Training Question for real cowboys and girls
 
 

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Training Question for real cowboys and girls

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    03-15-2012, 01:14 PM
  #1
Yearling
Training Question for real cowboys and girls

This is a question for anyone who has made or makes their living a-horseback. I've been thinking about this a lot lately.

I get the impression that when you go to work on your average ranch that they give you a string of horses and expect you and them to be able to go to work right away. Seems to be the opposite of other ideas on horsemanship where you might do a lot of groundwork and spend an extended amount of time getting together with your horse before you ask much of it.

I suspect that it's mostly a matter of being a good enough rider to just deal with whatever happens, but I'm curious as to what kinds of things you guys do to train those horses.
     
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    03-15-2012, 01:40 PM
  #2
Trained
The only outfit I worked for that provided horses had pretty gentle ones. I take in outside horses during the summer so that I have enough horses and don't have to feed so many during the winter and some of them can be pretty bad. Since I'm not any good to anybody with a broken leg or back I take as much time as needed to be safe. If somebody has a problem with that then they can get someone else. There are probably still a few outfits that might run me off for that but after they pay a few worker comp claims they usually change thier ways or buy gentler horses.

Regardless of what outfit you're on you shouldn't put yourself in a position that will get you hurt. No job is worth an injury that may haunt you the rest of your life. If one way to do a job looks too dangerous then find another way to do it.
Ian McDonald likes this.
     
    03-15-2012, 01:55 PM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
The only outfit I worked for that provided horses had pretty gentle ones. I take in outside horses during the summer so that I have enough horses and don't have to feed so many during the winter and some of them can be pretty bad. Since I'm not any good to anybody with a broken leg or back I take as much time as needed to be safe. If somebody has a problem with that then they can get someone else. There are probably still a few outfits that might run me off for that but after they pay a few worker comp claims they usually change thier ways or buy gentler horses.

Regardless of what outfit you're on you shouldn't put yourself in a position that will get you hurt. No job is worth an injury that may haunt you the rest of your life. If one way to do a job looks too dangerous then find another way to do it.
I dig it. I'm also intrigued by your practice of taking in outside horses for doing your job. That's what I should have done instead of buying half the ones I have. Are you mostly day-working? I was under the impression that most of the full-time gigs had their own horses. Actually, I wouldn't mind bringing my own anyway if that were an option.
     
    03-15-2012, 02:02 PM
  #4
Trained
Since the polygs let me go I've mostly been house working! In the summer when I ride for the cattle association I'm my own boss and I handle the taxes and such as an independent contractor so I have to supply pretty much everything. Some ranches want you to ride thier horses but I think more and more would rather have you provide your own so they don't have to deal with the costs involved. Also most ranch owners realize that they can get better hands if they allow them to take outside horses and not starve to death. I made almost as much money last year on outside horses as I did in wages.
     
    03-15-2012, 08:05 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Your right Ian, but most of them have been working already and have been through a few cowboys already. If you are the new guy you might get cut a few colts or some crappy horses....I have a horse that my husband, before we were married, cut to him, then sold and cut to me on a different one. And buck you off of you stopped a steer, got short and stopped him a gain...you got one chance then he tried bucking you off. Branding you had to hold the rope off his butt dragging to the fire...or he would buck. Lol.

That's part of being a cowboy is getting by horses that you don't know that may have some quirks. That's why reading a horse and knowing how to deal with it is the best thing.
And like you said all these clinicians advocate all the time ine the world. In cowboying not so much, It is being able to get that same result somewhat with the least amount of time....or at least to where he is rideable outside.

I have said this before in another thread, the colts got started in a short amount time but taken outside and just by going outside and doing something you would be amazed by how much they learn and how fast. Ususally if they are that green, the boss will rope on a day that is easy and good for them to go.
The mind isnt comprimised like blowed up, but they are usually just snorty on the ground ...no big deal. The safest place to be is on their backs with that kind of pony.
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kevinshorses and boots like this.
     
    03-15-2012, 09:42 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
Your right Ian, but most of them have been working already and have been through a few cowboys already. If you are the new guy you might get cut a few colts or some crappy horses....I have a horse that my husband, before we were married, cut to him, then sold and cut to me on a different one. And buck you off of you stopped a steer, got short and stopped him a gain...you got one chance then he tried bucking you off. Branding you had to hold the rope off his butt dragging to the fire...or he would buck. Lol.

That's part of being a cowboy is getting by horses that you don't know that may have some quirks. That's why reading a horse and knowing how to deal with it is the best thing.
And like you said all these clinicians advocate all the time ine the world. In cowboying not so much, It is being able to get that same result somewhat with the least amount of time....or at least to where he is rideable outside.

I have said this before in another thread, the colts got started in a short amount time but taken outside and just by going outside and doing something you would be amazed by how much they learn and how fast. Ususally if they are that green, the boss will rope on a day that is easy and good for them to go.
The mind isnt comprimised like blowed up, but they are usually just snorty on the ground ...no big deal. The safest place to be is on their backs with that kind of pony.
Posted via Mobile Device
Y'know, I think I may actually be cut out for this deal. I'm glad I met you guys 'cause you've made it pretty clear that this is somethin I'd like to do. It sounds like a kick in the ass. Hell I'm basically living in a camp now, 'cept it's just me and the horses.

Got any advice on riding the buckers? That's kinda my weak spot as a rider and somethin I want to get fixed. I just don't have much experience with it so I'm not sure if I'm supposed to hang on come hell or high water, or lock my knees out or what. Cornering the horse is the only thing I know to do, not so much on how to ride out the storm.
     
    03-15-2012, 11:02 PM
  #7
Green Broke
The outfits I ride for give a little thought to where a horse is with it's skills and what different riders can do for the horse. Sometimes, though, you just have to ride what's available and make do. That's when things can get real creative.

My hub was a rough string rider, so he only rode the ones that bucked or otherwise were kind of rough for some reason. He drew extra pay for that.

I can ride one if it starts bucking, but usually can keep them from starting. That's the best way to ride a bucking horse. Keep him from starting. :) Otherwise I do my cheerful best to get their head up, will sometimes get a little aggressive to get them running instead of bucking (if conditions allow) and lean back a tich and watch which direction their head versus their shoulders are going. If one is a stinker, I am not above adding a nightlatch to my rig and/or pulling leather for all I'm worth. No one is scoring my rides and I've got nothing to prove. Besides, if I come off and get injured, I lose money.
kevinshorses and COWCHICK77 like this.
     
    03-15-2012, 11:21 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by boots    
The outfits I ride for give a little thought to where a horse is with it's skills and what different riders can do for the horse. Sometimes, though, you just have to ride what's available and make do. That's when things can get real creative.

My hub was a rough string rider, so he only rode the ones that bucked or otherwise were kind of rough for some reason. He drew extra pay for that.

I can ride one if it starts bucking, but usually can keep them from starting. That's the best way to ride a bucking horse. Keep him from starting. :) Otherwise I do my cheerful best to get their head up, will sometimes get a little aggressive to get them running instead of bucking (if conditions allow) and lean back a tich and watch which direction their head versus their shoulders are going. If one is a stinker, I am not above adding a nightlatch to my rig and/or pulling leather for all I'm worth. No one is scoring my rides and I've got nothing to prove. Besides, if I come off and get injured, I lose money.
Thanks for the reply. This is really something I want to get good 'cause I want to change this weakness into a strength.

So when you say pulling leather for all you're worth what exactly do you mean by that? Is it just a matter of determination?
     
    03-15-2012, 11:36 PM
  #9
Green Broke
I mean grabbing anything I can to help me stay on. Not very buckaroo-y, but if it's the difference of hiking back to the headquarters or getting a horse to stop bucking, I do it! Lol

I'll grab the horn, saddle strings, mane, tail (! J/k), whatever.

A nightlatch is just a loop of leather (I use a dog collar) that I put through the gullet. I put mine to the right of the horn. I leave it long enough that I can easily slip my hand into it, well just my fingers, but not so long that my knuckles get smashed with every hard landing. Knew a guy that busted a knuckle and he said that must have been what did it.
     
    03-16-2012, 01:01 AM
  #10
Trained
I have learned that if a horse is really bucking and your not going to get his head pulled around in a jump or two it's best to not pull them around. The only thing harder than riding a bucking horse that's going straight is riding one that going around in circles. In all honesty I usually just fall off and start over. If you can get through the first half hour on a horse unless it's a real dink you just about got it made. Especially if your working it pretty hard.

Most of the outside horses I get are spoiled dinks that aren't going to buck but will try **** near anything else to make me miserable. Sometimes I get horses that just haven't been ridden for a while and are perfectly nice horses. I had three or four of them last year. Two of them I would have loved to own.
COWCHICK77 and boots like this.
     

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