training a severly aggressive horse
 
 

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training a severly aggressive horse

This is a discussion on training a severly aggressive horse within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Parelli horse training the aggressive horse
  • Aggressive horse behavior and parelli

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    05-22-2013, 09:22 PM
  #1
Foal
training a severly aggressive horse

My mare is about 5 and I have only had her for a few months and I believe the people that sold her to me had her under something when I got her because she did not act like she is now. A few days after I got her home she started to act different. She took off on me on rides and Crow hopped and has started bucking and rearing. She is as bad on the ground as when I am in the saddle she cones up and throws her head and bites and has reared up inches in front of me way to many times. I have tried parelli training and everything I have found and she is getting worse. What do I try now?
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    05-22-2013, 09:23 PM
  #2
Teen Forum Moderator
Sell her as-is or go find a trainer...for both of you. Not a parelli trainer either. A dangerous horse is not something to be taken lightly or passively.
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    05-22-2013, 09:25 PM
  #3
Yearling
A trainer.

That's going to be the general consensus. I'm sure you'll have a few people telling you to put it down, too. But this horse is obviously too much for you, so if you're insistent on training him - Get help. Yesterday.
     
    05-22-2013, 10:09 PM
  #4
Weanling
You've had her about 2 months too long.

Either, put her down, send her to a trainer, or sell her with full disclosure.

In the future, have someone evaluate a prospective horse, that knows horses, before you get interested.
     
    05-22-2013, 10:14 PM
  #5
Trained
I'm surprised no one has suggested getting this horse checked out for pain issues. Teeth, chiro, farrier, vet, saddle fit.

After you are 100% certain that she isn't in pain (which means getting her checked out by professionals), either get a trainer (NOT a Parelli trainer) or get rid of her if you don't think you can handle her.
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    05-22-2013, 10:38 PM
  #6
Yearling
1. Vet. See if there's something wrong with her back, teeth etc and have her blood checked.

2. Trainer. Ditch the Parelli BS and find a real trainer to help you.
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    05-22-2013, 10:54 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I agree check do pain and find a trainer because even if it is a pain thing she may keep the behavior out of habit and being able to get away with it.
     
    05-22-2013, 11:01 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Also, I would ask the previous owners what type of feed they were giving her and what supplements. You want to know how much her diet has changed as this can be a big factor in behavior, especially if she has an imbalance. Change in diet as well as pain from something can definitely cause these issues. A deficiency in certain vitamins and/or minerals is an easy fix, but if it's not fixed the horse can behave worse and worse over time.

I know my horse, who is normally a sweet and gentle big puppy dog will act the way you described if I take him off of his magnesium supplements. Even on them he tests borderline low for magnesium levels.

I think you should do some investigating, starting with what his previous owners were feeding him and go from there. You may need to have a vet do a blood panel to make sure, which I know kind of sucks but in the end, if it is a diet or pain issue, a trainer can not fix it. When you have checked everything out and you know that the horse is medically fine, then I would invest in a trainer, and a good one. And yes, it takes some investigation to find a good trainer too.
     
    05-22-2013, 11:57 PM
  #9
Green Broke
I agree. Get a trainer that is not a Parelli follower. When working with the trainer discuss feed, turn out, work load and anything else the trainer can come up with.

Either that, or sell "as is" and get someone who knows you and horses (really knows horses!) to help you find that super horse that will suit you for years.
     
    05-23-2013, 12:06 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Ditch the Parelli bs. All the "games" and "joining up" is going to do nothing but lead to you being seriously injured by this dangerously disrespectful animal.

Sell her or find an experienced non parelli trainer.

No animal is worth your health and safety.
     

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