Ugh horrible ride today, opinions please...
 
 

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Ugh horrible ride today, opinions please...

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  • The wind yesterday and today is just too nasty to ride in

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    10-15-2012, 08:27 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Ugh horrible ride today, opinions please...

So the last few months have been going great with Lizzy dear. We are still working on listening in a snaffle and as of now it is only used in the arena where I can lock us in. I usually use a shanked broken bit for trails, yes I understand this is not ideal but that is why I spend many hours per week working in the snaffle. But that's not the issue here well kind of, she won't stop with a snaffle, she has gotten so much better but every now and then will give me issues.... She was in her full cheek snaffle with a running martingale (she will throw her head up when she's pissed).

Today she was super calm, almost to the point of you know something has to go wrong she can't be THAT good today. Well we were riding with another horse that we have never ridden with, just over to the arenas. This other horse, to put it very nicely, is currently a canidate for the glue factory. He needs a lot of refresher work. Well he's acting up, rearing kicking the whole nine yards. So I go to the arena next to the one he is going into. His pal back in the paddock is screaming for him.

Lizzy still isn't completely over her barn sour issues. I cannot ride out alone if the barn gets out of sight. I can ride in the arenas no problem but she can still see the barn there.

Anyway she gets an attitude she hasn't had since we started our serious training this spring. Flying bucks, rears, bolting, dropping her inside shoulder as she bucks and swings in a circle. Just all around nasty. Oh yea and lining up to jump out of the arena

I've been told I was over thinking her issues but I feel like we might have some serious work with barn sourness to work on?? I feel like with the horse acting up and his pal screaming back at the barn that she just did not want to be in the arena. The other one I was riding with thinks it was just because I wasn't in the same arena. A little of both maybe?

I've taken her over there with other horses and rode in different arenas many many times with no problems. But like I said I cannot ride out alone so I really think this is an issue with being barn sour. To be clear she has never been with the other horse that was making noise.

After about 20 minutes of trotting around and she worked up a very good sweat she calmed down.

So am I overthinking her issues or what? Please be nice, I cannot afford a trainer right now but we have come so far in just a few months. Constructive criticism is welcome but not meanness.

And just to add, last week we rode out on the trails in her snaffle. Running through fields and everything and maintained control, stop took a little longer but nothing dangerous.
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    10-16-2012, 07:38 AM
  #2
Green Broke
I believe you did well by trotting her until she calmed down. 20 minutes isn't too long. You didn't say, but you could have continued working her after that, too.

I'm wondering if working on transitioning from on gait to another might help her be more responsive? You have probably done this to some extent or you wouldn't have made the progress the two of you have. But, some good drills are walk to canter to trot to canter to walk to... Circles in and out. Serpentines at the walk and trot with halts. Reversing. Stopping during a reverse. Play around with those. See how you can use your legs and seat to get the changes in speed and direction.

Standing. For a long time. 5 or 10 minutes. Longer if you can stand to.
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    10-16-2012, 07:41 AM
  #3
Trained
IMO, she doesn't respect you and lacks confidence in you. You're not her leader. I think you should do a lot less riding and focus more on groundwork and manners and respect for a few weeks. If you can get some Clinton Anderson groundwork videos - either through giddyupflix or stream it through his website if you can't find them used - and work on those exercises. You will learn how to control her body and it really does an excellent job of establishing yourself in the leader role.

Good luck!
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    10-16-2012, 08:04 AM
  #4
Trained
I love Boots advice......but I probably would work in some groundwork also. You need to stop paying attention to all going on around you and focus on her, and she on you. Concentrate (like I bet you did during the trotting that settled her down) on her focusing on YOU. She should not be allowed to focus anywhere else. Totally agree with working on her responsiveness to subtle cues rather than the bit. Use your seat and shift your weight to slow her down, you can also use your breathing. When you stop her-deep breath out and relax with your seat deep, feet forward. And, practice standing, as Boots said-being a parking attendant, as I call it.
Personally I just think she was feeling good, so she tested you.They all do that sometimes.
     
    10-16-2012, 08:09 AM
  #5
Showing
Have you ever thought about putting her back in her stall when she's done well? This is a huge reward for the horse. Training sessions don't have to be long, it's about removing the pressure when the horse does as you ask. Obviously the pressure for her is leaving her buddy. I like to reward a horse for leaving with a pan of treats but start this with ground work. The horse is returned immediately after the treats are eaten. The pan is gradually moved farther away and the horse stays out a little longer. Before you know it the horse will be looking for the pan and will show no concern about it's buddy. You could also try walking the horse on a lead away and the moment it wants to return, take it back but not quite as far. You keep walking back and forth only going as far as the horse can tolerate then heading back. This has the effect of stress, release, stress, release. It may take an hour but horses can take only so much of this and will relax and keep going.
     
    10-16-2012, 08:28 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Thank you all. I did continue to work her a bit after until she could walk calmly. She is an arab so it takes a little longer to get her energy out. She wont stand, it's an issue we have been working on since day one. She will stand tied all day and wont move a muscle or if on a lead but undersaddle she just wants to go, go, go. I have spent hours working on her standing, doing circle when she wont then try again. The problem that I run into, as I don't mind doing circles all day, she will rear when she's pissed. I do not want to put a tie down on her as I'm trying to work this out. I use the running martingale to keep her from throwing her head into mine but it's loose enough that she can still rear with it. These are little rears only about a foot or so off the ground and rare but I know she will if pushed to far. She used to be a holy terror so this is a lot better than before.

She is a very pushy horse and it doesn't help that we have rearranged her little "herd" so I think she is trying to push herself up there as well.

I try to talk to her the whole time she's acting up to try to keep her listening to me. She is trained very well on verbal cues. The first 4 months of ownership was ground work as she was way to skinny and weak to ride so we got the ground work thing down. About once a week to two weeks I take her into the round pen to work on some things on the ground but she gets bored with that quickly and all the poles and stuff are at the arenas.

The thing is the horse calling for the other gelding is not my horses buddy. Never been even paddocked next to each other. We go on trail rides at least once a week sometimes more and she is perfectly fine leaving the barn as long as there's another horse with her.

If I'm on the ground she will go wherever I want her to. She is rarely tied up as she listens like a dog, haha she knows stay and come. And she makes sure to stay out of my bubble. If I put a hand up that means she is too close and she will move away.

I also ride in the arena by myself all the time. Most of the time my schedule doesn't match up with anyone elses so we go work by ourselves and she is usually very good. She is a pretty hot horse so sometimes she needs a few laps to get energy out and settle down but that is usually about 3 minutes tops.

Oh and she was perfect when I put her in the stall after to eat her dinner. She doesn't stay stalled, she is outside 24/7 so she usually throws a royal fit if I leave her in past the time she's done eating but last night she was perfect.

Ok I think I responded to everything haha.
     
    10-16-2012, 11:12 AM
  #7
Weanling
Warm up, warm up, warm up - on the ground whether round pen or on lunge line. Don't rush it, it will take as long as it takes.
     
    10-16-2012, 01:54 PM
  #8
Green Broke
The plan for tonight is to try riding her out away from the barn, our usual trails but by ourselves. I will lunge her first to get out some energy and if she's being a butt I will head to the arena for some more work first then out through the fields.
     
    10-16-2012, 02:29 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
With a horse that is as distractable and impulsive as this mare, YOU need to be super focussed. YOu cannot allow her antics to direct your thinking. If she is doing things that indicate her focus in on the barn or the other horses, you must not allow your focus to follow hers. YOu have to be deaf to all that distraction and stay absolutely zeroed in on her. Like you turn off the volumne, so you cannot hear the outside world, and watch your horse like a hawk.

When she starts to act up, say , "Whatever . . . ." , like none of that matters.

Doing lots of trotting is good, and if you can allow her to stretch her head down while trotting, this will help. Teach her to lower her head, both from the ground and with you in the saddle.
Don't canter if she is uptight. Canter is the gait of fleeing, and the mindset changes. Use trot, trot, trot, until she is begging to stop.

If she rears that little rear, spank her and make her go forward!
     
    10-16-2012, 02:37 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Thank you. When I go out tonight I will pay attention to where my focus is.

Last night we trotted until my legs burned so bad I couldn't sit in the saddle anymore. She was all huffy puffy when we started but by the end she had settled down. She will stretch her neck down to stretch it seems every once in a while.

I think I might need to carry a crop for her little misbehaviors as I don't want to let go of the reins to slap her, she can feel when I let go even if they are let all the way out.... sometimes she's just too smart haha.

It has been so windy here lately that she has been super jumpy at everything. But it wasn't all that windy yesterday and it isn't supposed to be today either.
     

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