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Training Question for real cowboys and girls

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  • Roaring springs ranch, horses

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    03-19-2012, 11:36 AM
  #11
Trained
Also if you have a leather rope strap that buckles(not the rubber chunk that some folks use) you can grab your rope to help get yourself sucked down. Don't look at the ground...just like driving or riding, you end up where you look. So I try to keep my chin tucked and look down the middle of his neck. I am by no means a bronc stomper...But I hate falling off and will cling on for dear life!!!

One of the guys we worked with was a bronc rider so he got cut those crappy ones and the nasty colts. So if he was riding one of those that likes to buck around in a circle. My husband and I would bust in there one on each side to keep them bucking straight so he would be easier to ride if they were tough. Sometimes they will quit bucking if someone rides in and kinda knocks them off stride...or they both start bucking ..lol!
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    03-19-2012, 01:06 PM
  #12
Weanling
I visited the million acre Roaring Springs Ranch in eastern Oregon last year. Their buckaroos are the real deal and can ride anything thus the term Buck a roo. Because of the milage they ride each cowboy does have a string of horses that they are expected to shoe themselves and the shoes don't last long when you are riding as much as fifty miles a day. These guys would probably prefer an unbroke horse to begin with. How long does it take to train a horse when you are riding it 12 hours a day?
     
    03-19-2012, 05:19 PM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliduc    
I visited the million acre Roaring Springs Ranch in eastern Oregon last year. Their buckaroos are the real deal and can ride anything thus the term Buck a roo. Because of the milage they ride each cowboy does have a string of horses that they are expected to shoe themselves and the shoes don't last long when you are riding as much as fifty miles a day. These guys would probably prefer an unbroke horse to begin with. How long does it take to train a horse when you are riding it 12 hours a day?
Don't they have a Branding competition there in the spring?

To answer your question, from my experience, yes the horse gets ridden for many hours that day, but he only gets ridden once a week. And from what I learned is that when you are spending that many hours on them you don't create more work than you have to to save your horse. So you have to use work to train. You don't go out and lope 25 circles on your way out to make a gather. You would wear your horse out and he would be tired by noon. So you use your resources. Teach them to stop good when your turning cattle back, teach them speed control when your roping. Teach them lateral movements opening and closing gates and rolling cattle over when you have something roped. On our easy days on the way back to the barn or trailer we would all do little training sessions as if we were in an arena. Also if I had a day off and had one up that hadn't been ridden I would ride in the barn lot to work on stuff. But that rarely happened.

In my opinion it takes a while. They get "gentle"(I use that term loosely) enough fast because they have to go to work right away. That's when the speed training comes in. We start the colts fast, but right. They may not have a whole lot of ground work and the best place to be is on them, like I said before.

Another factor is how many guys had been riding the horse. If they are on ranch were they hire a new crew every spring and fall then you have quite few guys riding him with different methods and abilities-that's going to slow the process some.

Also in the winter when just feeding cows, everything gets turned out, and I might only keep one horse up for a month before I switch because there isn't a whole lot to do. So if your smart you would keep your young and tough horses rotating through the winter to keep them rode and get them a little more broke. Keep your broke horses turned out to give them a break.

So it really depends on the situation the horse and the cowboy(s).... it may take just a couple of years or it may take several. I have had some in my string that were in the double digits that I still wouldn't consider trained!




Usually your boss will only rope your colts on day that would be good for them as not to "pull their plug". But it may take a little while to get them really solid in a bridle
     
    03-19-2012, 08:18 PM
  #14
Weanling
Ranch horses

If you want to see what kind of horses they make just go to the Bull Sale in Klamath Falls Oregon or Cottonwood California. These horses are dead broke roping horses and they can cut cows too. Genuine ranch horses always sell for a good price. It may be true that they get ridden every 3rd day or so but they are still being ridden over a hundred miles every 10 days. How many hours does the average horse in training get ridden every week. Maybe three hours if you are lucky. They may not be world class cutting horse competitors and certainly are not dressage horses but they are good solid working horses and superb trail horses. You could probably set any baby on one of them.
     
    03-19-2012, 09:29 PM
  #15
Trained
I agree that they make some nice ponies and they fetch a good price(I used to go to both of those sales every year). I think they are an exception not the standard to the average ranch horse. Richard Caldwell's horses don't even go for as much as the Springs horses. I seriously doubt that a horse off the TS or the 25 would go for that much. I agree that good ranch horses go for good money, and the hours gone into them are quite a bit more than an arena horse but my point was that it is what is done in that time and who is riding them is what is important.
     
    03-19-2012, 10:37 PM
  #16
Trained
I agree I've ridden with some guys that could ride a horse for ten years and it still wouldn't know much. I rode a horse that a nieghbor had bought from a ranch that should of had a good handle. The horse could back up and turn around but you couldn't throw a rope off of him because the guy that rode him didin't rope. He would sidepass great but only when you were within arms reach of a gate. Some people ride thier horses like a fourwheeler and don't really care to make them handy so long as thier useful. Ray Hunt told me that the difference between handy and useful is the difference between using a hammer to pound a nail versus using a wrench to pound a nail. Either one will get the job done but one will be a lot handier.
     
    03-20-2012, 08:17 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
Also if you have a leather rope strap that buckles(not the rubber chunk that some folks use) you can grab your rope to help get yourself sucked down. Don't look at the ground...just like driving or riding, you end up where you look. So I try to keep my chin tucked and look down the middle of his neck. I am by no means a bronc stomper...But I hate falling off and will cling on for dear life!!!

One of the guys we worked with was a bronc rider so he got cut those crappy ones and the nasty colts. So if he was riding one of those that likes to buck around in a circle. My husband and I would bust in there one on each side to keep them bucking straight so he would be easier to ride if they were tough. Sometimes they will quit bucking if someone rides in and kinda knocks them off stride...or they both start bucking ..lol!
It sounds like what you're doing is trying to follow the horse's shoulders.

Hope I ain't wearin' you out with all the questions. I'm just tryin' to get a handle on this thing.
     
    03-20-2012, 08:36 PM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
It sounds like what you're doing is trying to follow the horse's shoulders.

Hope I ain't wearin' you out with all the questions. I'm just tryin' to get a handle on this thing.

LOL, nope, not wearing me out. I miss home so I will talk about this stuff any chance I get!

Like I said, I am not a bronc stomper, so I may be totally wrong. Someone else could probably tell you better than me.
But I wouldn't say your trying to follow his shoulders. But a horse or a cow will tell you their next move with their head/or ears. And your just trying to stay in the middle and just behind the withers because that is where there is going to be the least amount of movement as compared to anywhere else you may be sitting. Does that makes sense? I feel like I am talking out my ass on this one!
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    03-20-2012, 08:52 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Bucking is why I love my aussie saddle. Those poleys have kept me in my seat a few times when Hunter decided he was going to start bucking.
     

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