Training Barrel Racing.
 
 

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Training Barrel Racing.

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  • Crazy legs quarter horse mare
  • Barrel racing a horse with thin legs

 
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    06-13-2007, 01:57 PM
  #1
Foal
Training Barrel Racing.

I'm supposed to go look at an appendix quarter horse mare, and a buckskin quarter horse gelding tomorrow, the gelding is mostly a pleasure horse and the mare is green broke and basically in hunter training. The mare is going for a ridiculessly good price, and I've worked with green horses before, the owner said she's never had an wester saddle on her, but she doesn't know if the previouse owner has, and I didn't really get much out of the geldings owners since they sent him right off to training as soon as they got him.


The mare is 6, 7 at oldest from what the vet says, and the gelding in 4, both are appearently grade.

First who would be the better barrel prospect, and how would we go about training?

Btw. The mare is 950 negotiable and the gelding in 1200 firm.
     
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    06-13-2007, 02:28 PM
  #2
Yearling
First of all, you really need to see both horses first before being able to compare them as barrel prospects.

Second, why are each of these horses being sold - barrl racing is already a very high adrenaline sport for both horse and rider - if these are not level headed animals before going into barrel training, you may end up with some nasty vices related to barrel racing.

Third, once you see these horses - what are their heights? What are their builds? How do they move? How do they respond to your legs and the bit? What are their minds like (calm? Willing? Nervous? Stubborn? Mean? Affectionate?)? How are their feet and legs (very important - very high impact sport)? Does either horse have a history of injury or sickness?


Both appendix and regular quarter horses can make fabulous barrel horses depending on the above and other characteristics. Both types of horse might also make horrible barrel horses depending on the above characteristics. You really need to see and ride these horses. Try to bring along someone who has some experience training barrel horses to help you examine them.

Training barrel horses can be done in many different ways, and can often depend on how the particular horse moves and runs. My best advice for this is to make sure the horse knows all of the basics of riding really well, and is really supple. A horse may have learned all of the basics in english (it doesn't really matter what discipline they learned through as long as they are responsive and supple). If you have not trained a barrel horse before - take lessons or hire a trainer to help you - it would not be easy to learn over this forum.

Don't write off the horse who has only done english just because of that - it might have a much better foundation that the other horses and be ready to train on barrels. If you plan on doing the whole training process for barrels, prior discipline isn't a big deal. Do be aware though, that some horses do english or western specifically because that is what they are built for. I have a gelding that was a horrible barrel horse, but has turned out to be a fabulous jumper.

Good luck - barrel racing is fun :)
     
    06-13-2007, 03:21 PM
  #3
Foal
I've never ran barrels myself, but a close friend has, and she was going to help me with training.

I'm actually supposed to go a look the them both tomorrow, since they are both relively close to where I live.

The mare is 14.2 Hands, and the owners of the gelding say he's just at or under 15 hands.

I'm looking forward to going to see them but I have an issue, as I'm 17 I have to have someone come with me, neither of my parents have an interest in horses, so they refuse to come, I'd like to have my friend taylor come, but she's working-- so I think I may have my grandmother come with me, she's not a horse person, but she'll be a chaperone, she barely speaks english actually, I called her today while I was looking at halters at TSC and she was like "What wrong witchuuuuu you no want horse, you want carrrrrrr!" and then I explained to her that I had a car, and that's why I could go see, and she was like "ewwwwwwweeeerrr so silly, a horse, whatish wrong witchu". I think she's crazy which makes me nervous..
     
    06-18-2007, 03:03 PM
  #4
Foal
First you need to look at what conformation is! Conformation describes the physical qualities of a horse that can show a great deal about that horse’s health and ability to withstand physical exertion. With a trained eye, you’ll be able to look over a horse carefully and tell whether or not the gelding & mare have good conformations and will be a good fit for what you want to do with them, witch in your case is barrels! To put it more plainly to you, a horse with good conformation is one who looks as though all of his or her parts belong together.

Now it is kinda hard for me to go by hear-say on this because the conformation of a horse is so important for a good barrel prospect, but I can tell you right now pleasure & barrel racing are very different sports! The qualities in a pleasure horse should appear calm and gaits should be slow but not lazy. The neck should be carried in an attractive arch and the nose should not be lower than the chest. As for barrel horse qualities are almost completely opposite. See where im going on this?

Another thing, it is better to have a lazy green broke horse to start barrels on than a horse that is crazy, wild green broke! This is a true fact, because you can always up the speed on any horse with the right cues & training, but trying to train an overly excited green broke horse to calm down enough so they learn anything, is going to be way over your head for not only you, but a lot of people. Ya I know it is common to see out of control, crazy horses underneath their riders, and this don’t have to be the case to win. In fact, the well-trained, intelligent, quiet horse will outlast that wild one and create more wins for his rider.

Id also like to add that it is a good thing that your getting a horse that needs trained for barrels, over a horse that is already trained for barrels. Horses that are already trained for barrels are barrel hungry, they see a barrel & they want & need to do that pattern! This can be very dangerous if you are not ready to go, & the trained barrel horse will try everything to get to do that pattern such as raring, bolting & kicking out! So a main pointer in training a horse for barrels is don’t only do the barrel pattern!!! Take them on road rides, trails, pasture riding, & even ride past the barrels! Yes I said past the barrels, so the horse knows that he don’t always have to go, go, go, when he sees a barrel!

It would be very helpful if when you go see these two horses & ride them that you take some pictures!! Because like I said, it is very hard to go by just hear-say!
     
    06-18-2007, 08:39 PM
  #5
Foal
I bought a barrel horse last summer. I was scammed into thinking she was a perfect barrel horse, and I was told amazing stories. I didn't have a vet check her, I didn't get my trainer to look at her, I just bought her on the spot first time seeing. What an idiot. :roll:

They are right though, conformation is very imporant. The horse I bought had extremely long fetlocks and thin legs which opened her right up for navicular if I had ridden barrels with her.

But that wasn't the case - I didn't get a chance to do barrels. The first the I tried to get on at my barn I got off very quickly. She wasn't trained I found out, and the guy has drugged her up the day I rode her. She was barely broken to be sat on, and not for long. I eventually tamed her but you have to be careful. But that's be side the point, although you should be careful about such things.

Why don't you find yourself a good trainer? I'm sure they'd be happy to occompany you. But never settle for the first bargain. Also, I think it might be beneficial for you to take lessons on other horses before you buy your own barrel horse to train. A green rider at something and a green horse combined makes black and blue!
     
    06-18-2007, 10:36 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewinderrr
I bought a barrel horse last summer. I was scammed into thinking she was a perfect barrel horse, and I was told amazing stories. I didn't have a vet check her, I didn't get my trainer to look at her, I just bought her on the spot first time seeing. What an idiot. :roll:

They are right though, conformation is very imporant. The horse I bought had extremely long fetlocks and thin legs which opened her right up for navicular if I had ridden barrels with her.

But that wasn't the case - I didn't get a chance to do barrels. The first the I tried to get on at my barn I got off very quickly. She wasn't trained I found out, and the guy has drugged her up the day I rode her. She was barely broken to be sat on, and not for long. I eventually tamed her but you have to be careful. But that's be side the point, although you should be careful about such things.

Why don't you find yourself a good trainer? I'm sure they'd be happy to occompany you. But never settle for the first bargain. Also, I think it might be beneficial for you to take lessons on other horses before you buy your own barrel horse to train. A green rider at something and a green horse combined makes black and blue!
Very sad story but it does happen, & alot more often then you may think. Don't just buy one of these two horses JUST because they are "pretty" or "nice to pet"! How old is your friend that runs barrels? If they are old enough witch may be around 19-20 hopfully alot OLDER! But anyways make sure they have a vet come out also & get the vet to sign a paper saying if the horses are sound or not! Because if you don't take the right percausions then you can get scamed & it will be no ones fault but your own!
     
    06-18-2007, 11:11 PM
  #7
Foal
Well technically Ii have two barrel friends, my step-dads step-mother, who rode and trained barrels horses for an incredible amount of time (she's in her fourties) and my friend taylor, who I work with, she's my age (17). I got some bad news though, my mom is getting married the 7 of next month, and I had been planning on making a purchase before then, but mom told to litterally stop-- that if I waited until after the wedding she'd help me financially, I've set a new goal however, before the end of summer.

I'm assuming both horses are sold, since I called the Appendix mares owner to re-schedule and she has't gotten back to me in 3-4 days, and I completly stopped with the buckskin simply because the owners called him flashy and spooky, which makes me wonder if he's priced for his looks, and at this point, I'm not paying for a good looking horse, because I don't just plan on looking at it =].

The search continues.
     
    06-18-2007, 11:42 PM
  #8
Foal
I would sugest you go to some sites & you can usually find some awsome horses! Here are some links to horses for sale all over the U.S. Maybe it will bring you some luck!

www.equine.com
www.dreamhorse.com
www.horsetopia.com
www.barrelhorses.com
www.equinehits.com
www.equinenow.com
www.agdirect.com
www.horseville.com
www.netequine.com
www.horseweb.com
www.freehorseads.com
www.myequinesource.com

And that's just to name afew! :P
     
    10-07-2007, 12:12 AM
  #9
Yearling
Training barrels is fun! If you have a great horse.

I started training my gelding at 8 yo for barrels. I know alot of barrel horses that were mid-late teens before being trained and they are 1d-2d horses. Poco (my gelding) will ace barrels, however, he got too much into them. His soul purpose was to race I didnt want that. I wanted to trail ride, do obstacles, etc. Not with him. He wanted to race. On day I was trail riding along the road and he decided (because he seen a barrel) he was going to run. He ran across the road, infront of traffic. No more barrels for him. Now, he is a pet. I trail ride and he is calmer than ever and he will probably never run barrels again. A barrel horse needs a good foundation. Mentally and physically. They need decent size feet for good footing and shorter cannons. Typically smaller horses are better for smaller arenas and horses closer to the 15.2-15.3 mark are superb in larger arenas. It all depends on where you are, who you are racing against, and what kind of competition. Mares are usually known for speed, geldings for being docile, and stallions for the attitude. (or so the older folks say) Either way the horse needs to be level headed. Have great ground manners and be very alert. Ride the horse. Feel the way they turn, how sure-footed they are, and their ability to connect with you, as the rider. Watch their headset and the way they carry themselves. Alot of training is involved with the hind quarters and the shoulders. When you train let the horse see the barrels once, maybe twice a week. Don't over do it because they will pick up some very bad vices and alot of them are unchangable. Fighting a barrel sour horse on race day is not what you want. Keep your training to the basics. Turns, stops, backing, engaging and disengaging of the hind quarters. Lead changes, going over poles,any work that will improve a horses footing. Running your horse around barrels full speed is for race day. You want them eager to do it. Keep the suttleness for training. I wish the best of luck to you.
     
    10-08-2007, 02:34 PM
  #10
Foal
If you are still interested in a barrel horse, I have mine for sell for $1500. I noticed you are in Tennessee, and so am I. I am only selling her due to lack of time. She's only $1500 because she too is grade. She runs a great pattern of between a 16-18 seconds depending on the arena. Let me know if you are interested.
     

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