Trailer Loading... tips and tricks? - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Trailer Loading... tips and tricks?

This is a discussion on Trailer Loading... tips and tricks? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-23-2009, 10:22 PM
      #31
    Weanling
    To the OP: I'm with everyone else who said personal confidence is everything. When I load my horse, I walk straight on at a brisk walk, no nonsense, and I never look back at him. 99% of the time it works, I assume because he thinks "well, she's so sure that this is what I should be doing, I guess I'll do it". The other 1% of time, when he's just being a fart, I just turn around, walk him in a large circle, and do it again. Don't worry that he wont get on - each and every time you try to load him, start with a clean slate. Don't anticipate him not getting on because he'll pick up on your anxiety and that'll be huge red flags for him. No need for harsh methods or smacking them around, just a no-nonsense approach. It's not a "you have no other option, GET ON NOW", but a "Get on the trailer now, please". Horse's are very intuitive to what people are feeling, and they're great readers of body language. Be confident and sure of yourself. Also, when he does finally get on, make a BIG deal out of it. Rub him and pet and make a huge fuss.

    *I wanted to make it clear that my preferred methods work for a horse who just doesn't want to get on, like mine or the OP's horse. A horse who is genuinely afraid of trailers needs to be handled very gently and made to feel confident before even attempting loading.

    And a side note - not feeding or watering your horse sounds like a good recipe for colic. I've been severly dehydrated before and it's a feeling I wouldn't wish on anyone. I just had to throw in my opinion on that.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-23-2009, 11:02 PM
      #32
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EternalSun    
    To the OP: I'm with everyone else who said personal confidence is everything. When I load my horse, I walk straight on at a brisk walk, no nonsense, and I never look back at him. 99% of the time it works, I assume because he thinks "well, she's so sure that this is what I should be doing, I guess I'll do it". The other 1% of time, when he's just being a fart, I just turn around, walk him in a large circle, and do it again. Don't worry that he wont get on - each and every time you try to load him, start with a clean slate. Don't anticipate him not getting on because he'll pick up on your anxiety and that'll be huge red flags for him. No need for harsh methods or smacking them around, just a no-nonsense approach. It's not a "you have no other option, GET ON NOW", but a "Get on the trailer now, please". Horse's are very intuitive to what people are feeling, and they're great readers of body language. Be confident and sure of yourself. Also, when he does finally get on, make a BIG deal out of it. Rub him and pet and make a huge fuss.

    *I wanted to make it clear that my preferred methods work for a horse who just doesn't want to get on, like mine or the OP's horse. A horse who is genuinely afraid of trailers needs to be handled very gently and made to feel confident before even attempting loading.

    And a side note - not feeding or watering your horse sounds like a good recipe for colic. I've been severly dehydrated before and it's a feeling I wouldn't wish on anyone. I just had to throw in my opinion on that.

    Well, I like to think I'm being pretty confident. I'll try to stay more aware of it, at any rate.

    I did go out to play with him some today, and I got him in the wider stock again after... well, not too much fuss. My friend had a bucket of grain up front and the escape door wide open, and I just sort of walked him toward it. He refused at the entryway, like he usually does, and I just sorta stood there with a little pressure on his halter until he finally put his front feet up after about three minutes. I gave him a handful of grain for that much and a bunch of rubbing, and then he decided to climb up and go after the grain bucket. Inside, we rubbed on him and I brushed him down with his rubber curry (his absolute favorite brush) and gave him a whole bucket of grain and he stayed in there happy as pie. I wanted to load him on again after we took him out, but I had to leave for school. I'll try again tomorrow, if I have a chance. Usually, that's about how his loading goes, except he'll refuse for a longer time, or he'll put his front feet in, throw up his head and hit it, and then refuse to get near the trailer again.
    I don't suppose there's any way to put a tie-down on him without a saddle, is there?
         
        04-23-2009, 11:06 PM
      #33
    Weanling
    You could tie it to a girth you made from baling twine..... obviously kidding but I've actually seen this happen!
         
        04-23-2009, 11:16 PM
      #34
    Trained
    About the blind-folding... I don't know how he new to step up, but he did. His legs were wrapped and I think he bumped his front legs on it and figured it out. My friend was also telling him "up." Most horses are calm when blindfolded, they can't see and most have the sense to not move. But if you just go up to a random horse you've never met and blindfold him without having built the trust it wouldn't work as well. =]

    You could put a tie down on if you had a surcingle. However, you may not want a bunch of stuff on him when you're trying to load, and you also don't want him to get "stuck."

    I think it was good that you had to go to school. One of the most important parts about training is stopping on a good note. So many people think, "Oh, that was great, let's do it again!" and both you and your horse will get frustrated when it's not as great the next go-around. If you have a chance to load him in the morning and again in the evening that's fine, but I wouldn't do it right in a row so you don't get in an even bigger fight.

    While I don't believe in with-holding food or water, you could put the horse trailer in his pasture, attached to a vehicle so there's no way for the trailer to move, and feed him his grain and hay just inside the trailer. You would have to ALWAYS feed him like that though, that way he can associate the trailer as his source of food. And just gradually put it farther back. You said he will walk in on his own anyway, but now we're just making the trailer a really good thing, because it feeds him.
         
        04-23-2009, 11:48 PM
      #35
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
    About the blind-folding... I don't know how he new to step up, but he did. His legs were wrapped and I think he bumped his front legs on it and figured it out. My friend was also telling him "up." Most horses are calm when blindfolded, they can't see and most have the sense to not move. But if you just go up to a random horse you've never met and blindfold him without having built the trust it wouldn't work as well. =]

    You could put a tie down on if you had a surcingle. However, you may not want a bunch of stuff on him when you're trying to load, and you also don't want him to get "stuck."

    I think it was good that you had to go to school. One of the most important parts about training is stopping on a good note. So many people think, "Oh, that was great, let's do it again!" and both you and your horse will get frustrated when it's not as great the next go-around. If you have a chance to load him in the morning and again in the evening that's fine, but I wouldn't do it right in a row so you don't get in an even bigger fight.

    While I don't believe in with-holding food or water, you could put the horse trailer in his pasture, attached to a vehicle so there's no way for the trailer to move, and feed him his grain and hay just inside the trailer. You would have to ALWAYS feed him like that though, that way he can associate the trailer as his source of food. And just gradually put it farther back. You said he will walk in on his own anyway, but now we're just making the trailer a really good thing, because it feeds him.
    Huh. I guess it just seems a little weird, since I've never really heard of that being done.
    Yeah, I was more or less joking about tying his head down. It just always seems like he hits his head, and then it gets that much harder to load him the next time. My dad says we should find him a helmet, so he won't kill anymore brain cells.
    That actually makes a lot of sense... more so than my uncle's "get the horse in at all costs, take him out, and do it all over again until the horse just loads without a fight" -- I'm usually a little more patient, and consider it a small victory if all I can get is the front feet in a few times, but I've still always gone back and done it again.
    And for feeding him in the trailer... we usually keep a trailer in the pasture year-round -- it's their shelter, really, not counting the forest. We used to keep their mineral blocks or hay up front for them, too, but they'd get inside and get to fighting or something, so I try not to feed them in closed spaces anymore. And we don't really have a way to keep him in his own little pasture for anything longer than a week.
         
        04-24-2009, 08:16 AM
      #36
    Weanling
    Horse Helmet!

    Jeffers® Leather Head Bumper - Shipping Boots / Halters / Bumpers
         
        04-24-2009, 02:27 PM
      #37
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EternalSun    
    They do exist! And they're not big bulky things like I always envisioned!
         
        04-24-2009, 05:08 PM
      #38
    Foal
    I just want to say that I have my own training methods that I have learned from a great horse person who actually learned it from Indians. I believe strongly in what my grandfather tells me and everything he has ever taught me has worked. It may not be your way, but its mine. I do not like to buy a DVD for $40 to watch a man or woman show me how to train my horse.. it may be all good for everyone else... but when I have a horse whisperer that is in my house I am going with him.... Every horse we have ever owned has been awesome... never ever EVER abused... I really want to clarify that.. I love my animals and would never hurt them... My techniques might be outdated but they work for me... and to answer the question of Juniper
    Quote:
    "Curious what a kid could possible do that was naughty enough to be sent to bed without supper. )
    Have you met any of these kids today? And when I did something wrong, lets say I didn't do my homework... no homework no dinner.. that is the way it was.. I was raised in a very VERY old fashioned household.. chores were to be done everyday before and after school, no tv or phone until chores and homework were done... I got spanked.... I was raised obviously different than a lot of people on here... and I train different... We all have our own ways...
         
        04-25-2009, 11:21 PM
      #39
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EternalSun    
    To the OP: I'm with everyone else who said personal confidence is everything. When I load my horse, I walk straight on at a brisk walk, no nonsense, and I never look back at him. 99% of the time it works, I assume because he thinks "well, she's so sure that this is what I should be doing, I guess I'll do it". The other 1% of time, when he's just being a fart, I just turn around, walk him in a large circle, and do it again. Don't worry that he wont get on - each and every time you try to load him, start with a clean slate. Don't anticipate him not getting on because he'll pick up on your anxiety and that'll be huge red flags for him. No need for harsh methods or smacking them around, just a no-nonsense approach. It's not a "you have no other option, GET ON NOW", but a "Get on the trailer now, please". Horse's are very intuitive to what people are feeling, and they're great readers of body language. Be confident and sure of yourself. Also, when he does finally get on, make a BIG deal out of it. Rub him and pet and make a huge fuss.

    *I wanted to make it clear that my preferred methods work for a horse who just doesn't want to get on, like mine or the OP's horse. A horse who is genuinely afraid of trailers needs to be handled very gently and made to feel confident before even attempting loading.

    And a side note - not feeding or watering your horse sounds like a good recipe for colic. I've been severly dehydrated before and it's a feeling I wouldn't wish on anyone. I just had to throw in my opinion on that.
    I have a similiar loading problem with my mare. She just doesn't want to load. I'll work with her for ever, then all of a sudden she realizes what the heck and just walks right in like it's nothing. As for the walking in ahead of the horse, we have a 2 horse straight load trailer with a divider. There's not enough room in one side for you and the horse so usually I have to get on one side while trying to load her in the other. We usually just resort to feeding the lead rope through the front window while my dad holds it and I get behing her and pressure her in. Any suggestions to this kind of trailer? I will admit that I don't have a lot of experience loading and so I've not had to really deal with problems loading before. Please help.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Trailer Loading Training...Advice? Velvetgrace Horse Training 14 02-10-2009 02:48 PM
    Tricks and tips on getting your standardbred to canter whitetrashwarmblood Horse Training 13 10-26-2008 01:00 AM
    Loading HrsGrl323 Horse Training 5 07-18-2008 10:17 PM
    Loading into trailer - DIFFERENT problem kitten_Val Horse Training 16 05-25-2008 03:09 AM
    Trailer loading problems john2srep Horse Training 8 12-07-2007 11:09 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:39 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0