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Traditional or Parelli Methods?

This is a discussion on Traditional or Parelli Methods? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        01-21-2009, 11:42 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
    I would definitely suggest Parelli. I don't think there is a better foundation to put on a horse personally. But I would caution you if you plan on mixing Parelli and more traditional training...the risk of confusing the horse is high and I personally don't believe in mixing differnt training ideas. But that's just me.
    I think it's absolutely wonderful to mix training methods, learn as many as you can and decide what works best for you and your horse. It's what I've done.. I have spent most of my life learning different training techniques, and employ many different kinds, from classical to modern to "natural horsemanship" - it's all about the journey and finding exactly what works for you.

    It's not about confusing the horse, but rather testing the waters and finding a mixture that works best for you. I prefer to use a variety of methods, and I firmly believe that the more you know, the better prepared you are to tackle different problems that arise during your riding career.
    For example, if your horse has a problem with accepting the bit, perhaps one method won't work, so you try another, then another, and perhaps you need to mix a few methods to get your horse to find its niche.

    Personally, I have to agree with LoveMyFinny... I have met very few "Parelli-trained" horses that have turned out well.
    My biggest problem is that Parelli tries to teach things he knows nothing about... he gets his horse to "piaffe" and it's completely and totally not collection or impulsion-based, but rather just shuffling the feet.
    I have a few issues with Parelli, I don't agree with many ideas of his... haha. Feel free to PM me if you'd like to chat more.
         
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        01-22-2009, 12:33 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    I think it's absolutely wonderful to mix training methods, learn as many as you can and decide what works best for you and your horse. It's what I've done.. I have spent most of my life learning different training techniques, and employ many different kinds, from classical to modern to "natural horsemanship" - it's all about the journey and finding exactly what works for you.

    It's not about confusing the horse, but rather testing the waters and finding a mixture that works best for you. I prefer to use a variety of methods, and I firmly believe that the more you know, the better prepared you are to tackle different problems that arise during your riding career.
    For example, if your horse has a problem with accepting the bit, perhaps one method won't work, so you try another, then another, and perhaps you need to mix a few methods to get your horse to find its niche.

    Personally, I have to agree with LoveMyFinny... I have met very few "Parelli-trained" horses that have turned out well.
    My biggest problem is that Parelli tries to teach things he knows nothing about... he gets his horse to "piaffe" and it's completely and totally not collection or impulsion-based, but rather just shuffling the feet.
    I have a few issues with Parelli, I don't agree with many ideas of his... haha. Feel free to PM me if you'd like to chat more.

    Couldn't have said it better than yourself JDI and LoveMyFinny... I have nothing good to say about Parelli and what it does to some horses these days. And those who say I'm closed minded can keep their parelli enforcing opinions to themselves. I've attempted to understand Parelli by studying their books and methods for close to a year. I choose to use several other methods out there, and use a variety. I take the good I find in situations and store it in my knowledge base... then if a situation occurs I can try several avenues to find a solution to working with my horses better.
         
        01-22-2009, 01:24 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Not every method will work for every person. Please keep that in mind and let's have a friendly conversation that respects everyone's point of view.
         
        01-22-2009, 01:34 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Isn't there a saying something like that?

    What's good for the goose is not always good for the gander????
         
        01-22-2009, 03:00 PM
      #15
    Trained
    I think the saying is what's good for the goose is good for the gander.

    But it works both ways!!

    I think the saying that fits the best here is that if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all.

    It's always completely OK to disagree with a training method but it is not necessary to run it into the ground.
         
        01-22-2009, 05:07 PM
      #16
    Foal
    I say do what works for you and your new horse. I like watching all different training ideas and take pieces here and there. Not all ways work on every single horse. Find what works for you and go from there.
    Good Luck!
         
        01-22-2009, 08:03 PM
      #17
    Showing
    All I'd like to say is that Parelli doesn't work for every horse. No method does, and anyone claiming that should be given a wide berth. Anderson doesn't work for every horse. Some classical methods of dressage don't work for every horse.
         
        01-22-2009, 08:32 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    I say traditional methods. Im not really into the whole Parelli thing.
         
        01-23-2009, 03:12 PM
      #19
    Foal
    [quote=LoveMyFinny;235587]Personally, I have not been impressed with a single parelli trained horse I have seen. All that I have seen are very disrespectful, have no idea about personal space, and just aren't pleasant to be around. Most of the people around here that do parelli are a bit off their rockers as well, quote]

    I couldn't agree more! I would go so far as to tell you avoid just about anybody who has a television program (except for Chris Cox and maybe a couple of the lesser known trainers).

    I won't go into the reasons I don't like the Parelli way cause I think there's a 10,000 word limit on this forum! Lol if you like a traveling circus, go see him, if you want to go see something similar to the 1800's traveling tent revivals, go see the guys that have shows on on RFDTV (again, Chris Cox is very good, not like the rest of the RFDTV bunch) if you want to get serious about learning horses, do some research on REAL trainers and you'll discover practical and effective ways to train and you'll find ways that work best for you and your horse. If you want a "famous" person to start with...google Curt Pate, if you want an unknown, google Kevin Wescott. Both of these men are "cowboys" who do train in the "natural" ways.
         
        01-23-2009, 05:31 PM
      #20
    Started
    wow...
         

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