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Trailer Loading Problem - Emergency!

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  • Rope cercingle
  • Cercingle

 
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    05-29-2011, 11:49 PM
  #11
Trained
LOL Zena, I find a lunging surcingle and lunge ropes come in very handy around here, you coukd always buy some youngsters to make them worth while
     
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    05-30-2011, 12:30 AM
  #12
Yearling
I had this exact situation minus the hours away from home part, just last month. Eve REFUSED to get into my best friend's 2 horse front load bp. We tried gentle coaxing, firm coaxing, light taps, bigger taps, grain luring, lunging, and whispering sweet nothings to her...nada.

We had 1 person on her head and 2 people on either side behind the trailer - each with a lungeline attached to the opposite side, crossed behind her. Had her within 5 minutes after nearly 2 hours of her PLANTING her feet. Or she'd step in and BOLT out backwards, sometimes hitting her head. Seriously, 3 people and 2 lungelines...5 minutes. Try it before spending $50+ on a cercingle.

Good luck and let us know when you're loaded and safe!
     
    05-30-2011, 09:48 AM
  #13
Trained
Evening, I'm glad this worked for you and many others. It didn't work for me when I was stuck. :(

What I really like about the surcingle and tiedown is that it encourages the horse using the same idea (pressure), but the horse is controlling much of it and the horse can't hit its head, which is what my girl did and is why she is now trailer shy.
     
    05-30-2011, 10:24 AM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by EveningShadows    
I had this exact situation minus the hours away from home part, just last month. Eve REFUSED to get into my best friend's 2 horse front load bp. We tried gentle coaxing, firm coaxing, light taps, bigger taps, grain luring, lunging, and whispering sweet nothings to her...nada.

We had 1 person on her head and 2 people on either side behind the trailer - each with a lungeline attached to the opposite side, crossed behind her. Had her within 5 minutes after nearly 2 hours of her PLANTING her feet. Or she'd step in and BOLT out backwards, sometimes hitting her head. Seriously, 3 people and 2 lungelines...5 minutes. Try it before spending $50+ on a cercingle.

Good luck and let us know when you're loaded and safe!
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    05-30-2011, 10:28 AM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by zena 2008    
Posted via Mobile Device
Thank you so much for the info. I will try the least expense to the more expensive first.Everyone has really helped.
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    05-30-2011, 01:11 PM
  #16
Showing
You will likely find the more open stock trailer works better. Do not force her to load or she may wind up injuring herself so badly you have to put her down. Walk her around the trailer and let her check it out. Open the door and encourage her to look in but don't ask just yet for her to load. She will remember the fiasco so you will try to keep her relaxed. Many people make the mistake of looking and the horse or standing in the trailer to draw the horse in. Dangerous habit. When you do ask her to load be sure your shoulder are facing in the direction you wish her to go. If she will load only her fronts, run your hand over her shoulder and back then back her out. Walk her about and ask again. If you get in a hurry this will fail. You will work toward getting a hind toe on as well. Always let her stand a few minutes then back her out. By doing this you are playing with her emotions. When she's partway in the trailer she will be tense, then the relief when you back her out - a mental yo yo game.
     
    05-30-2011, 01:50 PM
  #17
Yearling
I completely agree with the approach and retreat method for a horse that's genuinely scared...but in a time crunch where there's sadly not enough time to train as they go, just get her in and deal with it at home where you HAVE the time to back the trailer up to a round pen and place her food and water in it.

For some horses, they just don't like it so they figure they don't have to. Umm, sorry, but no. You're the horse and you go IN the trailer thank you. I have patience for fear or a lack of understanding, if the horse has never loaded then yes, take your time. But for example, Eve just didn't WANT to so she planted her feet and basically gave me the finger!

We used the lungelines that time just to haul her in to get where we were going, and once there spent a couple weeks with a lungeline looped through the front tie ring so when she HAULED back, we had the leverage to be like "naw, you go in still" and yes, she reared and threw a fit, there was potential for her to get hurt. But I see her bonking her head and learning going in quiet is her best option BETTER than me getting run over as she bolts backwards out of the trailer for no reason. I understand being patient and doing things the "right" way, but my safety comes first and she was being dangerous simply because she didn't feel like loading. Not acceptable.

Sorry for the mini rant, just had to clarify that this method was not used on a scared horse...merely a stubborn one.
     
    05-30-2011, 03:59 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by EveningShadows    
I completely agree with the approach and retreat method for a horse that's genuinely scared...but in a time crunch where there's sadly not enough time to train as they go, just get her in and deal with it at home where you HAVE the time to back the trailer up to a round pen and place her food and water in it.

For some horses, they just don't like it so they figure they don't have to. Umm, sorry, but no. You're the horse and you go IN the trailer thank you. I have patience for fear or a lack of understanding, if the horse has never loaded then yes, take your time. But for example, Eve just didn't WANT to so she planted her feet and basically gave me the finger!

We used the lungelines that time just to haul her in to get where we were going, and once there spent a couple weeks with a lungeline looped through the front tie ring so when she HAULED back, we had the leverage to be like "naw, you go in still" and yes, she reared and threw a fit, there was potential for her to get hurt. But I see her bonking her head and learning going in quiet is her best option BETTER than me getting run over as she bolts backwards out of the trailer for no reason. I understand being patient and doing things the "right" way, but my safety comes first and she was being dangerous simply because she didn't feel like loading. Not acceptable.

Sorry for the mini rant, just had to clarify that this method was not used on a scared horse...merely a stubborn one.
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    05-30-2011, 04:19 PM
  #19
Yearling
I agree with most of the posters that you would use different methods for a stubborn horse. I wouldn't cause pain regardless, since that will just create fear where there wasn't already fear.

For my stubborn one, I've used the tie loops inside the trailer and a long cotton rope (and gloves) and done the advance/retreat method. I ask for forward motion, and relieve all pressure on the halter with any forward motion; I also use a rope halter so they know I mean business, which works better than a nice flat nylon halter they can lean on. (I switch to nylon for trailering when they're inside, or leave the nylon one underneath the rope halter...) By looping the lead rope through the tie loop, it gives you a little leverage and you can kind of snug it up as they walk in, so that you don't lose ground. This was the only way I could get one of mine to load into a straight load without an emergency exit...I could be on the other side or on the ground and still be able to pull on the lead rope to encourage the horse to move forward. I used a 30 foot cotton lunge line for this...

But the most important thing was to reward each honest try of the horse with a release of pressure.
     
    05-30-2011, 05:22 PM
  #20
Showing
Yikes I'm not sure I would want to restrict a horse's head with a tie-down while in an already potentially dangerous situation... The horse's neck is their balancing tool, they need it in case they get into a situation where they need their necks to balance - such as in the situation described by the OP. If the horse rears with a standing, it is MUCH easier for them to lose their balance and flip - creating a more dangerous situation.
What I've done in the past is get two people on either side of the horse and link arms (looser, in case you have to get out of the way) and stand so close that the horse can't get much power at all behind the kick if they are to kick - experienced people only should attempt this. It is used a lot with problem gate loaders at the track - lots of youtube videos will illustrate the concept. You can also use a lunge line to get the same heave-ho butt idea going - again only if the person attempting it has done this before or knows how to stand.
Please consider not restraining the head at all though - in my opinion that is making a dangerous situation much worse. You can buy head bumpers or horse helmets at most tack stores that will lessen the blow if they do hit their heads.
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