what could it be?
   

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what could it be?

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  • Teaching horse to be soft in dave

 
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    05-28-2007, 06:44 PM
  #1
Foal
what could it be?

I have been able to walk out to the pasture and get the halter and lead rope onto my horse with only a little coaxing. He usually "walks" away for a few minutes then gives in. For the past two days, he sees me and seriously "runs" as fast as he can all over the pasture. I figure its either:
A. He has discovered the semi-wild horses behind our fence recently and is showing off for the female. (they are out there grazing and not ridden)
B. My new sunscreen/bug repellant is an unfamiliar smell that he does not want to come near.

What do ya'll think?

I have tried treats but he just does not trust me anymore. I can be patient but I wonder what Id am doing wrong.
     
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    05-28-2007, 07:05 PM
  #2
Foal
Be patient and start to follow him carefully around the field and DO NOT offer any treats until he is out of the field and tied up.
If you approach him until he start running away, as soon as he runs stop and wait until he stops. You must then approach him again, stopping when he runs. Do not give in on this until he either shows signs of coming towards you or he allows you to come up to him directly and bring him in.
You must then work on making him realise that whatever is bothering him is no real problem and that he does actually want to come in with you - make sure his time out of the field is fun!
     
    06-23-2007, 11:03 AM
  #3
WLD
Foal
I have seen several of Dave's posts and he has some great suggestions. This one might not work. If you move towards your horse and he runs from the pressure of your presence and your response is stopping. Then you re-enforce in the horses mind that if he wants you to stop coming toward him all he has to do is run. No offense Dave.

I might suggest you get the horse, place him in a round pen, stall 24X24, or in a smaller area when you can use a lunge line. Someplace where it is easier to keep his attention, (example, while lunging his inside ear should be tilted towards you) putting him thru some ground excercises. When he drops his head, while lunging stop him and turn away. Looking away from him. Be patient and he will come up to you. Rub him, speak softly to him, thereby rewarding him. Now for this next step you need a round pen or a stall at least 24 feet square. Remove the halter so he is free to move away at will. Walk around him at a 45 degree angle from his head, back and forth getting closer then retreating and moving away. Go back and forth, slowly moving this curve closer and closer to him. (Oh, make sure you have the soft cotton lead line and halter on your shoulder) When you approach him close enough to touch him, only do it a a second or two and retreat, do this over and over again slowly increasing the time you spend rubbing him. Training him that your rubbing him is actually a reward.
Watch for the licking of lips, the slightly lowered head, the hind foot resting on the front of the hoof. All signs that he is relaxed.

Now with that said, if your horse should turn his hindquarters towards you, then he is being disrespectful to you. Take that soft cotton lead rope and make him face up to you, showing you the respect that he should.

If he runs back and forth in the stall or round pen, control his feet by only allowing him to run half way around before turning him and sending him the other way. Soon enough he will stop and face up to you.

If the horse is totally disrespectful and gets close enough to run you over take that soft cotton lead line and swing it, or spank him as he goes by. Teaching him that he needs to respect your space.

It will not hurt him, and probably save your life.
     
    06-23-2007, 03:41 PM
  #4
Started
You know the easiest way to make a horse be hard to catch? To only go to him when you want something. And not spending enough undemanding time with them. And not making the time you spend with them full of softness and quality.

So, here's what I would do. As you walk towards him pay attention to his ears especially. Don't walk in a straight line, mosey and kind of go back and forth along the path like you are drunk lol. If you ever watch horses come to say, the water tank, they never go in a straight line. They swirve, so you need to do the same. Now, you want both ears full forward on you. If at any time he peels one away STOP. That's him telling you you've hit his threshold and he isn't comfortable with you coming closer. Relax your body and wait. If he puts both ears full forward again you can proceed. But, if you are waiting and waiting and waiting and nothing is happening turn your belly button away from him. When you are facing square on at a horse that is a lot of pressure. When you get to him, scratch an itchy, give him a treat and then LEAVE. Don't halter him. This will blow his mind and he will become more curious.

Do this several times a day. And when you actually halter him don't have a work session, just take him out to eat grass. I would keep this up for a week, maybe less depending on how he reacts, maybe more. You'll be amazed at how this changes his perception of you.
     
    06-23-2007, 07:21 PM
  #5
Foal
No offence taken - each to his/her own technique.
The thought (and practice) behind my idea is that you are gradually asserting dominance over the horse as you are essentially preventing him/her from eating - in herd dynamics it will be the dominant member that eats first and hence you are acting this out. It also removes some of the appeal of being in the field in the first place. This usually works with me although I have met some more stubborn types who seem to have a lot more patience than I do!
I think your idea does work well too - I suppose that is horsemnanship really that you know various different techniques and when to apply them.
     
    06-23-2007, 08:03 PM
  #6
Started
Hi Dave-- Was your post directed to me? I'm not sure
     
    06-24-2007, 12:04 AM
  #7
WLD
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Singleton
No offence taken - each to his/her own technique.
The thought (and practice) behind my idea is that you are gradually asserting dominance over the horse as you are essentially preventing him/her from eating - in herd dynamics it will be the dominant member that eats first and hence you are acting this out. It also removes some of the appeal of being in the field in the first place. This usually works with me although I have met some more stubborn types who seem to have a lot more patience than I do!
I think your idea does work well too - I suppose that is horsemnanship really that you know various different techniques and when to apply them
.
You are right Dave, There are several ways to train a horse and different techniques may have different results on any number of horses. That is one of the many good things about a forum like this, it allows horse owners and trainers to read and learn a variety of training techniques. Thanks!
     
    06-24-2007, 09:16 PM
  #8
Foal
Sorry, should have clarrified - WLD
Your suggestions are great too though!

:) We should all start some stickies for our own problem solving techniques on the boards... to the suggestions board!
     
    08-09-2007, 07:44 AM
  #9
Foal
The approach....stop....retreat...continue approach also has other ties to animal behavior....

An animal that moves directly, assertively, and quickly towards its target is typically a predator

An animal that approaches....checks things out a bit....mebbe backs up a little...moves up some more....checks things out a bit....is typically a prey animal...

Think back to an episode of national geographic...how does the lion approach the watering hole? How does the antelope?

Horses are historically and instinctively programmed to be "prey"...hence the "fight or flight" mentality....until your horse trusts you and/or other humans virtually unconditionally....your direct approach may be sensed as a threat....

Eventually you can build that trust with your horse....in the mean time consider being a prey animal instead of a predator....
     

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