transition to the next gait, do a couple strides, then downward transition (yes, the 'transition' may well require a one-rein stop, especially to start with). If he breaks gait on his own, shut him down immediately. Do this transitions from walk-trot-walk about a million times until they're good. Then add in canter. Feel like you've gone backwards a million years. Do the transitions a million more times. It'll take a couple of months, but eventually running and the wide open will no longer cause his brain to exit the building. He's only 5, so there's plenty of time.

Remember that one thing lunging does is make him more fit so he can keep running longer- factor that into your plans. ;)
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post #4 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 07:57 PM
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How is he kept (stalled, pasture, etc) and what is he being fed? What was the training he had prior to you coming into possession of him?
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post #5 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:22 PM
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What are you feeding? Is he being stalled? If so for how long? He is young so more energy than usual should be expected. I've had many horses be CRAZY because of the food having high starch. Please let us know what you are feeding. As far as the speeding up in gaits, at first start him at a walk, trot, walk, trot, walk, trot. Once he gets good, start canter, trot,canter, trot, walk,whoa, etc. Lots and lots of transitions. Do not let him speed up, keep him steady by half halting. The speeding up in gaits is really not difficult to fix, as long as you spend lots of time on it. As far as never being able to tire him out and excessive energy - that could be because of his age, breed, but I really think it could be because of the food. It would helps lots if I knew what you were feeding and how long he gets turnout if at all, because then you can have a better idea where the energy is coming from.
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Last edited by justhorsinaround1; 08-26-2012 at 08:25 PM.
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post #6 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, I will work on the transitions daily! Do you think I should work on them in just the round pen? Should I wait to ride him on the racetrack until he's gotten better at responding, or should I work on my transitions there, too?

Feed:
7AM---1 scoop(3lbs) of Patriot pellets and 2 flakes of costal hay
7PM---1 scoop(3lbs) of Patriot pellets and 2 flakes of costal hay

Sailor is stalled but has a run out that he always has axccess to. I also visit him twice a day and let him eat grass on the lead rope.

His previous owner bred, raised, and trained him. I think she started him at age 2. She has trained quite a few horses.

Hopefully this helps...thanks for the replies!
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post #7 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack View Post
How is he kept (stalled, pasture, etc) and what is he being fed? What was the training he had prior to you coming into possession of him?
This. Have you ever thought that he could maybe be too fit?

My trainer gets a lot of problem horses and I always hear him saying how a majority of their main problems is just that the horse is too fit. Think about it, lunging for 10-20 mins, then warming up for another 10-20 mins, then riding for an hour will really give your boy a lot of muscle. Now I'm not saying you do this by any means, but maybe it's something to think about?

Also, what are you feeding him (like others have asked)? What's his schedule? What were they doing him before you bought him? All factors to think about :)

Hope you find out soon and really progress with your new guy! Good luck :)!
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post #8 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:49 PM
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post #9 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:53 PM
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I have to agree with the previous two posters. We really need to know his dietary situation, and if he is stalled or pastured. His excess energy may very well be a result of too much energy intake, and not enough energy being spent.
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post #10 of 15 Old 08-26-2012, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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His previous owner used him for playdays(mainly barrel racing and pole bending because of how sharp he can turn). She said she was selling him because she was training several other horses and didn't have any time for him. I think he was only being ridden like once a month.
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