A training statement.
 
 

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A training statement.

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    04-22-2010, 04:09 PM
  #1
Foal
A training statement.

As some of you know, I have a good amount of horse training experience. Some of the threads/posts here are comprised of fair questions and good advice. Some are full of frusterating nonsense, imo, at least.

On Horse Training (an unhandled animal):
Rule 1: Don't get mad. Anger is what people resort to when they can't see other solutions. PLEASE, be smarter than a horse! If you are not smarter than a horse you shouldn't own one.

Rule 2: Become your horses loving yet stern parent. Become its friend but at the same time estblish rules for behavior and stick to the rules you made consistently. Methods and goals may change but the concept is always the same.

Rule 3: There is no rule 3. If you follow the first two rules ALL of the time in every thing you do, you will be fine.
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    04-22-2010, 04:22 PM
  #2
Foal
Maybe there is a rule 3? Teach, don't punish. Meaning, catch unwanted behavior early and correct it then. Don't wait until it's over and then smack.(Easier said than done, but still an important concept.)

I like your rules 1 and 2.
     
    04-22-2010, 04:34 PM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rule of Reason    
Maybe there is a rule 3? Teach, don't punish. Meaning, catch unwanted behavior early and correct it then. Don't wait until it's over and then smack.(Easier said than done, but still an important concept.)

I like your rules 1 and 2.
See we already disagree with rule 3. I agree with the first 2.
If a horse kicks you out of the blue I punish. If the horse tries to bit me I punish. He kicks me I knee him hard in the ribs. He bits me he runs into the corner of my brush or my elbow. I give him the opportunity to misbehave and he runs into punishment.
He quickly learns that bad behavor mets with discipline.
     
    04-22-2010, 05:43 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I agree with all 3 rules.
Heres another one that I always follow: be fair to the horse, they know when they deserve a "kick" and when they don't. And I like to give plenty of praise, haha but that's just me :P
     
    04-22-2010, 05:52 PM
  #5
Foal
...maybe I did leave out a third rule...Don't anthropomorphise your horse... :-/
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    04-22-2010, 06:22 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
...maybe I did leave out a third rule...Don't anthropomorphise your horse... :-/
Most important rule!
     
    04-22-2010, 07:35 PM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaioti    
...maybe I did leave out a third rule...Don't anthropomorphise your horse... :-/
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That went right over my head?????????
     
    04-22-2010, 07:40 PM
  #8
Trained
I agree with both ROR and RD, really, because in a way, there are times when you can teach/correct (before the incident happens) and times you must 'punish' a behavior (when something does happen)...you're darn straight if a horse bites me I'm going to get in his face and make him know that this behavior is UNacceptable!!! The big difference between him and me, is that I can't bite him hard enough to break anything...he could break my neck if he decided to, with one well aimed bite attack, so you're darn straight I'm going to 'punish' that behavior.

Now if you see a certain behavior coming on, and don't do anything to prevent it (say a horse keeps raising a leg and 'mimics' to kick at you) and you do nothing to correct that, like getting him to yield his body, and desensitizing his body to your touch again, then you're not being responsible in you're training...punishment shouldn't have to be 'necessary' if you're listening and watching your horse's body language...you can usually see things coming before they escalate to 'all out acts' such as biting, kicking, lunging, or other acts of disrespect...PAY attention to your horse and correct things as they happen, don't wait for them to escalate into things that require harsher discipline. However, if you need to discipline in a stronger fashion, DO so, because a horse is 1000 lbs of fight or flight, and he NEEDS to respect his handler.
     
    04-22-2010, 07:47 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
That went right over my head?????????
same here?
     
    04-22-2010, 07:54 PM
  #10
Trained
Anthropomorphising means to give human emotions/thoughts to your horse.

I agree with the first two rules and I think that they include all of the other rules mentioned. Rule 3 (from Kiaoti) is a great one as well and probably makes the other two easier to follow.
     

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