Want to try training youngster
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Want to try training youngster

This is a discussion on Want to try training youngster within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        10-25-2009, 03:26 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Want to try training youngster

    I recently got out of a bad horsey situation that involved an unhalter broke gelding who used rearing and kicking as his first reaction. The entire experience was somewhat eye opening, and I ended up working with a trainer on a daily basis so that I could have some semblance of control over this horse while I worked out what to do.

    Now, his is an entirely different story, but now that I've experienced actually working with a nearly wild horse, I'm interested in learning how to train a young unbroke horse. The trainer I worked with during that time said I could totally train my own horse from the ground on up with minimal help, she said I had all the right stuff going for me.

    So I got to thinking about it, and decided I would try to find a young 2, at most going on 3 yr old, who had a nice temperament, the kind of horse who makes a kids mount after a few years of maturing and training, and who is halter broke, and good with feet and vetting already, and work with this same trainer training him/her.

    I did find a horse that fit my criteria, but have been getting a lot of discouraging feed back about how green trainers shouldn't train a horse. I've been riding for 10 years, I wouldn't say I'm amazing, but I'm definitely intermediate/advanced. I can ride green broke horses no problem, and continue their training with a good coaches help. I do not have any problem working side by side with a trainer for my first time, and certainly when the situation merits it, I don't mind "handing over the reins" to my experienced trainer to do the job right the first time.

    So I guess what I am saying, is am I being realistic about this? Should I reconsider? The mare I found is literally perfect, a total 1 on the scale, already halter broke, picks up her feet like a doll, stands nice for the farrier and vet....With an experienced trainer, and later coach, is it possible for a first time trainer to be successful training an unbroke horse?

    Sorry for the long post...its part vent I think
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        10-25-2009, 03:37 AM
      #2
    Yearling
    I think you should go for it. Definitely. I have also trained a green horse that no one had ridden, and now he is jumping nicely and has wonderful paces. Unfortunately he wasn't mine, so when he was trained they sold him.

    It will be a good challenge and will raise your experience alot. Try it, and if you need help, have a coach available. Good luck. = )
         
        10-25-2009, 03:43 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    I personally think it would be a good idea. I mean, if you think about it, all trainers had to start somewhere, and you can't train a broke horse and learn, therefore you need an unbroke or greenhorse. So you definitely have to start somewhere, so go for it. Especially if you have a good trainer to help you if a problem does happen to arise. I have two 2 1/2 yr olds. I never trained before when I got my gelding as a yearling stud. I gelded him a month after having him and I did all his ground work myself. I did send him 30 days to a trainer after he was 2 yrs old, but if you think about it, I had to keep up with his training AND teach him other things that he didn't get a chance to learn in 30 days. Yes he was a very very well tempermented horse, so for me, it was a cinch. The filly I just got last month so I will be doing her training next spring as I will be letting both my babies sit through the winter.

    I have worked with rescues and wild babies before and for me that too was a cinch. I think patience is the key and also the knowledge. So good luck and keep us updated.
         
        10-25-2009, 04:18 AM
      #4
    Yearling
    I agree, with APHA. Everyone has got to start somewhere. I've got my first yearling and I'm training him with the help of my Mum and two amazing instructors.
    I think on the whole, you're being very realistic and will be quite fine and capable of training a youngster.
         
        10-25-2009, 07:30 AM
      #5
    Trained
    If you can walk, trot and lope with no hands on the reins and no feet in the stirrups you can ride well enough to train a horse. As long as you have someone to lean on for your first time I see no problem. Go for it.
         
        10-27-2009, 09:28 AM
      #6
    Started
    I think you qualify as someone ready to start... can't ever be experienced starting one if you never start! ;) You've got a trainer to help when needed, that's always important :)

    JMO but I"d look for a 3 y/o, because I don't think they should be started younger than that.
         
        10-27-2009, 10:12 AM
      #7
    Trained
    Go for it ! A young horse should definitely be easier/more rewarding than a wild one ! What breed is the horse you're looking at ?
    =]
         
        10-27-2009, 10:29 AM
      #8
    Foal
    I think it's possible, if you are able to ask to your trainer if you have a problem.

    My experience : I buy my mare last year (january), she was a little bit less than 3 years old. I have borke her alone, I did a lot of little errors, but I take the time to work, to check all points, and now, I like the result very much. We have a lot of thing to learn, but we will progress together.
    It's a great experience, and I think I am a better rider now. Thank you to her!
         
        10-27-2009, 10:46 AM
      #9
    Showing
    Personally I enjoy taking a horse from birth to saddle breaking. I've only done 3 and I don't consider myself an expert. Its great fun and knowing what the individual horse is capable of is a real plus. Have you thought about going younger?
    We have been saddle breaking 2 all summer and its OK,but I do think its more fun when they are itty bitty and everything is new to them.
    Good luck to you, I have faith that you will git er done
         
        10-27-2009, 01:19 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    I think you're being very realistic and have set an attainable goal. You've got some experience, have a fall back person, and have done your homework on a horse you think is suitable. Next step is to get a vet check and be on your way with her! I don't know how much I agree with the going younger, but 2-3 years old is a beautiful age. They know some of the basics like ground manners, picking feet, farrier, vet stuff, and possibly beginning round pen work...time for you to take over! I would ask the owners if they would consider a trial period for you to take her home for 2-4 weeks and get a real feel for her. Give her 3-5 days to settle with just grooming, then I would get right into the training and see how she handles it. Don't want to baby her on the trial period and have her explode if she's going to when the real work begins...the point of it is to see how she handles a little bit of pressure.

    Good luck, keep us posted, and be sure to post updates with pics if/when you do bring her home!
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    feed for a youngster jazzyrider Horse Health 12 01-27-2009 06:19 AM
    How to move a youngster forward jewlz Horse Training 17 05-25-2008 05:26 AM
    Bringing on a Youngster! jemma_bailey Horse Training 17 05-19-2008 09:50 PM
    Teaching a youngster headset?? Jumpit007 Horse Training 7 10-31-2007 10:02 PM
    need a youngster blaze1 Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 02-26-2007 06:46 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:14 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0