Tying a buddy sour horse to a post
 
 

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Tying a buddy sour horse to a post

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  • Free horse traing to seperate pasture buddies
  • Sour buddy horse threw me off

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    11-08-2013, 12:04 PM
  #1
Foal
Tying a buddy sour horse to a post

My horses are extremely buddy sour. It doesn't matter what horse I put in with my aunts horse she freaks out so much in the pasture it causes the other horses to do everything they can to get to her. I tied both of them together (there is only two) right next to each other for a few hours. I fed one and then came back later and fed the other. I have offered plenty of water and it is kind of chilly. Later I moved them farther apart. My plan is to take my horse who isn't buddy sour unless the other is screaming out of the pasture and turn the other loose when she carries on I will bring him back and immediately tie them both. I plan to continue this until she can enjoy being turned loose while he is out of sight. This shouldn't cause trauma as they are together when tied. Will this work. I am down to my last hope the other horse is not mine and she has done this to three horses. My horse threw me off trying to get to her. She just runs and screams. I have tried moving my horse farther and farther out but my horse is greenbroke and I can't control him when she is screaming. He is a doll off of my property and when you turn him back to the pasture he doesn't even go to her.
     
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    11-08-2013, 12:20 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I'm confused. Why are you saying your horse is buddy sour then isn't and then basically saying he is again?
Do not give your green horse an excuse to act up! He threw you off cause he could. Not good.
As far as tying them. I don't know why you can't feed them at the same time.
And the mare freaks when they are together? Sorry your post is a little confusing.
It wouldn't be my first choice to tie... is she going to stand there for days??
Do you have a stable or somewhere safe to put her? If nothing else has worked you can try it, just go slow. There are a lot of great threads on here on that topic. I would search buddy sour and do some research.
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    11-08-2013, 01:05 PM
  #3
Foal
My horse is fine until she screams then he has to get to her. He threw me because when a horse wants you off he can get you off. He needed to get to her because she was yelling for him.

That being said I only need to stop her from yelling when she is alone. She can turn an extremely docile horse dangerous because they feel like their buddy is in danger and have to see that she is ok.

The tying is meant for her to feel restricted when she is with him and free when he is gone. They will be tied together for a couple hours and the feeding at seperate times I heard worked for a trainer because the horses resented each other a little. Then I will stall one and turn the other loose. So when they are together they are tied and apart they are loose. So they see it is better when the other is away for a little while.
     
    11-08-2013, 01:09 PM
  #4
Banned
Easy fix move him to a diffrent place problem solved mare can throw her tizzy after a day or so she"ll get over it.
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    11-08-2013, 01:18 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackTWH    
My horse is fine until she screams then he has to get to her. He threw me because when a horse wants you off he can get you off. He needed to get to her because she was yelling for him.

That being said I only need to stop her from yelling when she is alone. She can turn an extremely docile horse dangerous because they feel like their buddy is in danger and have to see that she is ok.

The tying is meant for her to feel restricted when she is with him and free when he is gone. They will be tied together for a couple hours and the feeding at seperate times I heard worked for a trainer because the horses resented each other a little. Then I will stall one and turn the other loose. So when they are together they are tied and apart they are loose. So they see it is better when the other is away for a little while.
Sounds like your horse is out of control and the mare is well being a mare. Don't think your plan is going to work id tie her up and take gelding away. Let her have her tizzy after about an hour she will be quite.

Now your gelding managed to dump you your going to have fun trying to ride him....hes going to unload you again. He learned he can. And theres why I don't care much for mares I own one but once she gone never again.
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    11-08-2013, 02:03 PM
  #6
Weanling
Mare or not I have seen this before in geldings as well. I see that your horse doesn't respect you as a leader..the one he needs to be with. I would work the crud out of him while the mare is having her fit. If he relaxes, you relax the pressure, when he acts heard bound you up the pressure.
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    11-08-2013, 02:34 PM
  #7
Green Broke
How often are you riding your horse, OP? Are there just the two horses in the field?

It's been my experience that two horses do easily become buddy sour as it goes to their nature as herd animals and the need for the security of a herd. It's a terrible thing for a horse to be separated and left behind. That is why, a cop out I agree but a workable and worthwhile one, I have a fourth horse who's sole job it is to act as companion for the one horse left behind when I take one or two of mine out.

It's also been my experience that if you work regularly (as in daily, without fail - very important here) one horse while the other one is left in pasture that they do begin to understand and accept the routine. It starts with working/riding the one horse close, but separated from the other, by the fence and then increasing duration and distance over a period of time. In the case of just two horses, it also very helpful that both horses get equal time out of the pasture and working. If you are unable to do this your may want to look at getting a companion animal; as many here on the forum will tell you, it does not have to be another horse it can be a donkey, goat, llama, sheep, etc.

Hope you can find something that works for you.
     
    11-08-2013, 02:51 PM
  #8
Showing
The term sour, which we all use is a misnomer. It is all about security so perhaps we should use the term buddy bonded or herd/barn bonded. What I've done in a case like this is to start riding, or on foot, as to leave. As soon as she starts, head back. She will quit when she sees him, then leave again. It might take and hour but each time you will gain a little distance. What this is doing to her creates a yo-yo effect with her stress levels, going high then low, then high and low. Do it enough times and she'll stop screaming and settle down. That is when you keep going away. It will have the same effect on your horse as well. Animals, including us, can take only so much stress and the brain begins to muffle it.
     
    11-08-2013, 02:51 PM
  #9
Yearling
I have read through all the the thread and think I understand what it going on and what you are trying to do. While I think your on the right track I don't think tying them is the answer, when they are tied they have to much time to react and what you need to do is get them thinking. And feeding one and not he other is never a good idea, it is very stressful and since they don't reason, hold a grudge, or premeditate I cannot see it working. The best way to get them to think is moving their feet, make the right thing easy and wrong thing difficult. Make them uncomfortable for doing the wrong thing.

If the mare is not your responsibility then she should not be your concern to fix. You need to focus on your horse and he needs to respectful of you regardless of what the mare or any other horse is doing. I would not tie the mare, I would just not worry about her. Work your horse near the mare where you can work him in site of the mare, hustle his feet and get him breathing heavy make him want air. Take him away from the mare to rest, let her do whatever she is going to do, remember not your problem. If your horse starts acting silly and wants to back to her then take him back and work him some more hustle his feet, when he wants air take him away to rest. Eventually he will figure out being near the whiny mare gets him nothing but work and he will be happy to ignore her. It may take a couple sessions but he will figure out being away from her is much better then being near her. Now if you really want to help the mare get over her issue, and you have the space, and your able you can ride your horse in with the mare but chase her around make her move her feet and get her wanting air. Then leave with your horse, if she starts yelling go back and chase her some more, both horses will decide that is best to be apart because when they are together they have to work.

Horses are herd animals, safety in numbers yadda, yadda. So I get the mares anxiety, and it only takes one horse to upset a barn. What you need to do get your horse to look to you as his leader and ignore the other horses when he is with you. If you plan on showing, trail riding no matter what you plan to do your going to run into other horses and your horse needs to know he can look to you for safety and direction. Get him to see you as his herd leader, by moving his feet, and his wanting to run back to the other mare will go away by itself. Good luck to you.
     
    11-08-2013, 09:00 PM
  #10
Trained
I too am confused by your 'plan' & it doesn't sound reasonable to me. I don't see any point whatsoever in tying them up together or feeding them separately. I see more trouble than pointlessness associated with letting the mare loose when she carries on & with allowing your horse to return to her when she does. That is only further reinforcing the undesirable behaviour of both horses.

If you want to use 'approach & retreat' type tactics to desensitise them to being separated with minimal stress, you need to do virtually the opposite of what you've suggested. Eg. Start taking your horse 'away' to only whatever distance/time that it's not going to cause the horses to panic(which is sort of beyond learning so counterproductive), only be mildly concerned. That will give the most chances of reinforcing the correct behaviour. Return the horses to eachother ONLY when they're NOT 'misbehaving'. Obviously, given her experience at panicking & that her behaviour - and your horse's 'lack of control' seems to have been reinforced repeatedly in the past, that will likely be a very long-winded process.

So... I agree largely with gssw & if the mare doesn't belong to you, I'd forget about doing anything with her, for starters. It sounds like you have your hands perhaps a little too full with just dealing with your own horse anyway & would benefit from some experienced help/company, for the time being.

I don't tend to agree with the idea of take him away to rest him(although absolutely make it as Good and reinforcing as possible when he's calmly ignorring her) & work him whenever near the mare. For one, horses live in the instant & if the mare carries on & you then allow your horse to go to her, you've just reinforced that behaviour, regardless what you do next. Secondly, he's not going to associate just being with her with punishment if he lives with her anyway. The association is that you are in the picture at that time. This punishment may also not be enough to counter the *motivation* for the 'bad' behaviour anyway. Thirdly, I don't like to 'work' a horse as punishment, but want my horses to *enjoy* their 'work' & look at it as a Good Thing.

BUT I would be working with your horse in sight of the mare for now. Because the problem is that your horse is obviously not yet trusting & respectful of you, so more inclined to listen to her. IOW the mare's not the problem & he's not 'buddy sour' but 'rider sour', or 'buddy sweet'. So I would build your relationship with him where he's most comfortable & therefore likely to listen to you & once he's seeing you as a trusted leader, then start asking for things he isn't comfortable about, such as leaving his screaming girlfriend.
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