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    11-26-2012, 07:53 PM
  #1
Yearling
Training

My Horse has been ground trained. She is a yearling quarter horse ( you can see pics in my horses, she is the only one) Now that winter has approached it is getting colder. I am not riding her or saddle training her yet.

What I am here for though is your opinions on what I can do with her during the winter. I already take her for walked around the yard and down the road... but is there anything else I can really do with her until spring when she will be saddle broke?
     
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    11-26-2012, 08:26 PM
  #2
Started
Tell me about what you consider ground trained. Like what all does that entail for you? Tell me about what you taught her on the ground so far and I'll see if I can suggest more for you to do with her.
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    11-26-2012, 08:39 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Yes, what Peppy said -- to expand a little:
Can you yield her hind and fore quarters? Are you able to move her front, back, left and/or right easily? Have you worked on giving to pressure, bending, being flexible? Are you able to maneuver her over, around various obstacles (tarps, *bridges*, over ground rails, between them), etc? Have you worked on desensitization? Has she got a solid tie? Are you able to manipulate feet, mouth, ears w/no resistance?
     
    11-26-2012, 09:29 PM
  #4
Started
You could just let her sit and be a baby. Get her out every couple of days to reinforce what she knows and then let her focus on eating and growing.
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    11-26-2012, 09:32 PM
  #5
Yearling
Her ground training:

- pick up feet (all 4)
- yield fore quarters and hind quarters
- walk over and between a variety of objects
- flexing her neck
- backing up ( with and without pressure)
- desensitized to balls, ropes and stick and string
- lets me touch her ears no problem, throw stuff on her, has had tiny pressure on her back
- can touch her mouth, see her teeth and deworms great.
- leads well
- knows whoa ( voice command and pressure)
- knows more... if you want to know more, just say!

Is there anything else I can do with her?
     
    11-26-2012, 09:33 PM
  #6
Yearling
Her ground training:

- pick up feet (all 4)
- yield fore quarters and hind quarters
- walk over and between a variety of objects
- flexing her neck
- backing up ( with and without pressure)
- desensitized to balls, ropes and stick and string
- lets me touch her ears no problem, throw stuff on her, has had tiny pressure on her back
- can touch her mouth, see her teeth and deworms great.
- leads well
- knows whoa ( voice command and pressure)
- knows more... if you want to know more, just say!

Is there anything else I can do with her?
     
    11-26-2012, 10:05 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer    
You could just let her sit and be a baby. Get her out every couple of days to reinforce what she knows and then let her focus on eating and growing.
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Much agreed.

It's great that she knows a lot of basic work on the ground. Winter is a great opportunity to stick young horses out in the paddock with a bunch of other youngsters, to grow, play and develop. Once the weather warms up, bring her in again and you can start mouthing and driving her.
     
    11-26-2012, 10:10 PM
  #8
Yearling
Yep, just give her a break, wont hurt her and will probabbly do her good.
     
    11-26-2012, 10:56 PM
  #9
Started
Sounds like if she is doing all those things well then she has got a great foundation to build off of till you decide it's time to break her to ride. I wouldn't want to do too much else with her. I teach my colts those things then they get a break for a bit. Right now Jet and Jackpot now that they have a pretty well rounded education I just mostly let them stay in the pasture. I visit them everyday in the pasture and I pet and talk to them maybe ask them to join up and follow me a bit. Every once in awhile I halter them up practice the things they've been taught for a refresher then I'll put them up. I think your at this stage as well. Jet turns 2 in the summer so around spring time ill start putting a saddle on him put and bit in his mouth and teach him to yield to bit pressure and then once he's a big enough two year old I may sit on him from time to time maybe walk him around the yard some. Maybe take him to barrel races with me and pony him around all the horses and noise from time to time. Then once he's 3 I'll get more serious about his training. So for now I say just enjoy your young filly.
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    11-27-2012, 02:02 AM
  #10
Yearling
You've done about all you can do with her for now. You might just want to turn her out and mess with her once a week or so. I did everything you did with my now 2 1/2 year old. When she was about 20 months, I turned her out to pasture with other babies her age. Man it made a huge difference!!! I never thought just turning them out to be horses could be so good for them. It really has made a huge difference in my filly, she's a lot more mature minded now. If you can, you should try to board her with other horses. You can still mess with her once in a while, but it will be the best thing you've ever done with her. You've done great getting your ground work down, now just let her grow up physically and mentally. I know it's hard!!
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