TWH bit
 
 

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TWH bit

This is a discussion on TWH bit within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Bit for gentle walking horse
  • Gentle bits for walking horses

 
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    07-24-2010, 08:53 PM
  #1
Foal
TWH bit

Hey everybody, I have a 3yr old walking horse stallion that is greenbroke, started him out in a snaffle, upgraded to a wonder bit, now I would like tstart working on some collection and getting him to stay in gait better, I would like the least harsh bit as possible, I don't like the 8 inch shanks that is typical of walking horses. He is extremly easy to handle and very gentle, I would like to maybe show him at some local shows, and in this area people only like a horse to rack or a little smooth 4 bit gait at the local shows, I know the running walk is the natural gait of the walking horse, but around here they just wouldnt place a horse performing it. (crazy I know) I,m from a very small town. Any suggestion, by the way i'm new its nice to meet you all, my name is heather.
     
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    07-25-2010, 04:37 PM
  #2
Yearling
Well, I'd stick with the wonderbit. I have been using it on the mare my trainer has given me the chance to show. She is learning to really set her gait well.
     
    07-25-2010, 05:01 PM
  #3
Green Broke
You don't need to change the bit, you need to change the training. Getting a different bit will do nothing for control or gaiting, you need to train him to do it. 8+ inch shanks are typical in walkers because people purchase them without any knowledge of horse training because they are supposed to be easy to ride, then they try to pick up the front end for a "flashier" gait with a long shanked bit, they see horses that are stiff with upright necks and tucked chins and think that that is collection, it is not. You can do anything with a horse, gaited or not, in a simple gentle bit shanks or not, but you have to take the time and hard work to do it properly through training, not a bit.
     
    07-25-2010, 05:45 PM
  #4
Yearling
My advice? Just don't show. Why risk ruining your horse's gait because your local judges don't know what a running walk is?
     
    07-25-2010, 08:36 PM
  #5
Foal
Ok, thanks guys, that's what i'm asking is what bits are good and gentle I don't want to go with the traditional so called walking horse bits. But I would like to get a little bit of a chin tuck. And I do want to take the time to train him properly, i'm not into shortcuts either. I fairly new to gaited horses and want to do this the more natural way. If there is no way to show him without using some of the barbaric methods i've seen I just wont show.

And as for his gait, I would like to for him to be able to do both, the running walk which is what he was bred to do and the rack for the local shows. If I keep him slow he stays in his running walk if I speed him up he goes into the rack.
     
    07-25-2010, 08:38 PM
  #6
Yearling
Are you sure he doesn't pace when you get him faster? That's what the mare I ride will do.
     
    07-25-2010, 08:53 PM
  #7
Foal
No, he's in a very smooth 4 beat gait. No pace at all, when he breaks gait its always a horribly rough trot, but he's getting to where he almost never breaks
     
    07-26-2010, 12:50 AM
  #8
Trained
A bit will not teach a horse to collect...in fact you could teach this horse to collect and bend at the poll with the snaffle he was trained in originally. I hate when people think that its a bit that helps a horse learn how to collect...because that's simply not true.
     
    07-26-2010, 07:21 PM
  #9
Foal
Yes I agree, but I do think the bit has some influence on the way a horse carries himself, I don't believe in moving up in severity of the bit. But I have noticed a big difference since the Wonder bit.

Has anyone tried the Brenda Imus comfort bit?
     
    07-26-2010, 08:01 PM
  #10
Green Broke
A CHIN TUCK IS NOT COLLECTION!!! Most of the time it is in response to a harsh bit( sometimes called "jacking a horse up" where the chin is tucked and the neck and back are tense creating high vertical action in the fore limbs, most often done with a strong long shanked bit, but any improper handling can cause it). Maybe you should look up the definition od collecton and go from there.

A tucked chin can be very uncomfortable for a horse to achieve, depending on the degree of tuck( at or behinf the vertical) it can impede breathing, cause tendon and muscle strain, muscle spasm, back pain, impede sight, and make for a generally uncomfortable horse.

Maybe you should call in a professional trainer to achieve the gait and frame you desire, an good trainer can achieve both of these in any bit.
     

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