Treating a burst heel bulb abscess?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Treating a burst heel bulb abscess?

This is a discussion on Treating a burst heel bulb abscess? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horses heel looks bad and is sore
  • Treatment for burst heels

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-20-2010, 06:02 PM
  #1
Foal
Smile Treating a burst heel bulb abscess?

My four y/o was lame on Monday. The very next day, an abscess burst out of his inside heel bulb, on his right front.
Since it burst so quickly, I'm assuming it's pretty superficial.

Anyways, what should I be doing to treat it? I've been soaking in epsom salts, and bandaging it with a poultice pad. The last two days my trainer suggested using hydrogen peroxide, because it wasn't healing as quickly as he'd hoped.
He doesn't think I should be soaking it every day, because the extra moisture looks like it's causing some cracking.

My farrier is impossible to get ahold of, but I've been calling him all weekend to get him to come out.

All the treatments I find on the internet are how to draw out a suspected abscess, but I can't find much on what to do once it's burst.

He's turned out, and I've been doing some light lunging the last couple of days because he gets kind of hard to handle if left alone.
He's looks almost completely sound on it.

Any advice is great, this is my first abscess. How long should it take to heal? What should I be watching for? What else should I be doing, if I'm not soaking it every day now?

Thanks so much!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-20-2010, 06:43 PM
  #2
Banned
Once the abscess has burst, that's pretty much it--the infection has drained, and all that's left is the actual hole it came out of. Just make sure the hole stays clean and dry. No need to bandage or soak. If he's not lame on it, he can work.
     
    06-20-2010, 06:58 PM
  #3
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by justsambam08    
Once the abscess has burst, that's pretty much it--the infection has drained, and all that's left is the actual hole it came out of. Just make sure the hole stays clean and dry. No need to bandage or soak. If he's not lame on it, he can work.
Agreed. Stop soaking it, keep it as dry and clean as you can, and just let it heal on it's own. Usually the more you mess with it, the longer it takes.
     
    06-20-2010, 11:15 PM
  #4
Foal
It was looking pretty grim today, giving off heat and it had a bit of a smell. My vet's coming out tomorrow, hopefully.

Any thoughts on this though...
As you can see in the picture, there's a hole that's clean, and then above it there's this red spot that smells off and is really red... I'm not sure if it's a secondary abscess, or part of the original or what.

The hole doesn't show that well, but it's the dark area under the red spot. The hole itself is clean and not giving off any fluids.
The red spot looked way worse today than yesterday.

I'm kind of semi-concerned, I just re-bandaged it today after cleaning it off. He does seem to be completely sound on the foot though, and he isn't showing any signs of being affected by it.

     
    06-21-2010, 12:24 AM
  #5
Banned
This could be a sore possibly....since the pic is not of the best quality, I'm assuming its on the outside of the foot, not the part of the bulb that would potentially come into contact with the ground....It almost looks to be at the coronary band.

I would just wait to see what the vet says, but I would not soak it, since epsom salts probably would not feel too good on that. Keep it clean and apply an antibiotic and you can't go wrong with that, as far as basic wound care.
     
    06-21-2010, 12:31 AM
  #6
Foal
I do think it's located around the coronary band, you're right. I can't see how a sore would develop there, because he's been bandaged the whole week. I don't think the bandages could cause something that bad?

You think something like Polysporin would be alright then? I'm not completely sure they can come out tomorrow, and I'm at a bit of a loss as far as wound care goes. I'm thinking of asking for some oral antibiotics.
     
    06-21-2010, 12:38 AM
  #7
Yearling
Do you have animalintex pads? I would dampen one and place it on there firmly wrapped with vetwrap. Change it every 12 hours or so, but I'd also avoid the soaking at this point. There is a point where soaking becomes counterproductive. The poultice pad will keep it moist enough. I've seen horses with majoy blow-outs have bad fevers, so keep an eye on his temp. Keep trying your farrier, as they are often more usefull in treating these things than a vet although I do think it wise to consult a vet at this point as well.
Good luck - abscessed feet suck!
     
    06-21-2010, 12:48 AM
  #8
Yearling
[QUOTE=justsambam08;666512]This could be a sore possibly....since the pic is not of the best quality, I'm assuming its on the outside of the foot, not the part of the bulb that would potentially come into contact with the ground....It almost looks to be at the coronary band.

It looks like the inside of the foot to me, and it's a pretty classic place for an abscess of gravel to errupt. The infection will take the path of least resistence and that is often throught the coronet band. Sometimes they will errupt from the coronet band as well as through the sole or frog.
If you are using a poultice pad, I wouldn't put anything on there like an ointment. Just use the poultice pad and maybe scrub once a day with castiles or similar mild product to keep it clean. Pay close attention to the discharge on the pad.
     
    06-21-2010, 02:17 AM
  #9
Yearling
Honestly, I would leave it alone. That looks like a mild scrape/sore, and wrapping it will just keep it and the abcess moist when it should be kept dry. Chopper blew an abcess out of his heel after being dead lame for almost a week. As soon as it blew I cleaned it up, left it alone and put him back to work.
     
    06-21-2010, 07:50 AM
  #10
Yearling
^^if there is a foul odour and heat as she mentioned, perhaps continued poulticing would be a good idea until the discharge stops on the poultice pad. Otherwise if it dries up and there is remaining infection in the pocket it can fester more and become a bigger problem.
     

Tags
abscess, heel, poultice, treatment

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Treating thrush newhorsemom Horse Health 3 01-17-2010 03:21 PM
How many Horses does it take to change a light bulb G and K's Mom Jokes and Funnies 15 12-19-2009 10:36 PM
Treating thrush in Hooves Stencilbum Horse Health 3 10-29-2009 02:00 PM
How many horses does it take to change a light bulb? crackrider Jokes and Funnies 14 10-17-2007 01:54 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0