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Train or Sell

This is a discussion on Train or Sell within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        02-28-2013, 02:12 PM
      #11
    Showing
    I have to agree with SR. Many folks who don't have training experience can turn out a horse that is mostly ride-able if the horse is calm and tolerant...but that doesn't always equate to a desirable horse.

    If you are wanting to learn how to train a horse, then you need to get a trainer that is willing to work with both you and the horse. That gives the horse the best chance of getting proper training...and it minimizes the chance of you getting hurt by making a big mistake just because you didn't know it was a mistake.

    Believe me, sitting on a horse and having him just stand there doesn't always mean that he'll be a cinch to train. I've been on lots of horses that would stand there calm as you please or walk around like an old plug with a rider, but the instant you asked for something more, you suddenly had a rodeo bronc on your hands.

    Someone without training experience wouldn't be able to recognize the signs of something about to happen...and wouldn't have any idea of what to do when it did happen.
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        02-28-2013, 02:21 PM
      #12
    Started
    Wow sorry Off topic But I just saw your avi Awesome she looks k=like she is coming right along
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    I have to agree with SR. Many folks who don't have training experience can turn out a horse that is mostly ride-able if the horse is calm and tolerant...but that doesn't always equate to a desirable horse.

    If you are wanting to learn how to train a horse, then you need to get a trainer that is willing to work with both you and the horse. That gives the horse the best chance of getting proper training...and it minimizes the chance of you getting hurt by making a big mistake just because you didn't know it was a mistake.

    Believe me, sitting on a horse and having him just stand there doesn't always mean that he'll be a cinch to train. I've been on lots of horses that would stand there calm as you please or walk around like an old plug with a rider, but the instant you asked for something more, you suddenly had a rodeo bronc on your hands.

    Someone without training experience wouldn't be able to recognize the signs of something about to happen...and wouldn't have any idea of what to do when it did happen.
         
        02-28-2013, 02:22 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    "He said I may not like the horse when I am done with him."

    If this is what your trainer really told you man I don't know about everyone here but I would be a little concerned about that. What is he going to do that would make a non-riddable horse you like into a riddable horse you wouldn't like. I would ask some quesiton of this trainer before bringing a horse to him.

         
        02-28-2013, 02:23 PM
      #14
    Showing
    Thanks, CS. She really is such a smart and willing little filly.
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        02-28-2013, 02:40 PM
      #15
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by heathermstalnaker    
    My trainer I have locally is offering the first month $600 and the 2nd month $500 and he will stay at his place which is about 2 miles up the road but he can't guarantee anything. He said I may not like the horse when I am done with him. He said some have spent the money and just don't like the horse and then they are out even more money. My boss loves this pony and really wants him and is willing to train him but he can't guarantee he will keep him forever either so who knows where he will end up later and I don't have a guarantee he will be cared for like I will.
    What trainer would say that? Sounds a little shaddy. So you're supposed to hand over $1100 for a horse that he's already setting you up to be disappointed in come two months time? Trainers don't say you might not like the horse when done training (which is a big steaming pile to begin with because horses are always "training" everytime you get on/handle them.) Trainers say things like "what do you want to get out of him" Are there any specific problems you're having?"

    I guess I'm confused by the second part, you want to sell the horse, but you want to control of what happens to him after you sell him?
         
        02-28-2013, 02:54 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
    "He said I may not like the horse when I am done with him."

    If this is what your trainer really told you man I don't know about everyone here but I would be a little concerned about that. What is he going to do that would make a non-riddable horse you like into a riddable horse you wouldn't like. I would ask some quesiton of this trainer before bringing a horse to him.


    Just a statement like that would make me high tailin' it the other way.
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        02-28-2013, 03:13 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Yeah the comments he made do made me really concerned!

    As for the other confusion...I wasn't saying that if I sold him I still wanted to control what happened to him. That would be cray. LOL....I was saying that is why I would rather keep him and do what is best for him so I knew he would be cared for and have the best life.
         
        03-01-2013, 08:33 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    "He said I may not like the horse when I am done with him."

    I can understand why a trainer might say that. Being out here in VA, off-track race horse rescues are a dime-a-dozen. Poorly qualified people (not saying you are in this category) are always taking them in, in poor condition, docile, weak, out of the goodness of their hearts, then finding out after several months of feeding and work, that they just can't handle the horse, regardless of training. If the trainer is your friend, he/she is simply trying to brace you for what could happen, since you are inexperienced. This is a young horse and you are going to run into young horse stuff with him, particularly after he's back to full health. I can tell by your comments that you would be more comfortable with an older, solid-broke, horse than a young buck. What your trainer told you is not so much a reference to how the horse might turn out after training, as it is to your being able to handle and work with a young, energetic, "teenager" of a horse once it is healthy and trained.

    Second point to think about is your attachment to this particular horse. Horses are different than, say, a stray dog or cat you might take in. Horses can really hurt you, accidentally or on purpose. People sometimes become so emotionally attached to a horse that they put their own safety at risk. Those kind of people end up keeping bad horses, or horses they can't handle, simply because of emotional attachment, and end up with an unhappy experience for both the horse and owner, and both will be unhappy as long as that relationship exists.

    Horses are not like children, that you have to keep no matter what. Once you have sold, passed-off, or otherwise gotten rid of a bad horse, the guilt feelings will simply disappear the first time you step up onto your next "good" horse. Poof! They're gone. And your feelings for a horse that's "right" for you will be immeasurably greater than for one you can't handle.

    If you really want to enjoy horses and your relationship with them, remember a simple rule: "There are too many good horses out there to keep a bad one." This is something I have struggled with over the years. I am one who tends to get emotionally attached to my animals. I learned the above rule from a very old cowboy. I have tried to incorporate it into my psyche. It's hard.

    Third point that comes to mind is that I completely agree with CowboyBob. Despite what a lot of people say, perfectly good riding horses have been broke and trained by people who have no more knowledge or experience than yourself. It's not going to be a show horse, because you are not a show trainer, but you can learn to teach the horse what you need it to know, if you are willing to learn.

    Fourth thing is...where are you? I'm in Stafford, VA. If you are close, I'm more than willing to help.
         
        03-01-2013, 08:57 AM
      #19
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
    "He said I may not like the horse when I am done with him."

    If this is what your trainer really told you man I don't know about everyone here but I would be a little concerned about that. What is he going to do that would make a non-riddable horse you like into a riddable horse you wouldn't like. I would ask some quesiton of this trainer before bringing a horse to him.

    Totally agree. When I send one of mine to a trainer, first I choose carefully, and make clear what it is I expect, so that BEFORE I pay the $$ we have some agreement as to the goals of the training. After that, as far as I am concerned-it is the trainers job to make that happen to the best of their ability. I am one who is there nearly every day, since I want to watch and learn too, and if there is an issue, the trainer needs to let me know, as well as what the plan is to get through the obstacle. Generally speaking, I am paying the trainer to give me a horse I will like when they are done. If not-they have not done their job. If they start out telling me I might not like what I get, I would take my $$ down the road. JMHO.
         
        03-01-2013, 10:32 AM
      #20
    Foal
    thenrie..I totally agree with you on all levels! I really do have a connection with this horse and he is very sweet and very smart....He has never done anything out of like since I have had him. Just very laid back and just go with the flow. I think with some training he will be awesome. I am willing to do the work but I am just not sure I know what I am doing. I know how to ride and I know all about ground work but as for training to ride...that is out of my element.

    I am located in Waynesboro, VA. I believe that is about 2 hours from Stafford.
         

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