Warning, long: When is it time to get off the horse? - Page 4
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Warning, long: When is it time to get off the horse?

This is a discussion on Warning, long: When is it time to get off the horse? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree67Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-27-2013, 03:41 AM
      #31
    Green Broke
    Honestly, you need to give up on this horse if the owner has anything to do with it still.

    You are not ever going to get anywhere and may well end up getting seriously hurt with her. The owner will keep on until this horse either has it's mind blown completely, or it becomes so dangerous that no one can handle it.

    Your working with this mare is fruitless. The owner will undo anything you have accomplished.

    This horse is not the problem. The human is.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-27-2013, 03:52 AM
      #32
    Foal
    Well, like I've stated before, she was brought in to our barn for training. So I don't think it's exactly an option to send it back and say I'm not training your horse. And like I said, she does just fine with me, and since the first week when her problems became noticeable she has not displayed any overtly dangerous behaviors again-no more so than any other horse that comes in for training, or any green horse that is being started for the first time. Her misbehaving has boiled down to walking when mounting and walking in a circle when she is supposed to stand still. All this from the big blowouts I'd described earlier, which is serious progress.

    Unfortunately I think sometimes progress that is made in training is undone when the horse goes home. I am used to this. That doesn't mean I won't do my best to give the horse a head start.

    And to be frank- perhaps I am being optimistic- maybe it is the best thing that she gets refresher training right before she is sold, without going back to a rider that is not confident enough to act like a trainer on a regular basis. If someone who knows what they are doing comes along, then maybe she will have had a month or two of regular work with good training and the new owner can take over from there, instead of from where she was left off at previously.

    I think I was just disappointed to have seen such progress, and then realizing that that alone wasn't enough to give her disillusioned owner some new confidence.
         
        07-27-2013, 07:54 AM
      #33
    Super Moderator
    Congratulations! You did your job and you learned a lot about horse behavior in the process. This is not a good horse for this particular rider. This is not a good horse for any beginner or timid rider. They need a 'been there -- done that' older steady and calm horse and not an OTTB. So, he is better off sold. It is not your responsibility to see that he goes to the right kind of rider. We'll just hope he does.

    Let me give you one more hint about these kinds of horses, particularly when you are unsure of what kind of owner they will go to next:

    Take a video of her with you riding her doing all of these different things from standing still, being saddled, mounted and going all of the places you can ride her. You never know when someone will call you a liar or say that you never got any of these things done with her. You will feel a lot better and will have proof of how this horse rode with proper handling and riding. People are so quick to blame you or the horse rather than themselves, that a short video of how she actually rode with you is priceless.

    Good luck to both of you. Cherie
    smrobs, bsms, BossHoss and 3 others like this.
         
        07-27-2013, 08:25 AM
      #34
    Yearling
    Welcome to the training world!!! It may be a good thing they want to sell her--if they find a leader like yourself, what a wonderful horse they will have! I have trained these kind before, and they go to good homes(my definition is apparently different than some) and you never hear from them again.
    Then you sell the kindest, easiest horse to someone and they call you constantly....he does this, he does that, he nips at me, he walks away...and I just have to say sorry, I NEVER had that happen, and I raised them.....

    Congratulations to you on being a really GOOD horseperson.

    Nancy
         
        07-27-2013, 09:20 AM
      #35
    Showing
    Fully agree with Cherie. The wrong purchaser will bad mouth you all over the countryside because the horse reverts to it's old behaviour. I long ago learned that the rider is taught along with the owner. That's a toughie since you don't own the horse.
         
        07-27-2013, 11:02 AM
      #36
    Started
    One option that will give you control over where the horse goes is to buy her (maybe the owner will make you a heck of a deal) and then move her on to a rider with enough ability and confidence to enjoy her. Other than that, you do your job and hope for the best for the horse.
    It would be good if people used their heads instead of their hearts when acquiring a horse in the first place...but that isn't likely to happen anytime soon.
    smrobs and natisha like this.
         
        07-27-2013, 11:27 AM
      #37
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dustbunny    
    One option that will give you control over where the horse goes is to buy her (maybe the owner will make you a heck of a deal) and then move her on to a rider with enough ability and confidence to enjoy her. Other than that, you do your job and hope for the best for the horse.
    It would be good if people used their heads instead of their hearts when acquiring a horse in the first place...but that isn't likely to happen anytime soon.
    Agree or maybe you could try to sell her for the owners out of your barn. Then they would never have to deal with her again.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        07-27-2013, 02:10 PM
      #38
    Started
    When a horse does something I didn't like while on his back - I will ride him and work him until he learns it wasn't such a good idea and starts behaving better. At the end of the ride if he acts up, I will continue to ride him and work him until he starts behaving better.
    If you get off a horse when he is doing something bad - whether you start working him from ground or not - then that tells the horse that what he did was good and he should continue to do that because when he does that - you get off of him.
    But if you only dismount when he is doing good, then that will teach the horse that the only way you will dismount him is if he is being good.

    That is just the way I see things.
         
        07-27-2013, 09:42 PM
      #39
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    If you get off a horse when he is doing something bad - whether you start working him from ground or not - then that tells the horse that what he did was good and he should continue to do that because when he does that - you get off of him.
    This is how it is supposed to work, but not all horses have read that play-book. I can think of several times I have bailed and just felt lucky to get off with my life and hopefully could hang on to the horse.

    I remember when I had a horse bolt down a steep mountainside, barely able to stay on his feet. I managed to run him into a pine tree where I bailed. It was so steep it took me over a hour to walk and climb back to the trail at the top of the mountain.

    I bailed one time when I was on a spoiled horse that was headed for a 4 lane highway.

    I bailed another time when a horse was headed for a tight barbed wire fence, running sideways and completely cold-jawed.

    It is not unusual to re-train spoiled horses and think you have one ready to go out (sometime one that's been out several times) and them have a 'come-apart' and you have to save your life and hopefully save the horse, get back to the ranch and go back to the drawing board. Your first job is to stay safe. S*** happens in the spoiled horse business.
         
        07-28-2013, 11:10 AM
      #40
    Trained
    It sounds like the owner may be making a good decision. I didn't know how to ride when I bought my first horse. She was advertised as "perfect for a beginner". I had done a little riding 30 years earlier, so how hard could it be? Just buy a horse that was perfect for a beginner, and learn...

    Well, lesson #1 was that people lie. Perhaps their refusal to let me lead her from the ground, and only ride her in a 'round pen' that was about 35' across, should have been a red flag.

    What I wanted was a calm, been-there, done-that kind of horse. Instead, I had a spooky, fearful horse who would bolt and squirt diarrhea out the back in fear. But I liked her, and she seemed to like me, and we're still together after 5+ years...but I also have a nagging back injury that bothers me 4.5 years later, and I ride in a defensive mode because I've needed to do so. Some of my many faults as a rider are due to the bolts and countless sideways jumps that have occurred on my favorite horse.

    In some ways, it has been good. She has taught me things a mellow horse would never have taught me. And her personality has caught my interest in ways a calmer horse would not have done. I ride her often enough for no better reason than I enjoy her company. But to be honest, there are days I would LOVE to get on a calm, relaxed horse and just go out for an easy ride.

    The professional trainer I hired (who did wonders with Mia) said Mia will never be an easy horse. She said Mia is one of those horses who view every ride as an adventure. The plus side is that she puts a lot of effort into each ride. The minus is that she expects her rider to put a lot of effort into each ride...

    No one else in my family wants to ride her. Except for my daughter-in-law, they have all ridden her, and none of them liked it. She didn't buck, throw a fit or do anything wrong, but they felt like they couldn't relax. They couldn't drop the stirrups and enjoy the scenery because Mia isn't that type of horse. They would sell her in a moment. And for them, that would be the right decision. Recreational riding should be fun - but people have differing ideas about what is fun.

    The picture below illustrates 2 types of horses, and 2 types of riders. Neither is 'wrong', but the rider on the right would never be happy riding the horse on the left:

         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Reflection - warning...long fkonidaris Horse Talk 10 12-14-2012 08:17 AM
    My Struggles! *WARNING long!!* The Northwest Cowgirl Horse Talk 4 10-13-2012 10:53 AM
    What would you do?? *warning long post* angelghost Horse Talk 62 10-07-2012 10:18 AM
    How can I help my horse? Warning Long! Beanieman Horse Training 8 12-21-2011 11:59 PM
    Horrific Horse Injury - extremly long (Warning, Graphic Pictures) ~Freedom Rider~ Horse Health 100 11-09-2009 05:49 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:50 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0