Training a young horse
 
 

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Training a young horse

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        04-07-2013, 09:34 AM
      #1
    Started
    Training a young horse

    Hi everyone I haven't been on here in a long time and decided it was time to return haha

    So I have a three year old filly who I have started and riding a couple of times now. She has been long reined and had her first experience of being out on the road yesterday. She's very willing to learn new things and is very willing to please.

    I just think I'm at a creative dead end with what to do with her. I don't want to do too much riding with her at this early stage and just want her to know the basics at this point. My concern is that she will get bored with the lunge work and the long reining and I don't want to sour her on anything.

    So what I'm really asking is for any ideas with things to do with young horses.

    Here's a video of her over the past week or so so that you can see what stages of training she's at or if you guys think I'm doing anything wrong and could use any help.


    I have started horses before I just want to see what different opinions and perspectives I can get on her training.
         
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        04-07-2013, 03:40 PM
      #2
    Foal
    She looks like she's had an awesome start, and you're on your way to a good future with her! She pays attention and responds to you very well, and the trust has definitely been established. The only thing I'm going to nit-pick is when you put on the bridle or a halter, always come from the front, not underneath the head. Coming from underneath is a bad habit (I used to do it all the time, had to train myself out of it) and encourages the horse to raise her head and step backward. Instead, when you put the bridle on, hold the top part of the bridle in your right hand with the bit in your left, and lasso her face with the bridle first before putting the bit in her mouth. If she raises her head or tries to get away when you do it, well then ya got something new to work on =D
    boots likes this.
         
        04-07-2013, 04:54 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Laffeetaffee    
    She looks like she's had an awesome start, and you're on your way to a good future with her! She pays attention and responds to you very well, and the trust has definitely been established. The only thing I'm going to nit-pick is when you put on the bridle or a halter, always come from the front, not underneath the head. Coming from underneath is a bad habit (I used to do it all the time, had to train myself out of it) and encourages the horse to raise her head and step backward. Instead, when you put the bridle on, hold the top part of the bridle in your right hand with the bit in your left, and lasso her face with the bridle first before putting the bit in her mouth. If she raises her head or tries to get away when you do it, well then ya got something new to work on =D

    What are you talking about in coming from the front when bridling?

    And lassoing the face with bridle?
         
        04-07-2013, 04:59 PM
      #4
    Trained
    I was wondering the same thing. I have always (and will continue to) done it from the side. My horses are taught prior to even bridling that when I put a hand between their ears, their head comes down. This is taught easily, and helps a lot. ALWAYS stand at the side. If you are in front and a horse flips its head they will hit you in the face.
    Palomine and GotaDunQH like this.
         
        04-07-2013, 05:07 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Exposure is what gets a broke horse broke.

    I can't exactly say what you should be doing from just a little video and all I can give you is some things that you may want to look out for.

    When your horse bucked, reared, etc. it looked like you just stopped when he did such a thing. In the beginning when he bucked you seemed like you were cantering, then he bucked, then you slowed down instead of kept pushing him forward. In his mind he gets a break when he bucks, then it becomes a nasty and a dangerous habit. Same goes with the rearing, you have to keep pushing him no matter how much he rears/bucks until he does the right thing. Even in the slightest try.

    Do you have more videos? I really like her, haha.
         
        04-07-2013, 05:08 PM
      #6
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Laffeetaffee    
    She looks like she's had an awesome start, and you're on your way to a good future with her! She pays attention and responds to you very well, and the trust has definitely been established. The only thing I'm going to nit-pick is when you put on the bridle or a halter, always come from the front, not underneath the head. Coming from underneath is a bad habit (I used to do it all the time, had to train myself out of it) and encourages the horse to raise her head and step backward. Instead, when you put the bridle on, hold the top part of the bridle in your right hand with the bit in your left, and lasso her face with the bridle first before putting the bit in her mouth. If she raises her head or tries to get away when you do it, well then ya got something new to work on =D
    I wouldn't really say I'm coming from under her I'm at the side as I've been taught and will probably always do as if I was coming from the front it would give her a chance to hit me if she threw her head up would she not?
    Palomine likes this.
         
        04-07-2013, 05:12 PM
      #7
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheAQHAGirl    
    Exposure is what gets a broke horse broke.

    I can't exactly say what you should be doing from just a little video and all I can give you is some things that you may want to look out for.

    When your horse bucked, reared, etc. it looked like you just stopped when he did such a thing. In the beginning when he bucked you seemed like you were cantering, then he bucked, then you slowed down instead of kept pushing him forward. In his mind he gets a break when he bucks, then it becomes a nasty and a dangerous habit. Same goes with the rearing, you have to keep pushing him no matter how much he rears/bucks until he does the right thing. Even in the slightest try.

    Do you have more videos? I really like her, haha.
    Thank you very much when she first bucked from the canter she had gone into canter herself and I was about to bring her back to trot anyway she just caught me at a bad time and the time she stopped I realised I should have pushed on and thank you for pointing it out again it's a reminder I need constantly.

    I do have more videos on my channel of her and other horses and should be putting more up of her consistently if I can get someone to video for me yes. I'm glad someone likes her other than me haha :)
         
        04-07-2013, 05:25 PM
      #8
    Green Broke
    You are bridling right if coming from side and under, you never approach horse from front to do anything as the horse will back up or fling head.

    As I grew up with Saddlebreds, and being taught by my father, I do bridle somewhat differently than many, as I come under throatlatch with right arm and bring hand down between ears to grasp bridle/cavesson, and pull those up as I bit horse.

    Also will curl arm around and under to grasp headstall at broadest part of forehead and bring up.

    But with high headed horses, you will either teach them to lower head as FnB said, by pressure on poll, or my method of arm under, and over. Same thing though as is on poll to lower head.
         
        04-08-2013, 08:27 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    I made a mistake by being under miover he pushed forward and pinned me against the fence.

    Safer to be on the side,

    I hold the bridle in my right hand, and I put my thumb on the bit ring, and stick my thumb in the side of his mouth where the bit would go which makes him open his mouth, and I slip the bit in from there

    Miover also raises head and yanks back, he is a mission to get bridle on, I also learnt from a person who works with race horses that try not to have ur arm going going over there face on opersite side, and to try and raising from mouth up.

    But yeah I learnt a lesson standing directly in front of him being under his chin,as went forward while pinning me to the fence,

    Should always be on the side of them
    Palomine likes this.
         
        04-08-2013, 08:44 PM
      #10
    Showing
    For what it's worth, Shauna, I bridle the same way - you can control the nose by keeping your hand on their nose with the bridle gathered around the middle. I much prefer that way than holding above the poll.
    Foxhunter likes this.
         

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