Trail training
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Trail training

This is a discussion on Trail training within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse trainer trail
  • Training a Trail Horse

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-07-2012, 08:18 PM
  #1
Foal
Trail training

Hey guys,

Today I got new shoes put on my horse and when I got home from work I saddled him up and off we went. I was with my dad, brother, and a woman who boards her horse at our barn. Whenever Zip and I were in the back or the middle of the group he would want to always be up the horses behind that was in front of him, so I would take him in a circle and go to the back of the group, or he would start trotting whenever he had his entire mouth with the loosest reins possible when I would want him to walk. I'm a huge Clinton Anderson fan and saw a video and he said "make your horse want to be in the back because it's easier and hard to be in the front." but for some reason whenever we led he would walk like he didn't know what he was doing. Any advice on what to do whenever he tries getting back with the group if he falls behind?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-08-2012, 08:07 PM
  #2
Yearling
Consistency. The problems you describe are very typical of horses that are green on the trail. These problems vary from sheer panic when being behind others, to just rushing. These horses just need experience to realize that everything is normal. Same thing goes for when they lead the pack. Take it in short bursts when leading. Aim to lead for a good 1/4 mile or so. Then let your horse go back to following. Anytime the horse picks up a speed you do not like, circle him or her and then ask again for the correct pace. If needed, you can have the other riders stop while you correct your horse. It is good for them to know how to patiently lead and follow.

The most important things are to remain calm, communicate with your fellow riders, and be consistent with your horse.

Oh and you mentioned a loose rein. That is important. I enjoy riding on a loose rein. I have seen riders who hold their horses face on the trail because they will pick up a jog if they let the reins relax. This inadvertantly teaches the horse to ignore that pressure. Horses are all about pressure and release. If you keep that pressure, they will eventually ignore it. So instead, when he picks up that trot without being asked, put him in a tight circle. He will slow down, even if it is temporary, because his hind quarters will disengage momentarily. It is a useful technique called a one rein stop. If the horse picks up his speed, ask for that one rein stop and then ask that he continue to walk. It may take a lot of circles at first, but he will eventually get to be the horse that can walk the trails on a loose rein quietly. Also, this needs to be practiced. So if you have a place to try it out, it is fairly simple to teach. It is basically bending the horse around your leg and asking for those hind legs to cross. Practice practice practice and then when you go out you can be confident that your horse will respond to it on the trail .
     
    03-08-2012, 09:20 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
Consistency. The problems you describe are very typical of horses that are green on the trail. These problems vary from sheer panic when being behind others, to just rushing. These horses just need experience to realize that everything is normal. Same thing goes for when they lead the pack. Take it in short bursts when leading. Aim to lead for a good 1/4 mile or so. Then let your horse go back to following. Anytime the horse picks up a speed you do not like, circle him or her and then ask again for the correct pace. If needed, you can have the other riders stop while you correct your horse. It is good for them to know how to patiently lead and follow.

The most important things are to remain calm, communicate with your fellow riders, and be consistent with your horse.

Oh and you mentioned a loose rein. That is important. I enjoy riding on a loose rein. I have seen riders who hold their horses face on the trail because they will pick up a jog if they let the reins relax. This inadvertantly teaches the horse to ignore that pressure. Horses are all about pressure and release. If you keep that pressure, they will eventually ignore it. So instead, when he picks up that trot without being asked, put him in a tight circle. He will slow down, even if it is temporary, because his hind quarters will disengage momentarily. It is a useful technique called a one rein stop. If the horse picks up his speed, ask for that one rein stop and then ask that he continue to walk. It may take a lot of circles at first, but he will eventually get to be the horse that can walk the trails on a loose rein quietly. Also, this needs to be practiced. So if you have a place to try it out, it is fairly simple to teach. It is basically bending the horse around your leg and asking for those hind legs to cross. Practice practice practice and then when you go out you can be confident that your horse will respond to it on the trail .
Thanks so much I'm glad I was at least doing the right thing by taking him in tight circles when he would start trotting when I asked for him to walk. At first I would pull back more on the reins to get a hold of his mouth a little more because I just recently bought him and had only ridden him once. Maybe it was because he didn't know the trail we were on and a new environment...who knows. I plan on working with him on the ground more this summer and let you know when he comes around and does what I ask of him. Thanks again.
     
    03-08-2012, 10:31 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cmurdock57    
Thanks so much I'm glad I was at least doing the right thing by taking him in tight circles when he would start trotting when I asked for him to walk. At first I would pull back more on the reins to get a hold of his mouth a little more because I just recently bought him and had only ridden him once. Maybe it was because he didn't know the trail we were on and a new environment...who knows. I plan on working with him on the ground more this summer and let you know when he comes around and does what I ask of him. Thanks again.

Oh its no problem. If he is new to you, then this behavior is even more expected. Given time he will come around.
     
    03-10-2012, 06:04 PM
  #5
Foal
Invest a few bucks in a handbook on Amazon "Basic Training for a Safe Trail Horse". This is a no-nonsense book (the reviewer who trashed it never read it) that will give you innovative ideas for teaching a trail horse. You only need patience to be consistent, persistent, and insistent, but then that's what you need for any horse training. The difference in this little book is that you can teach a horse from a close perspective in easy ways without any equipment like lunge lines or sticks! Check it out.
     
    03-10-2012, 06:18 PM
  #6
Trained
It will work, eventually, patience and consistency are the key, and for every mile everyone else goes-you will go 5! Lol
     
    03-10-2012, 11:56 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks guys you all have been so helpful, I appreciate the advice.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trail training references showclothes Trail Riding 2 03-13-2012 09:30 AM
Training a 2 year Old for trail rides i luv my piccadilly Horse Training 17 05-18-2011 09:46 AM
Trail Training Alone Clair Horse Training 10 04-28-2011 08:55 AM
Basic training for trail horses snoggle Trail Riding 21 01-07-2010 10:41 PM
this just in just back from training and our first trail ride Chavez Trail Riding 11 08-27-2009 04:57 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0