Training young horse to circle
   

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Training young horse to circle

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  • Teaching young horse to circle

 
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    03-24-2011, 07:43 AM
  #1
Foal
Training young horse to circle

Hi Friends! I've got a question about my Perch/Arab cross filly who will be three in April. I brought her home to my farm in January. Prior to my ownership she has had no training other than being tied on a 10-foot lead for most of her short life. I have worked with her on leading and backing and moving from side to side for me and she is doing all of this willingly and well but I can't seem to get her to circle as she just stops and faces me. She is a very quiet and easy mare with absolutely no aggressive actions at all which I suppose stems from her Percheron side. I hate to pop her with the lung whip to get her to move but it looks like that is what I will have to do. I am just hoping that someone could give me advice on using another technique? Thanks in advance!
     
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    03-24-2011, 10:57 AM
  #2
mls
Trained
What do you mean by wanting her to circle you? Lunge?
     
    03-24-2011, 12:17 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
What do you mean by wanting her to circle you? Lunge?
I'm sorry, yes, I mean to lunge her. I have access to a round pen but when I take her there she steps off and then stops and looks at me. I'm thinking that if I encourage her with the lungg whip she may circle but I would like to get her to move without popping her. Due to her prior experience tied to a quad tracker by a 10-foot lead she is extremely desensitized to any noises or usual stimuli. She does move for me from side to side and back up when I cluck to her but she doesn't seem to get this when we're in the round pen.
     
    03-24-2011, 02:25 PM
  #4
Foal
I had the same problem with my friends horse. Except he is the opposite, very sensitive to the whip (but only sometimes)
Before I got a set up for side reins I would stand on the side but behind him and encourage him forward so he was stepping away from me but still direct him in a circle. Eventually he understood that I was asking him to circle. Sometimes he would still turn to me when he felt he was done with circles. Hahahaha.

Hope this helps a bit.
     
    03-24-2011, 03:07 PM
  #5
Green Broke
There have been many other threads about this same thing. When it all boils down, if she doesn't move when you ask her, you need to keep upping the pressure until she does. This may end up that you have to "pop" her at first. When she does move off, release all pressure. She will learn that it is better to move off when you first ask her or things get uncomfortable.
     
    03-24-2011, 05:11 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
There have been many other threads about this same thing. When it all boils down, if she doesn't move when you ask her, you need to keep upping the pressure until she does. This may end up that you have to "pop" her at first. When she does move off, release all pressure. She will learn that it is better to move off when you first ask her or things get uncomfortable.

Yeah, it might be that you have to up the pressure enough to get a response, but your objective will be to resesitize her to pressure, not DEsensitze her. This is one reason that I sometimes have negative feelings to some of the Parelli type excersizes that tend to overly desensitize a horse.

She is looking at you in the round pen because she doesnt' know what you want her to do. Next time you go in the round pen, you decide what you want her to do and keep that up front in your head. If you keep focussed on the goal, don't let her lack of focus sway you, she will see that there is a reason for you putting pressure on. Horses are SO much more comfortable if they know that you have a purpose in mind and once they understand that purpose, they usuall aren't resentful about it, even it means that you popped her once or twice. Things will be clearer for her and it sets things in a feeling of stability; she follows your direction and all is well in the world , instead of her wondering "why are we in here?".

I did a little video on how to get your horse to step out away from you, as a prelude to lunging on a line. It is really a homemade video and doesn't show the next step once they do step out; make them circle. But it might be something fun for you two to play around with.

There are some really good trainers out there who will show this techinque in a professional manner, instead of me fumbling around. But watch it for yuks and giggles.

Look into Chris Irwin on Stateline tack website and Jonathon field has some videos on Youtube about lunging.
How to get your horse away from you so you can begin lunging him around a circle
     
    03-24-2011, 06:25 PM
  #7
Foal
[QUOTE=tinyliny;973898]Yeah, it might be that you have to up the pressure enough to get a response, but your objective will be to resesitize her to pressure, not DEsensitze her. This is one reason that I sometimes have negative feelings to some of the Parelli type excersizes that tend to overly desensitize a horse.

She is looking at you in the round pen because she doesnt' know what you want her to do. Next time you go in the round pen, you decide what you want her to do and keep that up front in your head. If you keep focussed on the goal, don't let her lack of focus sway you, she will see that there is a reason for you putting pressure on. Horses are SO much more comfortable if they know that you have a purpose in mind and once they understand that purpose, they usuall aren't resentful about it, even it means that you popped her once or twice. Things will be clearer for her and it sets things in a feeling of stability; she follows your direction and all is well in the world , instead of her wondering "why are we in here?".

I did a little video on how to get your horse to step out away from you, as a prelude to lunging on a line. It is really a homemade video and doesn't show the next step once they do step out; make them circle. But it might be something fun for you two to play around with.


Thanks so much for the good advice Usnpets and Tinyliny. I know that I will most likely end up having to give her a good reason to really move out for me. I will keep this foremost in my mind while working with her. The video Tinyliny is very helpful too! Thanks for that. I hope to get my mare down to the roundpen this coming weekend and will update you on how she did/does. I agree about the thoughts on overly DEsensitizing. I wish she had not been so exposed to these things as she is now only almot three and virtually unflapable to all sounds, movement, large engines and machinery of every kind I have found thus far. There is certainly a plus side to desensitization but unfortunatley the downside borders on dullness.
     
    03-25-2011, 08:00 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
... This is one reason that I sometimes have negative feelings to some of the Parelli type excersizes that tend to overly desensitize a horse...
There has to be a balance of sensitizing and desensitizing. If you overdo desensitizing, you'll get a dull and unresponsive horse. If you don't do enough, you'll get a spooky and reactive horse. I'm not a big fan of Parelli either. I follow more of Clinton Anderson's method.
     
    03-26-2011, 04:35 AM
  #9
Foal
Hi I had the same problem. My filly had been taught to face up whenever put under any sort of pressure. I tried tapping her with the whip but nothing worked. One day I went into the round yard and just said right I am going to lunge her today! Decided to try free lunging before adding the rope. So left her in her halter and tried to send her away. Once again she faced up so I backed her out of my space (doing whatever necessary...waving my arms, stomping just seeming as aggressive as necessary) then when she was standing away from me I put the pressure on her until she was walking around the round yard, every time she tried to face up I sent her away until she started walking around and then I stopped all the pressure. Did this over and over until she finally understood what I wanted. Today was the 3rd time I have lunged her and she can now be lunged on lead and I only have to point in the direction I want her to go and apply a bit of pressure on the opposite side and she will calmly move off, leaving the lead slack :) Best of luck!
     
    03-26-2011, 07:28 AM
  #10
Foal
Thanks so much Hearts11! I will try this!
     

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