Very nosey/bitey yearling gelding. - Page 2
   

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Very nosey/bitey yearling gelding.

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  • Horse over excited about food
  • Gelded yearling still biting

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    11-04-2012, 11:49 PM
  #11
Started
I don't give treats very often to my colts because they can get so excited about food they go to chomp with teeth instead of grabbing gently with there lips. My new colt Jackpot could of chomped my hands a few times luckily I have quick hands and noticed he change in his body language. Though unfortunately he snuck up on me a few times when I had my hands full of hay and has bitten me hard on my arm. One bite happened weeks ago but it's still sensitive because the bone is bruised or possibly a small fracture. So enough is enough and I took the lunge whip with me for a week and used the whip to make him respect my space. Also have been haltering him and making him respect my space as soon as he crowds or pushes me I back him of with a couple of downward bumps with the lead rope I also say back when I do this. Gotta make the colt respect you now its only going to get worse later. Some ground work is in order. I've been teaching jackpot to yield his hind quarters to touch, back up, desensitizing to the whip and other things. So now when I feed I can move both jet and jackpot with my body. When they invade my space I invade theirs and I put my arm up (might toss it up and down a few times and say back up). Mostly anymore I can say back up or get back and they go. I've taught both colts to come close to me when I ask. I hold out my hand and angle my body so I'm not directly facing them. Basically I'm pointing my shoulder at their head and asking them to join up with me. Just in two weeks he has improved a lot. Now when I bring feed or hay I'm not crowded they wait near the spot I leave their feed. When that colt gets pushy nippy ears pinned you back him away immediately. He needs a leader. Don't forget if he walked up and pinned his ears at another horse higher in the pecking order he'd get either get chased, bit, or kicked at. When he's nosing you he's bossing you. Try to stop it before he starts.
     
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    11-05-2012, 12:29 AM
  #12
Started
If you insist on using treats you need to do it right and need to set the rules/boundaries.
Food aggression/pushiness is absolutely unacceptable - 'back up' should be firm in every horse's vocabulary!! Every horse should back up with just the word, no matter what your body language at any given time, despite what you have in your hands - Always. That's very serious as Peppy pointed out the dangers of not enforcing personal space, particularly around food.

If you want to use treats here are rules to follow. First off, he needs to do something to get the treat - and that does not include pushing you around or moosing into your space. In fact he shouldn't even touch you. Personally I've been able to teach this skill without ever having to touch my horses, though solid bum-kickings would never be spared if the horse did something to deserve it.
Here's how I did it. I stood with my pockets full of tiny treats and waited. The horse of course would mug me, knock into my space, being rude in general. I'd ignore the behavior - my horses are not aggressive and respect my space well enough just to touch/sniff/nose and not become aggressive. If they were, I would have done this from the other side of the fence so the horse could not touch me. The very second they turn their head away from me, for any reason I would click (I use a smooch so I don't need to carry a clicker around) and give the treat. The click/smooch noise marks the exact act that you're looking for - of course they don't know this yet, but they quickly figure it out :) Repeat this until the horse learns the only way to get the treat out of your hand is by standing quietly, a respectful distance away with their head turned away. When you feed the treat do it arm's length away and feed slightly behind the chin so they need to back up a bit to help reinforce the personal space issue. In the case of a colt I'd use a small bowl also to feed the treat in until they're old/mature enough to learn how to take a treat without teeth.

Next you need to teach him all the basics- how to yield to pressure and all the basics - if you need I can go into further details with that.

Next you need to remember he's a baby and his attention span is quite limited, so learn your horse's span and don't go over it or you'll be setting yourself up to fail.


Remember he's a baby and you have many wonderful years ahead of you :) Enjoy your pony! Would love cute baby pictures ^^
     
    11-06-2012, 06:05 AM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladybug2001    
I bought this yearling back in June, but I've known him since a weanling. I know his background in training, but there was two months that I had no idea what was going on. Pretty much he was born in 2011 at my secondary school, halter broke there, and then sold as a yearling. I was one who got him ready to be sold and he had none of these habits prior. Pretty much since it was a school they had to do an auction on these horse, I bid on him three times and someone out bid me, which was no surprise because he was the best looking gelding out of all the others. A few months went buy, and who ever bought him put him up for sale and I snagged him... Well he came to my house with some bad habits. First off, he is the absolute nosiest horse I have ever seen! If he even thinks you have something for him, he is freakin' there, with his nose up your butt to see what you got. I could punch him in the face and all I would get is a broken hand. For the love of God, he ate a chicken egg because I didn't think he would be that stupid and let him mess with it to show I had nothing. So that is his bad habit, just always has his nose in your buisness. You give him a treat, he thinks you have a million more. He pins his ears back when you give him one and when you feed him. He use to push me every where and get into my bucket when I went to feed, but I broke him from that. He now stands off to the side with his ears back and waits for me to tell him he can eat. Though I'm at a loss on the treat/nosey issue. I've tried just waiting it out until he stops and puts his ears up, but he just goes right back to doing it. When he is trying to bite at me when I have one, I smack him. But he isn't understanding it....

Another thing that floors me, is he is extremely laid back dispite being an idiot most of he time. I can jump pratically ontop of him and he doesnt move a muscle. Though he is too tall for me to actually put full weight on. Except my dad kinda stood on the other side of him and pulled me to where I was fully on him and he just sat there... So its not that he is a bad horse that he has these issues.

I guess I would like to know everyone elses thoughts on how to approach this. A lot of people say just not to give horses treats, but I like treating my horses. My other three know better and I want him to know better so he stops teaching my 8 month old colt bad manners....
I agree with CLaporte. You have to STOP treating him and he needs to learn about body space. He has bad manners and I'm afraid you are going to have to spend some time in re-training him. You get out what you put in. I love treating my horses too but only when they get things right and do what I ask (and I get frowned upon for doing it) but they know how far to go. Even the Spanish Riding School treat their horses but only when they have done something good. Have a look at this Vid which shows how to establish space with your horse. Its Frederic Pignon who is an absolute genius with horses. Copy his body language exactly and you will start to get results. It has worked with several horses I have come acress including two of my own.
JF Pignon clinic in stockholm, PART I - YouTube
JF Pignon clinic in stockholm, PART II - YouTube
JF Pignon clinic in stockholm, PART III - YouTube
     
    11-06-2012, 06:46 AM
  #14
Green Broke
Why on earth do you think it is a good idea to put your full weight on a yearling's back? Seriously?
     
    11-06-2012, 08:52 AM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
Why on earth do you think it is a good idea to put your full weight on a yearling's back? Seriously?
Oh yeah I forgot to say something about that please don't put any weight on your horses back you could ruin him for life. I had a friend who bought a yearling colt because she heard the owner was getting on his back and she felt sorry for him. Unfortunately it was too late his joints and his back were ruined the colt was in so much pain. She tried to rehab him but it just didn't work out well. She felt it was the humane thing to do and had him out down. You got to remember the joints and the bones are still growing the really don't start fusing till around the age of 3. If you want to desensitize his back put a saddle pad on there. Ever see a horse with a sway back or a sucked down really low. A lot of that's from people getting on a horse too little in growth maturity and they permentally injure the spine. Don't ruin your baby for life.
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    11-07-2012, 02:47 AM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PunksTank    
If you insist on using treats you need to do it right and need to set the rules/boundaries.
Food aggression/pushiness is absolutely unacceptable - 'back up' should be firm in every horse's vocabulary!! Every horse should back up with just the word, no matter what your body language at any given time, despite what you have in your hands - Always. That's very serious as Peppy pointed out the dangers of not enforcing personal space, particularly around food.

If you want to use treats here are rules to follow. First off, he needs to do something to get the treat - and that does not include pushing you around or moosing into your space. In fact he shouldn't even touch you. Personally I've been able to teach this skill without ever having to touch my horses, though solid bum-kickings would never be spared if the horse did something to deserve it.
Here's how I did it. I stood with my pockets full of tiny treats and waited. The horse of course would mug me, knock into my space, being rude in general. I'd ignore the behavior - my horses are not aggressive and respect my space well enough just to touch/sniff/nose and not become aggressive. If they were, I would have done this from the other side of the fence so the horse could not touch me. The very second they turn their head away from me, for any reason I would click (I use a smooch so I don't need to carry a clicker around) and give the treat. The click/smooch noise marks the exact act that you're looking for - of course they don't know this yet, but they quickly figure it out :) Repeat this until the horse learns the only way to get the treat out of your hand is by standing quietly, a respectful distance away with their head turned away. When you feed the treat do it arm's length away and feed slightly behind the chin so they need to back up a bit to help reinforce the personal space issue. In the case of a colt I'd use a small bowl also to feed the treat in until they're old/mature enough to learn how to take a treat without teeth.

Next you need to teach him all the basics- how to yield to pressure and all the basics - if you need I can go into further details with that.

Next you need to remember he's a baby and his attention span is quite limited, so learn your horse's span and don't go over it or you'll be setting yourself up to fail.


Remember he's a baby and you have many wonderful years ahead of you :) Enjoy your pony! Would love cute baby pictures ^^
I forgot to mention, do not under any circusmtances attempt to get on your yearling's back no matter how much other people tell you to give it a try! It would be our equivalent of a 2 year old toddler trying to give a 14 year old a ride on their shoulders. You will end up damaging him forever and may never be able to ride him again. You leave him well alone until he is ready to be backed at 2 or 3.
     
    11-07-2012, 04:11 PM
  #17
Foal
Now, don't go hating me for saying this but my familys old method for horses who bites someone we'd put hot sauce or salt on the part of the body that they bit the most or the metod I use now is a light but effective tud on the nose
     
    11-08-2012, 06:52 AM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasCowgirlInWy    
Now, don't go hating me for saying this but my familys old method for horses who bites someone we'd put hot sauce or salt on the part of the body that they bit the most or the metod I use now is a light but effective tud on the nose
There are lots of different methods and yours seems ok to me as they do the horses no harm. The only thing I would say about salt is that horses do like the taste of it so it may not end up being much of a deterrent. My yearling is addicted to Himmilayan Salt Licks (LOL). Anyway, the best chastisement I ever saw being given to a horse was as follows: Young horse was trying to be moved to another part of the field but it wanted to stay and play with its buddies. This young horse started nipping and biting. It obviously thought it was play biting but it went a bit too far and actually drew blood. Well the victim of this had had enough and a swift brutal smack was administered to the young horse's side followed by verbal chastisement and a pinch on the withers. Result? Young horse did as it was told IMMEDIATELY. Now before you start screaming about animal cruelty and never hitting a horse etc. It was no human which delivered the punishment, it was a horse! In fact it was the lead mare who wanted to move the herd to another part of the field. Now I would NOT advise that anyone try this with their horse with you playing the role of the mare, it just demonstrates that all horses will try their luck with boundaries and need to be put back in their place. Chastisement needs to be swift and immediate to have effect but it is essential that it is not 'overdone'.
     

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