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Trying to Kick me!

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  • Horse kicks me in the round pen
  • Horse kicks out when being lunged in round pen

 
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    12-30-2008, 12:17 AM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyChester    
My Mare keeps on trying to kick me. I might be working her in the round yard and she will turn to kick me. I would be feeding her and she would try and kick, even when Im out catching her she will try and kick me.

She has missed all of the times she has tried but Im so scared that one day she wont. I have owned her for around 1 month now and ever since I bought her she has been doing it.

She also kicks undersaddle, I would give her a nudge and she would kick out. I'm not experienced enough to make her stop, if there is anyway to stop it. What do you guys think I should do?
You have access to a round pen? Put a helmet on, a pair of gloves, a lunge whip and throw her in there. Start off slow and put her in a position where you know she is going to be challenging you and when she does, kick her butt into moving forward and by that I mean forwards. She can canter, gallop whatever MAKE HER WORK. When she decides she is done and stops and turns to face you, praise her and walk up to her. The second she even considers or actually turns her back on you, get her working HARD.

She'll learn quickly that being a witch isn't as much fun as she thought AND it's safe for you because yo are staying away from her when it happens. Cobalt went thru a 1 day phase of that once tho he never made threats to kick, he never learned he needed to always face me when I approached him.
Depending on how stubborn she is, it might take a few outings like that to get her to the point where she starts respecting you. It sounds to me like she's been pushing you around and you have allowed her to do so.
     
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    12-30-2008, 12:33 AM
  #12
Showing
Also want to add what happened with an old gelding I had. He was a reg. Tb and 16'3 weighing about 1,400lbs?? BIG guy. Whenever I would try to load him in the trailer, he would become a complete jerk and would try to run over me and push me over. I did the exact same thing as above. I knew for a fact he was fine with trailers so that wasn't the issue. It was all about respect.

I grabbed a lunge line and a while and did the exact same thing as posted above.

I would ask him ONCE to load and if he even started to think "no" then I would chase him and make him work SO HARD on the lunge line. It took me 30+ mins the first time before he understood that getting on the trailer when I asked him to was much more simple. By the end of it he was dead tired and realised I wasn't giving up. Never had problems after that. So good in fact I only needed to walk up to the ramp and he would finish loading by himself.

With these mind games, these smart horses it's not a question of over powering them or showing them who's boss but a matter of simply showing them that bad behavior means work. If they were smart enough to play games with you in the first place, they really very quickly learn that hard work isn't as much fun.
Another BIG key thing is to NEVER let something bad re-occur. Here are some examples with my own guy just over the last week alone.

When I lead him from the field to the barn, he's started to play and grab his own lead rope and he holds on to it all the way to the barn. He's only a baby and as much as I want to yell at him for doing that, I also know he's a baby and is probably going thru a baby punk phase so here is what I did....I went and got a stud chain. It's cold outside and just not fun to eat a freezing cold chain.Problem solved. No longer does that.

Today in the arena, he watched a 2 year old have a spaze attack and Cobalt ended up looking at the horse, no longer paying attention to me whatsoever. What did I do?....I halted him, back him up and halted him again. I waited 2-3 mins doing nothing making sure HE DID NOT MOVE a hair until I said he could. He did it and we went back to what we were doing.

Essentially I end up doing what it is they ddidn't want to do at least 2-3 times longer than how long it would have taken had it done it in the first place. If it's a horse that has to much energy and just doesn't care about your ground work, that's when the making them WORK HARD in the round pen kicks in. If they have the energy to be jerks, they will have the energy to work hard.
I'm done
     
    01-04-2009, 09:50 AM
  #13
Yearling
If you don't see any progress I would seriously consider getting a more easy going horse if you can't afford a trainer. Good luck
     
    01-04-2009, 04:26 PM
  #14
Foal
I think in all honesty it sounds like you don't have enough experience to own a horse like that and you should consider buying a different horse that requires less experience.
     
    01-05-2009, 12:57 AM
  #15
Yearling
When she went to kick in the round yard the other day she got a smack on the bum with the whip and hasnt tried doing it again. I still beleive I need a more quieter horse though but we will see how it goes.
     
    01-05-2009, 08:57 AM
  #16
Foal
Smile

My mare was like that when I got her,would kick and bite and try to run me over,kicked me in th butt and had a hoof print on my butt for weeks,lol
Lucky it wasnt my back.
I was being too soft on her and she was in control,so if she tries it now I will give her a smack(not hard)mostly for the noise and growl at her.
Now she is like my best mate,but im not soft on her as much and she can't get her way or we'll be back to square one.
     
    01-05-2009, 09:09 AM
  #17
Yearling
Crazychester, its okay to keep trying but you should think about trading her in for a more trained horse then later on go for a younger horse, just don't want you to get hurt or worse discouraged!:)
     
    01-05-2009, 06:23 PM
  #18
Yearling
Lovemyponies

I agree but my parents don't. My Mother is sick at the moment and intill we find out what is wrong with her I can't talk about horses which is why I have been making a little more threads then I usally do. Im more of a lurker so I get nervous posting threads :P
     
    01-13-2009, 01:46 AM
  #19
Foal
I agree with rascalboy and poptartshop in this one. You need to be the boss of her and let her know what this behavior is not going to fly. Right now she knows that she can pull this type of behavior with you. You are not a bad person if you give her a smack or kick to the gut for it. Like rascalboy said, I would rather let my horse know who is boss, then be rushed to hospital. Lunging her out will also help a lot. Whenever my mare is naughty, she is lunged out. She is a better horse because of it. The more assertive you are with her behavior now, the more she will learn that you are in charge. Remember, horses are herd animals and naturally respond to dominance.
     
    01-13-2009, 02:15 AM
  #20
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyChester    
I will try the crop thing, but if I do that wont she have trouble with whips in the future?

Whips are effective tools, when used correctly. If you just start beating on the horse with the whip non stop when she kicks, she will associate that as a bad experience. If she kicks out and you give her one quick smack, in time she will link that kicking=smack on butt. I am not saying this is the best solution, but it might work temporarily.

What she really needs is a bond set up with her. Spend time in a round pen if you have one, or use a lunge line. Use body language to move her around the ring. Change things up and spend lots of time bonding with her. When she does something wrong, make sure she knows it was wrong and do not let her get away with it. Spend time with her and make sure she knows your the boss, not her. Horses are herd animals and everything they have a relationship with is seen as a member of the herd, and each has their own place on the totem pole, right now it sounds like she thinks you're on the bottom.

When she kicks out, make her work like CacheDawnTaxes said. Whether it be a trot, canter, or gallop! Move her feet until she wants to stop and then try to go back towards her, if she kicks again start moving her! Like Cache said, in time she will think that kicking is not worth the effort anymore. It will take some time and a lot of patience, but stick with it and do not ever give up. Just make sure since she is trying to kick you to stay a safe distance from her and if you had to be within kicking distance for any reason, get as close to her body as possible, the kick hurts less this way because she can not get as much force into it close to her body. Good luck and be safe!
     

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