Training a Greenbroke Mare
 
 

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Training a Greenbroke Mare

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        03-05-2014, 06:17 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Training a Greenbroke Mare

    Hi guys! I've had a QH mare, 12 years old, for approximately two years. Her previous owners had many kids (so she's is not at all skittish around my younger siblings). About 5 years ago (if I can remember correctly) the owners' last kids either moved out or started college. She hasn't been ridden much since then, which has caused her to seem almost greenbroke.

    I'm starting up her training again. We don't have a round pen. I've tried lunging her without the round pen, but that doesn't work very well. My neighbors have a round pen and have offered to let me to train Scarlet there. I would take them up on that offer, but Scarlet has escaped over to their property once, and we had such a difficult time getting her back home. They have horses, and she was easily distracted by them and her new surroundings. I don't want to risk her or anyone getting hurt by taking her back and forth. Do you have any suggestions on training her without a round pen until we are able to get/build one?

    She is very pushy when I'm leading her. She will push up against we with her head and neck and try to get away from me by turning around or walking ahead of me. I've gotten my toes smashed by a few horses before (including her) and don't want it to happen again!

    Oh, and did I mention? She hates the bridle and saddle! She's tried to buck me off before even when someone was leading her.

    Any suggestion would greatly be appreciated! Thanks!
         
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        03-05-2014, 10:22 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melodyhscarlet    
    Hi guys! I've had a QH mare, 12 years old, for approximately two years. Her previous owners had many kids (so she's is not at all skittish around my younger siblings). About 5 years ago (if I can remember correctly) the owners' last kids either moved out or started college. She hasn't been ridden much since then, which has caused her to seem almost greenbroke.

    I'm starting up her training again. We don't have a round pen. I've tried lunging her without the round pen, but that doesn't work very well. My neighbors have a round pen and have offered to let me to train Scarlet there. I would take them up on that offer, but Scarlet has escaped over to their property once, and we had such a difficult time getting her back home. They have horses, and she was easily distracted by them and her new surroundings. I don't want to risk her or anyone getting hurt by taking her back and forth. Do you have any suggestions on training her without a round pen until we are able to get/build one?

    She is very pushy when I'm leading her. She will push up against we with her head and neck and try to get away from me by turning around or walking ahead of me. I've gotten my toes smashed by a few horses before (including her) and don't want it to happen again!

    Oh, and did I mention? She hates the bridle and saddle! She's tried to buck me off before even when someone was leading her.

    Any suggestion would greatly be appreciated! Thanks!
    First, she needs to learn some respect. You said she pushes on you when leading her and so forth? When she pushes on you, give her a wack of the chest with a riding crop/whip anything of the sort. Make her get out of your space. Think that you have a hula hoop around you, and she is not allowed in it until you invite her into it. And when leading and she's pushing on you, she is invading your space. Don't wack her right off. Wiggle your rope, wave your stick, then wack. Eventually when you wiggle, she will get out of your space. As for lunging and such w/o a round pen, get her on a lunge line, use a rope halter, if that doesnt work, get a stud chain, be gentle but firm with it. You need to treat her like she isn't broke and nothing basically imo. Get her lunging good, at wtc, without the saddle. Do this for a week or so. Make sure to teach her to flex and one rein stops. Introduce the saddle. Put it on, and do what she doesn't think your going to do, take it off. Just like that. Then put it back on, make sure it wont come off, and get her out on the line, and lunge her, wtc, change directions, if she is bucking a lot, keep changing directions. When she is calm, bring her in, shake the stirrups, slap the seat of the saddle, on both sides, what you do to one side, do to the other. If she spazzes no big deal, follow her and continue applying pressure (shaking stirrups etc) until she stops and stands still.I only allow bucking the first time, after that there is disipline for it. She needs to be lunged like this for a week or so. Depending on how she is doing. At this point you can introduce a bridle, ground drive if you choose to, I prefer to. And the first time you get on her, have somebody lunge her. She knows the cues on the ground, so that will be familiar therefor helping her. Combine your cues in saddle as the person lunging her asks them from the ground. You may lunge and have somebody else ride if you choose. Change directions often, practice flexing and one rein stops. Do lots of walk, trot, canter transitions. And end it on a good note. Continue doing it like this until she is confident and responsive of your cues and what your asking 100% when the handler is lunging her.Tie up after wards for 30 mins to an hour and let the lesson sink it. I hope this helps.
         
        03-05-2014, 10:36 PM
      #3
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Larissa    
    First, she needs to learn some respect. You said she pushes on you when leading her and so forth? When she pushes on you, give her a wack of the chest with a riding crop/whip anything of the sort. Make her get out of your space. Think that you have a hula hoop around you, and she is not allowed in it until you invite her into it. And when leading and she's pushing on you, she is invading your space. Don't wack her right off. Wiggle your rope, wave your stick, then wack. Eventually when you wiggle, she will get out of your space. As for lunging and such w/o a round pen, get her on a lunge line, use a rope halter, if that doesnt work, get a stud chain, be gentle but firm with it. You need to treat her like she isn't broke and nothing basically imo. Get her lunging good, at wtc, without the saddle. Do this for a week or so. Make sure to teach her to flex and one rein stops. Introduce the saddle. Put it on, and do what she doesn't think your going to do, take it off. Just like that. Then put it back on, make sure it wont come off, and get her out on the line, and lunge her, wtc, change directions, if she is bucking a lot, keep changing directions. When she is calm, bring her in, shake the stirrups, slap the seat of the saddle, on both sides, what you do to one side, do to the other. If she spazzes no big deal, follow her and continue applying pressure (shaking stirrups etc) until she stops and stands still.I only allow bucking the first time, after that there is disipline for it. She needs to be lunged like this for a week or so. Depending on how she is doing. At this point you can introduce a bridle, ground drive if you choose to, I prefer to. And the first time you get on her, have somebody lunge her. She knows the cues on the ground, so that will be familiar therefor helping her. Combine your cues in saddle as the person lunging her asks them from the ground. You may lunge and have somebody else ride if you choose. Change directions often, practice flexing and one rein stops. Do lots of walk, trot, canter transitions. And end it on a good note. Continue doing it like this until she is confident and responsive of your cues and what your asking 100% when the handler is lunging her.Tie up after wards for 30 mins to an hour and let the lesson sink it. I hope this helps.

    Thanks so much! This helps a lot! Since the next few days are going to be cold and rainy, I will start her training Sunday. If all goes well, maybe I will take up my neighbors' offer to using their round pen in a couple weeks. I want to get her to respect me when I am leading her. Maybe that will make it easier for me to bring her over. Thanks again for the info! :)
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        03-05-2014, 10:44 PM
      #4
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melodyhscarlet    
    Thanks so much! This helps a lot! Since the next few days are going to be cold and rainy, I will start her training Sunday. If all goes well, maybe I will take up my neighbors' offer to using their round pen in a couple weeks. I want to get her to respect me when I am leading her. Maybe that will make it easier for me to bring her over. Thanks again for the info! :)
    Posted via Mobile Device
    A roundpen def is a big help if you can use one. But it isnt impossible if you don't have one. Her respecting you leading, and all around will make her easier when you take her anywhere. If she loses her focus when she gets there. Move her feet turn, stop, back up, flex etc. It will get her attention back to you. You are welcome :)
    melodyhscarlet likes this.
         
        03-05-2014, 10:55 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    I would take the neighbors up on using the round pen. Leading her over there, working her and leading her back home is a big difference from her escaping and running around loose. She needs to learn that you can control her feet off the line, then it will be much easier to control them on the line. When she gets distracted in the round pen make her change directions and work harder. When she is paying attention to you she gets to go around a few times and be left alone, no pressure from you. As soon as she looks out of the round pen change her direction, you may have to change her direction every half circle, and regardless make sure you change her direction every two or three circles, that way she will not bored and she will have to be paying attention to you.

    Certainly do not ride her until you have full control of her head, neck, shoulders, ribcage, and hind end on the ground. If she crowds you when you lead her yield her hind end with a lot of hustle, then walk on like nothing happened, let her commit to the mistake then yield her hind again eventually she will figure out it is easier to walk then work. Make her back up, a lot. Horses do not naturally back up so you making her back up away from you is showing her your the dominant one. Once you teach her to back up you can back her every where you want to go, only ask for a few steps at a time then reward her, then back some more. Every time she enters your space without permission move her out of it. If you can get her working well in the round pen you will see dramatic improvement in a short amount of time, the round pen really is the safest way to work with her right now, you both will space to work and your not connected to her which is much safer for you.

    If you just can't get her to the round pen then work in a large paddock, you can put something in the corners to help keep her from getting stuck in the corners. The only other suggestion I have is find someone to help you who has experience starting horses.
         
        03-05-2014, 11:11 PM
      #6
    Super Moderator
    I would never lunge a horse in a stud chain.
    Elana and jamesdean57 like this.
         
        03-05-2014, 11:33 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    i would never lunge a horse in a stud chain.
    I haven't personally but have seen it done. Like with the lunge lines that have a chain on them
         
        03-06-2014, 12:41 AM
      #8
    Showing
    It is instinctive to want to be with other horses. Horses beyond the herd get eaten. You know she's safe but she doesn't.
         
        03-06-2014, 04:19 AM
      #9
    Weanling
    I will lunge with a stud chain if it's on a horse who knows how to lunge, but is tending to lean into the line. I do it in such a way that unless the horse leans into it, he doesn't hit the chain. I will wrap the chain around the nose band of the bridle multiple times so it can't slide around, but isn't tight on the horse's nose. I will then clip the lunge line to the (properly fitted full cheek) bit, and the the loop in the chain. There is enough "slack" in the chain, that unless the bit is pulled more than an inch or two away from the horse, the chain doesn't even change pressure. It helps teach the horse to lunge off just the bit, without leaning on it.

    I won't do this until the horse is responsive and respectful on the lunge line, knows the lunging aids, and is comfortable with a bit. In the start I will clip the line to the bit and the nose band (or a snug fitted halter under the bridle), but if I find the horse is trying to balance off me, we'll put the chain on for a bit.

    NEVER lunge directly off a chain though, and absolutely NEVER put the chain through itself so it tightens around the horses nose. Don't lunge a horse with a chain either without doing ground work with the chain first.

    All that said, I wouldn't recommend lunging with a chain to someone who hasn't done it before, unless they are supervised by some one who has, or a trainer. The more hardware you put on your horse, the more potential for problems to happen. And like I said, unless the horse is already lunging decently and respectfully, they don't wear a chain. It isn't a punishment, it's teaching the horse to carry himself around a circle without laying on the line for balance.
    melodyhscarlet likes this.
         
        03-06-2014, 09:55 AM
      #10
    Foal
    Thank you all!

    Yeah, I've never lunged a horse with a chain before. I don't think my neighbors lunge with a chain either.

    I do have one more question. Say I bring her over to the neighbors', and she realizes the horses are near and starts bucking or trying to take a run for it, what should I do? I would most likely have my best friend with me (her and her sister are both experienced with horses). I realize that I would have to work on her groundwork first before I even try to bring her over there. Do you think that will help with her bolting for it when I bring her over there? Thanks! :)
         

    Tags
    greenbroke, mare, quarthorse, training

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