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Training book suggestions

This is a discussion on Training book suggestions within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Gary lane horse trainer doesn't
  • Horse trainer,gary lane tapping

 
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    08-02-2009, 12:21 PM
  #11
Trained
I brain farted. The book I like is called "Right from the Start".
     
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    08-02-2009, 04:15 PM
  #12
Foal
It sounds like you're somewhat passive with the horse, too, because of your inexperience. It's only natural to not want to mess things up, especially if you hang around in the horse forums and see how people talk about others "screwing up good horses".

You want to understand WHY your horse does/doesn't do something, and you have to learn to "speak horse" to communicate what he should do instead. If you keep trying to speak human, you'll never get anywhere.

Horse training is pretty much follows a particular set of steps no matter who you are. It's like putting your horse through school. There may be different methods of teaching reading, but everyone learns to read by the end of 1st grade. Everyone takes Geometry in 10th grade, American History 11th grade, etc. So the process that your horse goes through is kinda the same. We have different teachers and some teachers are better than others, but they're all heading the pupil in the same direction to get the same end result. The books can tell you 1.) what steps you need to take; and 2.) explain how to do some things but they don't always tell you WHY or HOW it works (and that's the important part!). They also don't help you think outside the box when you need it. If you read some psychology books that is worth a lot more than just training books.

As far as the "handy stick" and "harder tapping", kicking (with both feet if necessarly), spurs, pushing, shoving, shouting (if necessary), poking, prodding...all of that (when used without anger) doesn't hurt the horse in the least. They play with each other harder than that. The only time that's ever going to hurt is when you want to hurt that horse. Think of it this way: that horse probably weighs around 1000#. That's a lotta meat! Lol You want to move 1000# of "horse", if the horse doesn't move itself then you're going to have to put some effort behind it. We shout commands across the pen 1.) to get their attention; 2.) they can't hear you; and 3.) they learn by repetition. So a lot of the things you may see are how you get through to a horse. Those aids are like "Hello?...McFly!" instead of "Bueller...Bueller...Bueller...Bueller...anybody.. ." LOL (oh, and one other thing...horses actually WANT more firm...didn't say "mean"...riders because horses are 1000 prey animals that live in the protection of a herd. If they have no herd, they need to feel safe and secure from something/someone else...you.)
     
    08-02-2009, 05:34 PM
  #13
Weanling
I realize that I can't physically hurt her with physical training methods and I do understand that horses get physical with each other to communicate. I guess what I don't understand is how do I "get physical" without her perceiving me as a predator, but instead as a leader? I don't want her to fear me or lose her trust in me. She is an extremely easy going horse and is doing amazingly well with very little training - its like she's a natural. I don't want to ruin that.

My neighbor is too harsh with his horses in my opinion - he can't catch them from the field, but they come running to me. They avoid him and I feel like they see him as a predator. They don't want to be ridden by him because he hits and shoves them when they are "misbehaving" out of fear. After he rode my horse one time a few weeks ago, she avoided all humans for almost a week. How do you make that distinction between being a "firm" rider or trainer and acting like a predator that they will fear?

I guess this is the root of my training troubles. Any suggestions and opinions are appreciated.

Thanks a bunch!
     
    08-02-2009, 07:32 PM
  #14
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by snoggle    
I realize that I can't physically hurt her with physical training methods and I do understand that horses get physical with each other to communicate. I guess what I don't understand is how do I "get physical" without her perceiving me as a predator, but instead as a leader? I don't want her to fear me or lose her trust in me. She is an extremely easy going horse and is doing amazingly well with very little training - its like she's a natural. I don't want to ruin that.

My neighbor is too harsh with his horses in my opinion - he can't catch them from the field, but they come running to me. They avoid him and I feel like they see him as a predator. They don't want to be ridden by him because he hits and shoves them when they are "misbehaving" out of fear. After he rode my horse one time a few weeks ago, she avoided all humans for almost a week. How do you make that distinction between being a "firm" rider or trainer and acting like a predator that they will fear
The trick is to understand the difference between a horse misbehaving out if fear, confusion, or uncertainty, and a horse who is "testing" his position in the pecking order, or simply ignoring you. I would say that your extremely laid back mare is simply ignoring, and would not be adversly affected by increasing the pressure until you get the response you are seeking. I do follow some Clinton Anderson, esp. The groundwork, and it has worked for me on several horses, but you are absolutely right that every horse/rider team is different, and training needs to be flexible. The great thing about natural horsemanship as it exists today is that there's a system for every situation.

A horse never learns when he's afraid, but there are ways to get their attention and "bring them back to Earth" without increasing their stress. Whenever you're working with a horse, make the right thing easy and the wrong thing hard, be consistent, be as gentle as possible and as firm as neccesary. If the horse is afraid, back off and work on something that she understands until she's confident again. If she's being lazy or ignoring you, get the response you wanted (so she doesn't learn that she can "get out of it" by ignoring your request), then reevaluate and decide whether you want to pursue the issue, then act accordingly.

As far as a book I would suggest Cherry Hill's How to Think Like A Horse. Http://www.amazon.com/How-Think-Like-Horse-Understanding/dp/1580178359/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top
Kind of a philosophical book, but full of nuggets of wisdom.
     
    08-02-2009, 11:56 PM
  #15
Weanling
Stupid as it sounds, I hadn't thought of her ignoring me or being stubborn, but I think you hit the nail on the head.
Tonight I was walking her the 1/2 mile up from the neighbor's house to my house. Usually she does very well walking beside me - goes when I want her to, stops when I stop, etc. Well after a little bit she stopped a few times and put her ears up like she saw or heard something up ahead. So after this happened a few times I used some positive reinforcement to move her forward - treats (always worked when training my pooches, right?). It worked pretty well at first, but the problem was that after a few rounds of this, she began to stop constantly. Of course she was stopping so often because she wanted me to keep "starting" her with treats. Once I realized what was happening, I gave her a light swat on the butt with the lead rope - she moved forward just fine after that - faster and without stopping every 3 feet.
I can see the difference between her reacting to something out of fear (there was a very scary, horse-eating, yellow hose on our last trail ride) and her just testing me or being a little lazy as was the case today. I guess I've just been cautious because my neighbor always insists that the horse is just testing you and that you need to be more forceful. I've seen him be wrong (one time it was really an ill-fitting saddle), but force the horse to continue.
Thanks so much for the help! I think I'll give the Clinton Anderson stuff another try.
     
    08-03-2009, 04:25 PM
  #16
Showing
I personally love Clinton Anderson. I noticed he had a bunch of videos on Youtube under DUHorseman
They say whenever you are with your horse you should treat it as a lesson. I guess that's a good way to look at it since they seem to be always testing us
     
    07-28-2011, 01:44 PM
  #17
Foal
I like Gary's Lane Training the Gaited Horse which starts from the beginning and seems to share a very similar philosophy to Larry Whitesell. The combo of Lane's book (which doesn't have much illustrations) and Whitesell's DVDs are my training guides at the moment.
     
    07-28-2011, 04:27 PM
  #18
Yearling
Anything by Cherry Hill is great!
     

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