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Training a young horse

This is a discussion on Training a young horse within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        04-08-2013, 09:06 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    For what it's worth, Shauna, I bridle the same way - you can control the nose by keeping your hand on their nose with the bridle gathered around the middle. I much prefer that way than holding above the poll.
    Agreed. I, too, go under. I have an old injury (right dislocated shoulder) that doesn't allow me to come from the top, scares me to pieces to do it that way. If I were reaching over and for whatever reason the horse popped it's head up, my shoulder would "pop" as well- no thanks. A horse that wants to evade the bridle will find a way :) Nothing can really "trick" them for long. Good training is the best preventative.

    OP- looks like you're doing a great job!
         
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        04-08-2013, 09:15 PM
      #12
    Started
    Agreeing with all you guys on the bridling thing. I've bridled this way since I was about five I think and well it's always worked and I've never been told I've been doing anything wrong and coming from the front just seems a bit stupid when thinking of possible injuries.
    Palomine likes this.
         
        04-09-2013, 04:08 PM
      #13
    Started
    So off the topic of bridling. In regards to things to do with her, I've been doing quite a bit of long reining with poles walking in and out of cones and walking/trotting through mazes of poles and stuff just to get her doing things to get her even more used to steering and such :) Going well so far.
         
        04-10-2013, 01:16 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Ive never been able to bridle while having arm on poll, he raises his head and I am up in the air LOL

    Asoon as the bit touches miovers mouth he raises his head and pulls back, he's already broken 4 head halters thru pulling back,

    I've stood there for 2 hrs trying to bridle him, cos I wasnt going to let him win with getting away with pulling back. I eventually got it after 2 hrs I let him stand there for 20 mins with bridle on, and then I took it off him,

    Im doing more groundwork with him atm and not worrying with riding, as I don't yet have a saddle that fits him, couple of weeks I get my new saddle and then I need to get a saddle fitter, so will work on keeping head down while doing ground work, and slowley re introduce the bit thru just, rubbing his poll and having bit touch his lips in a relaxed manner, do that for couple of weeks until he can keep his head down and can have bit touch his mouth w/o pulling back
         
        04-10-2013, 01:42 AM
      #15
    Showing
    She looks like a really nice young horse. I agree with AQHAgirl that the very best thing for a young horse is lots of miles and experience. I'd be spending no less than an hour on her at least 4-5 days a week riding as many trails as you can at w/t/c.

    One thing I might suggest, though. Drop all the pressure off the bit unless you're asking her to stop. She's much too green for you to be asking her for any type of contact at all. Starting her on that before she figures out how to move forward can cause resistance, all kinds of headset issues (dropping the head, stargazing, nosing out, etc) and, as you've found out, rearing/bucking in refusal of moving forward.

    Whenever she goes to bucking/kicking out, take her nose to one side and push her into very fast, small circles until she relaxes and is very supple. That will discourage her from bucking because she'll begin to understand that bucking = work.

    As for the rearing, dropping the pressure off the bit should help, but whenever she balks and you feel her front end getting light, I'd be whipping her butt hard with the whip. When she moves forward willingly (even if it's fast, which it may be...you'll need to be ready for a near bolt), just let her go and only give her directions by using one rein. Do not pick up both reins to slow her down or stop her, that will only confuse and frustrate her and probably make her worse. Until she's moving forward willingly 100% of the time in a controlled environment where you can safely circle her around to slow her down after getting after her with the whip, I wouldn't take her out on the road.

    As for how you bridled her, that's not the way I do it, but I see nothing wrong with your method.

    Does she paw at you often like she did at 2:13? If that's happened more than just that once, I'd be correcting that quick, fast, and in a hurry.
         
        04-10-2013, 11:25 AM
      #16
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    She looks like a really nice young horse. I agree with AQHAgirl that the very best thing for a young horse is lots of miles and experience. I'd be spending no less than an hour on her at least 4-5 days a week riding as many trails as you can at w/t/c.

    One thing I might suggest, though. Drop all the pressure off the bit unless you're asking her to stop. She's much too green for you to be asking her for any type of contact at all. Starting her on that before she figures out how to move forward can cause resistance, all kinds of headset issues (dropping the head, stargazing, nosing out, etc) and, as you've found out, rearing/bucking in refusal of moving forward.

    Whenever she goes to bucking/kicking out, take her nose to one side and push her into very fast, small circles until she relaxes and is very supple. That will discourage her from bucking because she'll begin to understand that bucking = work.

    As for the rearing, dropping the pressure off the bit should help, but whenever she balks and you feel her front end getting light, I'd be whipping her butt hard with the whip. When she moves forward willingly (even if it's fast, which it may be...you'll need to be ready for a near bolt), just let her go and only give her directions by using one rein. Do not pick up both reins to slow her down or stop her, that will only confuse and frustrate her and probably make her worse. Until she's moving forward willingly 100% of the time in a controlled environment where you can safely circle her around to slow her down after getting after her with the whip, I wouldn't take her out on the road.

    As for how you bridled her, that's not the way I do it, but I see nothing wrong with your method.

    Does she paw at you often like she did at 2:13? If that's happened more than just that once, I'd be correcting that quick, fast, and in a hurry.
    Thank you very much for the advice on the contact and the bucking I'll work on that when I have her out next :)

    No it's not a common thing that she does.
         

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