Turning a Horse Out w/Lead Rope - Page 3
 
 

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Turning a Horse Out w/Lead Rope

This is a discussion on Turning a Horse Out w/Lead Rope within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Why do they leave a lead rope on a stallion
  • Turning horse out groundwork

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    09-05-2011, 09:40 AM
  #21
Green Broke
Thanks for all the replies!!! I think this is something that I will be doing later today!!! Thanks again! Ill let everyone know how it goes :)
     
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    09-05-2011, 12:24 PM
  #22
Cat
Green Broke
I'll be the naysayer.

My mustang I had at the time got away from me (I was leading him and he bolted) and we were in the arena. He didn't want to be caught so I let him calm down before I tried again. He was dragging the lead rope, but before I even tried to work with him again something spooked him and he took off at a gallop around the arena. When he reached up with the longer stride of the gallop, the rope wrapped around his back leg and the momentum of the step snapped his head down and caused him to nose dive straight into the ground. Thankfully he didn't get hurt beyond a scrapped nose but it was horrible to watch and it had the potential to be worse.

I would never leave a lead rope on a loose horse on purpose. There are other ways to teach these lessons without the risk.
     
    09-05-2011, 01:43 PM
  #23
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
I'll be the naysayer.

My mustang I had at the time got away from me (I was leading him and he bolted) and we were in the arena. He didn't want to be caught so I let him calm down before I tried again. He was dragging the lead rope, but before I even tried to work with him again something spooked him and he took off at a gallop around the arena. When he reached up with the longer stride of the gallop, the rope wrapped around his back leg and the momentum of the step snapped his head down and caused him to nose dive straight into the ground. Thankfully he didn't get hurt beyond a scrapped nose but it was horrible to watch and it had the potential to be worse.

I would never leave a lead rope on a loose horse on purpose. There are other ways to teach these lessons without the risk.


Cat, this is why I was saying I had mixed feelings on the whole thing....there are just things that can go wrong....but at the same time, I feel as if, if I work with him on it, if something does happen, he wont freak out as bad. I don't necessarily say Im going to turn him out the moment I get to the barn, Im going to make sure he gives to the pressure, and use what someone else had said, about stepping on it a little bit, and having him give to that pressure.

I appreciate your opinion though! That sure sounds like a scary thing!!! Would have hated to see something like that. Glad it wasnt as bad as it could have been!!!
Wheatermay likes this.
     
    09-05-2011, 02:51 PM
  #24
Started
Yes, I agree that the way usandpets said to start is safest! You're right there with the horse, controlling what happens. Then, when horse understands to yield to rope under your foot, you can turn him into pen that's too small to canter/gallop in, for his sorting out his own stepping on the rope.

Thanks, Cat, for the excellent example of what can go wrong!
csimkunas6 and Wheatermay like this.
     
    09-05-2011, 07:35 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Went out and did this with Rodeo today....before I let him go, I stood on the rope a little bit, and he just kept his head low, and didnt pull up. I turned him out in the arena, only place that there is really. No round pen, that's the one bad thing about the new place:no round pen.

Anyways, I put a little pressure on him because all he wanted to do was eat the leaves off the ground the wind had blown down, so I kept him walking a bit. He would step on the rope, stop, and move to wear there was no more pressure on the rope. Majority of the time he did step on the rope with his hind legs.

One thing I did notice him do was when he would step on it with his front feet, he would start to walk, feel the pressure, stop, and then slowly pull the rope up from under his feet. He didnt panic at all, just made it to where there was no more pressure.

Thanks for everyone's help on this topic!!
Wheatermay likes this.
     
    09-07-2011, 06:03 PM
  #26
Foal
I do it with my gelding when he grazes. Sometimes I just stick a halter and lead rope on him and let him out in the yard. He's my little lawn mower. Hehe. It's so entertaining to watch him step on the lead rope and stand there with his head on the ground picking up each of his four feet until he finds the one standing on it. Lol
     
    09-08-2011, 02:06 AM
  #27
Yearling
Cat, if I hadnt taught my gelding that the lead rope isnt going to eat him he would havebeen running arounf like ur horse, notice the rope, THEN became even more terrified b/c of it. In the case he would ever get loose or even to teach him to ground tie, he must know that dragging rope isnt a snake.

Keep in mind, I could take this rope and swing it all over his body (making contact) and he will not flinch, but the moment it went on the ground he was scared of it. He even drops his head and gives to pressure really well.

Its an emergency plan, really. And you (not pointing you in particular out, lol... b/c I know he got away on accident) don't want them freaked out by not only...say the backfiring lawn mower bolt from me, then just as they are relaxing freak b/c of the rope. But you want to keep them in a small area, so they can't get I nto a canter. A trot isnt even very safe. A small pen is nice. It took several days of this before my guy didnt worry. Im still hesitant to drop his lead.

This year before I started him on it again, he was so scared of a blanket that he yanked the lead out of my hand (by rearing then turning on his heels (im letting go-he's a bucker...I didnt want my face to formally meet his hoof, lol...) He flipped again b/c the lead drug around... So that's when we started the loose horse with lead thing.

Let me also add that he ran through a fence b/c he was so scared of the lead, so its a safer option for him.
     
    09-10-2011, 09:48 AM
  #28
Cat
Green Broke
Hi Wheatermay - While I appreciate what you are saying, I still think there are other ways to teach a horse not to be scared of a lead rope - either in contact with them, on the ground, or even around their legs. In fact, Bandit wasn't scared of the actual rope at all when he was running due to the ground work I had already done with them. What spooked him was our neighbor's dog. New to the neighborhood and unfortunately had issues with any horses - in fact still does now years later.
     
    09-10-2011, 10:03 AM
  #29
Foal
I wouldn't not do it! Somewhere along the road you're going to drop a lead or rein and you don't want your horse to freak out. I start with a 10-12 foot line (not a flat nylon or leather) either round nylon or cotton and have the horse move round. See what happens so the horse can sort it out. Then, I use a 25 footer and they really learn that it's no big deal whether it gets around their legs or not and they also learn how to carry it off to the side as they travel and if you've taught your horse how to come to you, they will even learn how to adjust their feet to come when they've stepped on the rope that stops them and then come the rest of the way.
     
    09-10-2011, 10:13 AM
  #30
Foal
I do it all the time too. Every new horse that comes thru. Right now the 6 month old is learning it.
However, I will add- the horse should know how to give to pressure BEFORE you do it. Your going to have to do some ground work to begin with & make sure your horse is Okay with things around his legs too, which is always good to know period, because what if your out riding & a vine or anything gets wrapped around his leg? You wouldn't want him freaking out then would you?

I think with common sense & a little giving to pressure/groundwork/desensitizing ahead of time- it is an awesome thing to do. It teaches them how to use their head & figure things out which is invaluable while your on them at a later time.
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