Trouble lunging to the right??
 
 

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Trouble lunging to the right??

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  • I cant lunge horse to the right
  • My horse is having trouble lunging

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  • 1 Post By crazyfilly
  • 1 Post By mls

 
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    05-22-2012, 03:50 PM
  #1
Foal
Trouble lunging to the right??

I just rescued an OTTB about a month ago. She's been great, except when I go to lunge her to the right she freaks out. She'll do absolutely anything to keep you from going to her right side. It is weird though, because she doesn't mind on liberty. As long as I am holding a rope, she wears herself out before she will move forward.

Just to answer any questions I can think of:

When I ask, I try to get on her right side so that she can't avoid me. If I rub her and go under her neck, I can reach her right side but she will throw her head up in the air and backs up.

I am not trying to get anything but forward motion. I don't care if it is a walk, trot, canter, gallop, something other than complete avoidance.

I understand that she was mostly handled from the left side and that I need to be patient, but I have been doing groundwork on the right for a month and she isn't getting any better.

She is also what I call "ADD". She loses interest in the drop of a hat and it is extremely difficult to keep her on track and focused on me.

I am up for any ideas at this point.
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    05-22-2012, 04:01 PM
  #2
Foal
My OTTB is EXACTLY the same! Lunging to the left is fine, but trying to make him go to the right is a nightmare!

I got him to go to the right 2 days ago after a lot of patience and work. He was tossing his head and kept facing me for about a whole rotation of the circle, but after a while he started to behave.

But I can defiantly agree, my boy is difficult on one side, but an angel for everything else :/
     
    05-22-2012, 04:03 PM
  #3
Foal
Well at least I am not alone :)
     
    05-22-2012, 04:21 PM
  #4
Foal
I find it very very annoying :/
     
    05-22-2012, 04:23 PM
  #5
mls
Trained
Many horses are very right or left side oriented. You'll want to start by simply leading and handling more from the right hand side. Then start with a lead rope and buggy whip. Stand facing her mid shoulder/rib cage and 'send' her forward with a tap on the hip. Gradually increase the space between you and her being careful to not step forward of her shoulder.

It will help if you can teach her the verbal "walk on" or "step" so she can correlate the tap with the voice command.
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    05-22-2012, 05:59 PM
  #6
Foal
Not allowing you to get down her offside is an evasion. If a horse finds it difficult or uncomfortable to run a circle in a particular direction, they may use several forms of evasion to avoid it. If one of these avoidance tactics doesn't work, they will try something else, and this will result in the horse facing the handler and the handler not being able to get into a position to send the horse on.

Horses which have learned such serious evasions have to be taught to yield their head, neck, and shoulder, and forequarters, initially to a training stick and, later, to the handler stepping in toward those areas. Then the horse can be caused to yield its fore end away from the handler, and then sent on on a circle around the handler. Any potential for the horse to fall in and attempt evasion can be counteracted by the handler stepping in toward its shoulder and then sending it on again.
     
    05-22-2012, 08:01 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by AengusOg    
Not allowing you to get down her offside is an evasion. If a horse finds it difficult or uncomfortable to run a circle in a particular direction, they may use several forms of evasion to avoid it. If one of these avoidance tactics doesn't work, they will try something else, and this will result in the horse facing the handler and the handler not being able to get into a position to send the horse on.

Horses which have learned such serious evasions have to be taught to yield their head, neck, and shoulder, and forequarters, initially to a training stick and, later, to the handler stepping in toward those areas. Then the horse can be caused to yield its fore end away from the handler, and then sent on on a circle around the handler. Any potential for the horse to fall in and attempt evasion can be counteracted by the handler stepping in toward its shoulder and then sending it on again.

The above it correct. You have to learn how to first send her head and shoulders away from you, so that she is no longer facing you square on . ONce she does this, you progress to having her move forward.


When you went under her neck and tried to put your hand on her right side neck, and she "went backwards", this is when I would go with her. I would just keep "asking " to be on her right side, and not allow her to back away from my request. So, you move with her but stay awar of the milisecond when she stops backing, at which point you ease off a tad. You should be on her right side, walking with her, this whole time. So, her backing away does not remove you from her side, but her ceasing to back away will earn some relief.

IN general, when asking her to turn her head and shoulders away from you you, don't let her attempt to avoid you by backing make you stop asking. You can hold the rope and give a few yanks on it to indicate to her to go forward. A steady pull is better, but if she is backing , you can break her out of that with a few yanks, then a steady rope contact to say "dont' go backward" and a pressure on her head and shoulders (with whip)to make her step away from directly facing you to the place where her right side is toward you. Reward that and ease off .

Eventually, you get that step out and then you ask with the rope and pressure more on her hip (with the lunge whip or long dressage whip) to have her move forward.
     
    05-22-2012, 08:32 PM
  #8
Foal
My Quarter/Arab used to be the same way. Lol What I did was I would 'bump' on her with the lead rope in the way I wanted her to go. Then with the whip in my left hand, I would tap her on the neck. It was difficult, but she finally go it. Going to the right still isn't her cup of tea, but we're getting there. Lol
     

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avoid, lunging, ottb

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