Training a Horse the Classical Way - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Training a Horse the Classical Way

This is a discussion on Training a Horse the Classical Way within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-06-2009, 10:01 PM
      #11
    Started
    NorthernMama, your horse just seems so pissed in that picture:P
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-06-2009, 10:33 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Wasn't Joe the horse that you said had been put down in your "bolting" thread?
         
        09-07-2009, 10:53 AM
      #13
    Guest
    Flitterbug - what sharp eyes you've got.

    Yes you are correct - but in my mind he lives on and is not dead until I
    Have forgotten him. I had to make a real decision at the beginning before I started the thread. - you have caught me out.

    I wrote 2 years ago, for my personal pleasure only, about a dozen short stories which describe how Joe passed thru his classical training. This series - incidentally written as a hobby not professionally - covers various issues about training a horse classically. It leaves the reader an opportunity to post a comment but the theme of the thread continues throughout. Each are on the lines of the two posted in the thread so far - hopefully to be perceived as humorous.

    I don't want to give you all the details but at the end there is a sharp lesson which I learned from the process. I haven't decided yet quite how to present that lesson.

    But there again I did not, and still do not, know how a series of short stories presented on the same thread on the same theme would be received. Would readers continue to read, would they comment?

    Horse Forum is a new international medium and I believe to be an important one for the future. But just how is it to be used? I saw this idea as an experiment in presentation.

    I have tried posting threads on the Stories and Poems forums - no one reads them. Somehow articles written on the back page don't get the same readership as those printed on the front page.

    Following up on this Classical riding theme could be presented a series of articles based on what I entitle as "Analysis of an Accident".
    "Post Traumatic Fall Disorder" and then "A Search for a Solution". Finally: "The Big Decision". The articles rest already in the computor awaiting presentation.

    But should I have declared from the beginning that Joe lives on only in my mind? Now, as a result of your post, the question does indeed come to mind. Is he really dead if he still manages to arouse discussions such as this?
    Anyway is he not typical of how a horse worms its way into the mind and heart of a human.

    My wife says - now that I have asked her whether I should have written in the past tense -: "yes - Barry, you should have done",
    Whereas at the time I thought : 'No'. To do that I should have had to start at the end of the series of stories and not the beginning.

    Joe is in any case only an image in any reader's mind who did not know him. Is he still alive or is he really dead?

    What do you think?

    And

    Do I continue with the concept of one thread but several postings from the same writer?

    Incidentally, I am beginning to regard you, affectionately I must add, as my editor.

    Barry G
         
        09-07-2009, 03:38 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    I must admit your posts can be humorous. However, for me, my attention to detail when working with a horse tends to transmit to, and occasionally cause conflict, with all parts of my life. I guess some things are meant to go unnoticed.

    I understand it is a risk you take with how you approach the posting of your already written articles. If it had been me, and I wanted to share my work, I would have let the readers know the background behind the work. To put yourself in the moment with the reader makes it far more interesting to the reader, it puts the situation in "real life", something they can go through with you. Unfortunately, you also put a little more of your integrity on the line, as some people may take the feeling as being guinnea pigs with you being the scientist. Its like watching a scary movie with someone who already knows the ending, it just loses something. Being on the other end of the computer, you could easily take the place of your former self in the stories without anyone noticing, granted that you don't take forgranted the acuity of your readers.

    You also take into account the reader that you are searching for. If you are looking for an audience, or if you are looking to enlighten, advise, spark an interest to ask a question, any of those readers you will get here. Then again, you will also get the other reader, the type of reader who has already been there, the type that will question what you write and may very well know the end of the story already. As for me, I specialize in problem horses, solving problems both mental and physical. To do this properly, classical training takes a large part in the physical realm of rehabilitating a horse. What a lot of people miss is that we have to balance the mental and the physical to truly get the desired result. I have been taught to solve problems from the beginning, find out where that first little catch is and fix it there. Sometimes, this tends to spill out of the horse world and into everyday life.

    I still tell many stories of horses from my past, each and every horse has taught me and helped me to become the horse person I am today. I could go on and on about the one eyed quarter horse mare that I showed in hunters as a child. That was then, I would present it as then. I appreciate you sharing your experiences, but as with horses, I believe that complete honesty from you will result in consistency, with consistency, we find leadership. If you want people to believe your words, they have to trust that what you say is the truth. In your case here, the story very well may be true, but the rest of us aren't going through it with you if you already know the end result.
         
        09-07-2009, 07:24 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Barry,

    For what it is worth, I too had picked up that Joe was a part of your past yet you were writing about him in the present tense. I did not find this confusing or upsetting, nor did it detract from the story you told and (I assume) neither will it from the lesson to be learned at the end. I just figured you were telling a story that truly happened to you and from which you thought we could glean some tidbits of help and humor. It is said that the unexamined life is not worth living, but having devoted the last 6 years of my life to my veterinary education in which I spend endless hours picking everything I see and hear apart, it is nice to sit back and enjoy a well told tale without getting too hung up on the details. And as the story comes from you, I am sure to learn something in the end!

    -mb

    P.s. Your writing style reminds me a bit of James Herriot, with a lot more humor and heart
         
        09-07-2009, 07:35 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Your writing alone is enough to make me read I wasn't aware about past posts about Joe, so I will join you in your mind of the "alive and well Joe" and continue reading if you would continue posting!
         
        09-07-2009, 10:02 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I am of the same mind as Tealamutt and Macabre... please continue with your writings about Joe. I have a feeling he has a lot to teach us whether he still walks this earth or not. I agree that he is still alive as long as he is in your heart... and we are fortunate that you are so gifted with your writing, which will in turn.. make him live on even longer and teach us a few lessons along the way.... next installment please!!
         
        09-08-2009, 02:11 AM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
    contd/
    I don't use either restraints but I admit that I bribe her for compliance.

    So far, I believe it works

    Barry G

    PS DOg handlers have been using treats to ensure compliance for years.

    I say it's about the results not always the methods. We have horses for enjoyment and if giving treats makes it more enjoyable then take advantage of their weaknesses.
         
        09-08-2009, 02:20 AM
      #19
    Trained
    As I have said before I really enjoy your writing regardless of when it was written I am impatiently waiting for your next "update" and I commend you for your sensitivity to horses and to language and writing as well.
         
        09-08-2009, 06:32 AM
      #20
    Guest
    Flitterbug,
    I take on board the integrity issue and I am mindful of your other comments.

    There is seemingly support for me to continue with stories about Joe.
    The stories are all based on fact - situations which developed around
    Joe who was a very individual horse.

    I will change the tense and in any case - the truth about Joe is now out by discussing the issue in the way we have ie openly over the forum.

    Joe taught me over three and a bit years more about the care and management of horses than all the others I have known in my lifetime of riding. He represents an object lesson for any horse rider/owner.

    I get the personal benefit that he stays alive in my mind- others hopefully will get some pleasure from reading the articles.

    Barry G
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Training my own Horse RidingBareback Horse Training 14 07-09-2009 11:24 PM
    Horse Training weefoal Horse Training 20 05-10-2009 05:48 PM
    Training my horse lb_cake Horse Training 11 11-07-2008 08:05 PM
    Horse training Noah13 Horse Training 3 10-21-2008 04:28 PM
    Any Classical Music Lovers out There??? latte62lover General Off Topic Discussion 11 10-11-2007 06:48 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:38 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0