Weight Limit for 2y/o filly? - The Horse Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 15 Old 02-16-2010, 12:16 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 193
• Horses: 2
Question Weight Limit for 2y/o filly?

My Quarab filly just turned 2 years old January 16th. She is 13.3-14hh and 675-685lbs (I used a weight tape today). She has more of the quarter horse build than the arab. Very round! We've been working with her from day one with training and such. What I was curious about though is how much weight she could carry. If we did start riding her this year it wouldn't be until, at the VERY earliest, late summer, but most likely late fall. I'll probably weight untill the spring of '11 though. If I did get on her this year though, mind you, I wouldn't be trying to ride her real hard or anything of course. Just walking around a little bit and getting her used to things and probably getting myself tossed off! haha jking.. kinda..

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. -Emerson
Shananigan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 02-16-2010, 12:22 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 790
• Horses: 6
I think it depends how she carries it...I know a 15hh appy cross that looks fat at 1000lbs, and a 14.1hh welsh pony than looks thin at 950lbs. It depends on body type, muscle mass, and overall how they carry it. I'd like to see a picture of your filly...

<a href=http://i1190.photobucket.com/albums/z457/JustusNow2011/banner.png target=_blank>http://i1190.photobucket.com/albums/...011/banner.png</a>
Never ride faster than your guardian angel can fly
EveningShadows is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 02-16-2010, 12:50 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 193
• Horses: 2
I'm trying to download pictures of her that I took with my phone today, but I'm having some issues! Haha I have some pictures of her on my computer, but they aren't recent. Here are a few, but like I said they are old. This was last summer so she was only about a year old. She is now bigger and has changed color because she is eventually going to be a grey (most likely flea-bitten grey). Just to give you an idea, her tail almost touches the ground and her legs, mane, and tail are black. Plus she's more preportionate (spelling?). Like I said, these are just to give you an idea! Also, in the one pic with all the sticks she was only there for a few seconds after I took it I scooted her outta there, but with the angle it looks 10x worse than it was!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Animals 060.jpg (90.9 KB, 157 views)
File Type: jpg Animals 059.jpg (102.0 KB, 157 views)
File Type: jpg Animals 082.jpg (103.2 KB, 153 views)

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. -Emerson
Shananigan is offline  
post #4 of 15 Old 02-16-2010, 09:45 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 790
• Horses: 6
Hard to tell if you have a chubby 2 year old by just looking at yearling pics...but she looks like a solid little girl. I wouldn't worry about her being overweight unless it's an obvious hay belly or it's affecting her feet...at such a young age, growth spurts happen over a matter of weeks. She could shoot up 2 inches and spread whatever extra weight she has into looking like she's a little slender.

As for riding 2 year olds, I personally see nothing wrong with asking them to accept a rider and walk around the yard after long reining is done and they understand whoa, turns, and voice commands for walk and trot. I think worry comes when you just jump on a 2 year old that has never been worked with. No ground training or long rein work - getting on a 2 year old that doesn't understand these things, it's way more likely for them to pitch a bucking fit out of frustration and not understanding and THAT'S what's going to damage their joints. Bucking with a rider with open joints will cause ALOT more stress on their bodies than a calm couple laps around the yard with an extra 140 pounds on them. It depends what you've done with her so far to help her understand what's expected once the rider's on her. If she's only worn a saddle once or twice and never seen the bridle or long reins, I'd say hold off and do the leg work first...that being said, most of my youngsters were introduced to ALL the tack and equipment as yearlings, long reined since and into their 2 year old year, so when I stepped up on them as 2-2 1/2 year olds, it was naturally the next step and they accepted me gracefully and calmly. It's really a judgment call.

<a href=http://i1190.photobucket.com/albums/z457/JustusNow2011/banner.png target=_blank>http://i1190.photobucket.com/albums/...011/banner.png</a>
Never ride faster than your guardian angel can fly
EveningShadows is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 02-16-2010, 10:01 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: In the barn whenever possible.
Posts: 1,910
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by EveningShadows View Post

As for riding 2 year olds, I personally see nothing wrong with asking them to accept a rider and walk around the yard after long reining is done and they understand whoa, turns, and voice commands for walk and trot. I think worry comes when you just jump on a 2 year old that has never been worked with. No ground training or long rein work - getting on a 2 year old that doesn't understand these things, it's way more likely for them to pitch a bucking fit out of frustration and not understanding and THAT'S what's going to damage their joints. Bucking with a rider with open joints will cause ALOT more stress on their bodies than a calm couple laps around the yard with an extra 140 pounds on them. It depends what you've done with her so far to help her understand what's expected once the rider's on her. If she's only worn a saddle once or twice and never seen the bridle or long reins, I'd say hold off and do the leg work first...that being said, most of my youngsters were introduced to ALL the tack and equipment as yearlings, long reined since and into their 2 year old year, so when I stepped up on them as 2-2 1/2 year olds, it was naturally the next step and they accepted me gracefully and calmly. It's really a judgment call.

This is pretty much how I raise my youngsters. Here is a picture of Lillie as a yearling with a saddle. She was driven pretty much all around the farm last fall. So just like ES said..come this spring/summer, getting on her should be the next natural step. I plain to do some light riding with her this summer/fall.



And here she is this winter..



She's appx 13.2-13.2 and weighs (last time I checked) appx 650 lbs.

I'd love to see current pics of filly.

"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed." -Ralph Waldo Emerson
Plains Drifter is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 02-18-2010, 01:37 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 193
• Horses: 2
Quote:
As for riding 2 year olds, I personally see nothing wrong with asking them to accept a rider and walk around the yard after long reining is done and they understand whoa, turns, and voice commands for walk and trot. I think worry comes when you just jump on a 2 year old that has never been worked with. No ground training or long rein work - getting on a 2 year old that doesn't understand these things, it's way more likely for them to pitch a bucking fit out of frustration and not understanding and THAT'S what's going to damage their joints. Bucking with a rider with open joints will cause ALOT more stress on their bodies than a calm couple laps around the yard with an extra 140 pounds on them. It depends what you've done with her so far to help her understand what's expected once the rider's on her. If she's only worn a saddle once or twice and never seen the bridle or long reins, I'd say hold off and do the leg work first...that being said, most of my youngsters were introduced to ALL the tack and equipment as yearlings, long reined since and into their 2 year old year, so when I stepped up on them as 2-2 1/2 year olds, it was naturally the next step and they accepted me gracefully and calmly. It's really a judgment call.
I've been putting a saddle on her since she was a yearling in those earlier pictures. She gracefully accepts the bit (actually, she loves it!!) I deffinatly wouldn't be getting on her without her knowing the basic commands (all of which you have mentioned). I'll be working on that stuff all this summer/fall and more!!! This summer I'm taking her up to my friend's house whom use to be a profesional English trainer! I wouldn't be jumping her really at all however. Maybe later down the road (like in a few years? She would definitely be fully matured before I started.) She'd be used mostly for trail riding, although she probably will ride english aswell!

I was able to get pics off my phone (finally!!) They were just real quick shots because I wasn't sure I could even do it! I'll get you guys more pictures of better quality tomorrow! Note: She is standing on a bit of a hill! Also, her head is kinda cranked around because I had treats in my had haha. I was going to post 3, but I have to load them online then resize them and I need to go to bed. I'll post more tomorrow!!!! Just to give you an idea! I took these day before yesterday! Also, do you think she'll dapple?



Quote:
This is pretty much how I raise my youngsters. Here is a picture of Lillie as a yearling with a saddle. She was driven pretty much all around the farm last fall. So just like ES said..come this spring/summer, getting on her should be the next natural step. I plain to do some light riding with her this summer/fall.
Oh, she's a cutie! Looks like she's going to be a stout little thing, judging by her winter pic! What breed is she? I'll be doing a ton of driving this summer with her too! By the way, not sure I mentioned this, but her name is Sasha!

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. -Emerson
Shananigan is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 02-18-2010, 04:12 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,011
• Horses: 24
Personally, I would give it at least another year before you even think of riding her at all. She is about the same size as my 7 month old colt but I wouldn't dream of riding him. Because she is so small, her muscles and bones will have to work so much harder to carry any weight at all because she is not accustomed to carrying any kind of weight, thus putting more wear and tear on immature body structure. I think the equation says that a horse can carry 20% of their body weight comfortably. If she is at most 700 pounds, that would be a total combined rider/tack weight of 140 pounds. I don't know about you, but my saddle weighs about 45 pounds so that would leave me 95 pounds for a rider. I personally am not comfortable on a horse much smaller than 900 pounds, especially one so young.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/

Last edited by smrobs; 02-18-2010 at 04:16 AM.
smrobs is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 02-18-2010, 03:30 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 193
• Horses: 2
Quote:
She is about the same size as my 7 month old colt but I wouldn't dream of riding him.
Well, yes I wouldn't dream of riding a 7 month old horse of any size either. He must be a bigger breed of horse (or had bigger parents), if he's only 7 months old and that size. Sasha is a Quarab, we own both parents. Rebel (the father), my QH is only 14.2-14.3 hh and our Arab mare, Dandy, is the same size maybe just a tad bit taller. Sasha is almost as big as them, and as I said I wouldn't be getting on till late summer probably late fall. She might even be 3 by the time if I wait till next spring. It depends. Also, even though not fully developed, she is more developed than a 7 month old. (sorry that sounds snooty, I'm not trying to be honestly!!!)

Quote:
I think the equation says that a horse can carry 20% of their body weight comfortably. If she is at most 700 pounds, that would be a total combined rider/tack weight of 140 pounds. I don't know about you, but my saddle weighs about 45 pounds so that would leave me 95 pounds for a rider.
That's a very good rule, I believe I'd heard of it, but it really wasn't imprinted in my head. Thank you! I'll definitely take that into consideration!

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. -Emerson
Shananigan is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 02-18-2010, 06:33 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 170
• Horses: 0
Zero. Well, the weight of the saddle would be okay.
Rule of Reason is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 02-19-2010, 05:54 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 4,510
• Horses: 2
As a note, the OP DID say she wasn't even considering riding until late this summer/fall, and probably not even until next spring. She's not discussing jumping on a fresh 2 year old.

That's essentially the age I started breaking Jynx to rider. I just started riding her in late fall (October) of 2009 and she'll be 3 years old as of April. I've kept my rides extremely short and productive, and I also spent a solid six months of ground work/driving on her every single day to ensure she would be ready for me.

Essentially, a young horses knees are closed by 2.5 - 3 years old. So joint issue really isn't an issue in the horse being ridden at that age. Your concern is the spine, which does not fully fuse until the animal is about 6 years old. Of course, it's much LESS fused at 2 years old. I take extreme care to ensure my horses are not going to be throwing rodeo fits underneath me - if you want to "break 'em out old school", then wait until that animal is a solid 3-4 years old.

I don't see any harm in light riding on a youngster that's had proper work put on it. I find their minds extremely moldable and inquisitive, as long as you're willing to take the time and patience to do it right. For some people, it's better to wait until 3-4 years old when you can get "tougher" with them and not worry, mentally or physically.

It's a fine line and not all horses are ready for it at a young age. Just don't push your filly any faster then she wants to go.

Quote:
I hope God tells her to smash her computer with a sledgehammer.

MacabreMikolaj is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there a limit to... 1dog3cats17rodents Horse Forum Support Help Desk 1 08-27-2009 11:03 PM
Whats the age limit to breeding? trickpony23 Horse Breeding 8 03-10-2009 06:24 PM
Stallions Age Limit for Breeding jofielder7 Horse Breeding 2 10-12-2007 02:09 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome