Training and handling of a 3 year old stallion!
 
 

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Training and handling of a 3 year old stallion!

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  • 3 year old stallion
  • Tips for training stallion

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    07-13-2012, 06:36 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Training and handling of a 3 year old stallion!

I've had Dubai since Tuesday.

Gah, I can't get enough of being around that fella!

He's a quick learner, I'll give him that much, but I'd like to hear any training tips for handling a stud.

He is my first, but I've not run in to this blindly. I had every intention of gelding once I got him home (long story concerning a weird seller) as the vet said there should be no issues when I had the PPE.

Turn up on my yard, and my trainer says 'lets leave him whole as long as he is managable'

My trainer has 5 stallions of her own (stud and ridden) so is well aware of how to handle them, but she's quite ill right now.

I want to lay down the ground rules so we set off on the right foot.

Firstly, he has no idea how to pick his feet up. Today he has twice (once out of box, the other once riding was done) and he's pretty balanced, but no idea. Any tips, great! Once I have his foot he leans, but doesn't kick out etc.

Secondly... the first time I got him out to groom him, his 5th leg was popping out. And boy was he happy to see me. Trainer said sharp smack on the stomach or behind. I'm not a mare. That was the only day he did it, but as soon as someone else gets near him.. doing.. its out! Any tips, or just a time thing for him to learn the respect?


He's superb to lead. He is a very very laid back horse and he walks round the yard like he owns it.

However, every time after a bit of work, leading back in to the stall he whinnies like mad. My dad's mare sets him off. No joke.

Josie: Hey good lookin'
Dubai: OMG NO WAY A GIRL IS TALKING TO ME

I bought a really long, sturdy leadrope with a leather end. I whapped him across his chest and backed him up, then lead straight on- no problems.

Am I doing this right, wrong? My trainer gave me a brief overhaul before she had to go back to bed. She said firm firm firm, make him realise his mistake, reward vocally or pat for good behaviour.

Also, I am the only one to touch his face. Once he's done a good job by working etc, he gets a face scrub.

Any tips, or ground work ideas for him are greatly appreciated!

Thank you
     
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    07-13-2012, 06:52 PM
  #2
Trained
Congrats again!

There are many more people on here that have more experience than I do, but I am sure they will chime in :)

First any horse that leans on me when I have his feet picked up gets a little poke in the ribs to make him stand on his own. At first he will more than likely protest and try to yank his foot away, be persistant.

I don't allow colts to have their pecker out while handling, riding or grooming. Like your trainer I give them a smack so he puts it away. If he wants to play with it on his time fine, but not during my time.

I also reprimand for screaming and hollering. I give some quick tugs on the lead to get his attention or put him to work. I quit backing them up as a punishment because I found with the more persistant ones as soon as they start talking they knew they were in trouble and started backing themselves up which can be dangerous if he isn't paying attention to where he is going, or if someone behind is not aware of what is going on.

Stallions are not difficult to deal with. Just treat him like you would any horse. Make sure he respects you but don't pick at him.
DuffyDuck and Army wife like this.
     
    07-13-2012, 07:03 PM
  #3
Green Broke
I like that ' he can play with it in his own time' they have that as one of their rules too you just worded it far better haha!

I never thought of that...he also backs up any time I ask whether telling off or work with his head in the air...all part and parcel of learning!

I will try just the headcollar and not backing up...if he started that I'd be in big trouble lol


Basically he's got balls as long as he can behave. I really dint want to chop them because I've been incompetent with his training!

Poke in the ribs it is. Trainer said with hind legs try "pulling hoof forward" and use vocals and it was better but jeez front ones I had to lift it on my own he was more than confused.

He does love wormer though! And he was fab for his first jabs!
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    07-13-2012, 07:10 PM
  #4
Yearling
May I ask why you want the bother of keeping him as a stud? Him being a stallion will severely limit his life opportunities and make everything much more complicated for you...
FaydesMom and Ami like this.
     
    07-13-2012, 07:24 PM
  #5
Green Broke
I did write a nice paragraph that my phone decided to delete.

Can I ask what life opportunities he is missing out on, and why is it going to make things difficult for me?
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Army wife likes this.
     
    07-13-2012, 07:28 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuffyDuck    
I like that ' he can play with it in his own time' they have that as one of their rules too you just worded it far better haha!

I never thought of that...he also backs up any time I ask whether telling off or work with his head in the air...all part and parcel of learning!

I will try just the headcollar and not backing up...if he started that I'd be in big trouble lol


Basically he's got balls as long as he can behave. I really dint want to chop them because I've been incompetent with his training!

Poke in the ribs it is. Trainer said with hind legs try "pulling hoof forward" and use vocals and it was better but jeez front ones I had to lift it on my own he was more than confused.

He does love wormer though! And he was fab for his first jabs!
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LOL!

I am so tickled for you! I really hope he works for you, a well mannered and trained stallions can be so much fun!
And if you find you don't want to deal with it, then you can get his "brains" whacked out..tee he..

I agree with your trainer, on the back legs pulling the foot forward and you can stand at a little in front of his flank. This will give you a little more control and if he goes to fight or kick you will be safe. I am sure he will be fine once he understands.
     
    07-13-2012, 07:32 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Two bricks should do the job nicely lol!

He might be docile till he gets fitter! Fields are out of action right now for all the horses, they are flooded and too dangerous, but he gets in the school in the morning and has a shouting match..none of the other stallions bother...obviously he hasn't become s threat to their mares yet lol!
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    07-13-2012, 07:36 PM
  #8
Green Broke
If a horse leans on me while im picking its feet I drop the foot however that's more of " I'm lazy you hold me up" than " I duno what I'm doing" so I agree with a poke or pulling the leg forward both work :)
     
    07-13-2012, 07:40 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Haha if I drop it I'd have ti spend another ten minutes trying to pick it up again!
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    07-13-2012, 07:44 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Yeah haha that's why I said the others are better ideas our horses know to pick up their feet just lean sometimes which the dropping wakes em up lol. Good luck though :)
     

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