What to do when training methods differ?
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

What to do when training methods differ?

This is a discussion on What to do when training methods differ? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-09-2010, 09:10 AM
      #1
    Green Broke
    What to do when training methods differ?

    Hey everyone,
    So I have started working at a lovely barn helping the main trainer there break all of the 3 year olds on the property to saddle. The trainer has broken many horses (as have I), we are the same age (late twenties) however she is more of a western rider and I am definitely English. No problems there.

    The problem is that all these horses are supposed to be broken for English showing/dressage and I have some real problems with the accepted training methods, one in particular:

    As I was riding one of the green broken horses yesterday ( he has had less than six rides) I was working on basic walk-trot transitions, practicing bending and straightness at both gaits (mostly walk though). As I was doing this I was trying to encourage him to s-t-r-e-t-c-h his neck and reach for the bit as well as encouraging him to yield to leg contact by moving off my leg and onto the bit. This method means that they will not necessarily be 'in frame' straight away, however they will learn correctness of gaits and head carriage comes later, with training. So my problem is that I was told to quote "just give him loads of leg and a couple pops in the mouth, he knows he should have his head in". I was pretty horrified.

    I don't know if this is a difference between western training and english (feel free to let me know either way) and this is an accepted training method in some circles? Also don't know what to do in terms of saying something to have the current training method changed (any suggestions here?). I am new to the barn so don't particularly want to come in throwing punches but I wouldn't DREAM of training any horse this way.

    Sorry it is so long, thanks for reading.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-09-2010, 09:47 AM
      #2
    Banned
    It really depends...
    You need to ask the horse's owner.

    One barn I trained at (I am in my early 20's) you were expected to get the young horses "In and Out and on there Way" meaning you rushed things becuase THE OWNER expected you too.
    Usually I did a day of ground work, a day of taking up and sitting on the horse, and the next day down the trail we went.

    Another barn I worked at the owners had more money, expected more advanced horses, and wanted their animal to be happy as well as broke. At this barn you were expected to take your time, do the job correctly and go as slow or fast as your horse was able to go... I spent more time in the arena (becuase that is what the owners did) and less time on the trail (I don't think any of them trail rode)

    The the last barn I worked at was a bit more of a mix. Some owners wanted 30 days of training but they wanted you on the horse on day 1, others were more knowlegeable and wanted to go on to show so those horses we kept longer and did more with...

    So IMHO the owner OF THE HORSE is always right... either you give the owner what they are asking for or you tell them that honestly you arent what they are looking for and to find another trainer. You either take the money or you don't.
         
        05-09-2010, 04:04 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    That's a really good point, thanks for input. I met the owner today and we had a chat about the horse in question and she would like to do some dressage with him in the future although lacks the confidence to really ride him much at the moment. She also may want to do some trail riding in which case I guess correctness wouldn't matter as much.

    I did mention that if she wants to do dressage that it will take time (i.e. Months) to get some nice balanced gaits and not to worry about 'head carriage' so early in his training. I guess we'll see what the outcome is. Since I am not the horses trainer I didn't say much more than that.
         
        05-09-2010, 11:31 PM
      #4
    Weanling
    I can see where that would be a tricky situation. If you are still learning other things that interest you and seem to work then I guess stick around and take advantage of the positive things you are gaining. You take some things, put them in your pocket, and you can throw away the unwanted pieces. If that makes sense.
    If you find that your methods truly clash and you find yourself saying to yourself more times than not, "I wouldn't do it this way," then perhaps you should look for a different opportunity.
    You could also share your explorations with this trainer and communicate how well you thought a certain method you've used has worked. Share your thoughts and experiences. You never know, he might be impressed that you're exploring on your own and finding what works for that horse. You might open his eye on a few things and he might just be grateful. :)
         
        05-10-2010, 12:57 AM
      #5
    Trained
    It's not a tricky situation at all. If you were hired to work UNDER the other trainer then you do as he/she says. Don't go to the owner and discuss things and don't talk to the BO behind the trainers back. Go to him/her and ask if you can do it differently and if the answer is no then quit or do it like you were told.
         
        05-10-2010, 04:25 AM
      #6
    Started
    It's true. That's the tough part of training under someone else..
         
        05-10-2010, 08:41 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    It's not a tricky situation at all. If you were hired to work UNDER the other trainer then you do as he/she says. Don't go to the owner and discuss things and don't talk to the BO behind the trainers back. Go to him/her and ask if you can do it differently and if the answer is no then quit or do it like you were told.
    Couldn't have said it better. If you are that differing in opinion, you need to find a different trainer to work under.
         
        05-10-2010, 08:46 AM
      #8
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    It's not a tricky situation at all. If you were hired to work UNDER the other trainer then you do as he/she says. Don't go to the owner and discuss things and don't talk to the BO behind the trainers back. Go to him/her and ask if you can do it differently and if the answer is no then quit or do it like you were told.
    True. Luckily for me I was not hired to work UNDER the trainer, I was hired to help break the horses for English/dressage as this is not the trainer's area (by their own admission). Just wasn't sure how quickly to start changing methods. Given that information, what would you say?


    And I would never talk to the owner behind the trainer's back as I am not that kind of person. The trainer had asked me to be there when the owner came to see the horse so I could ride the horse for them and then talk to the owner about dressage prospects.
         
        05-10-2010, 09:39 AM
      #9
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sarahver    

    And I would never talk to the owner behind the trainer's back as I am not that kind of person. The trainer had asked me to be there when the owner came to see the horse so I could ride the horse for them and then talk to the owner about dressage prospects.
    All horses start basic training the very same way. Where they will go down the road depends on how well suited they are mentally and physically for the desired objective. Not which saddle was put on their back first.

    The finesse of the discipline starts quite a ways down the road.

    And yes I do start (I don't break) horses.
         
        05-10-2010, 12:32 PM
      #10
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    All horses start basic training the very same way.
    Wrong.

    There are many many many ways to start (or break) a horse.

    Everyone has different goals, opinions, and abilities. This goes for Trainers and Owners.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    OLD METHODS vs NEW METHODS brittany Horse Training 16 06-02-2011 03:47 PM
    Amish Training Methods & Management Programs luvmyperch Draft Horses 11 11-12-2009 10:35 AM
    George Morris Training/ Riding Methods XxXequinegrlXxX English Riding 55 09-14-2009 05:43 PM
    Training methods G and K's Mom Horse Training 6 08-22-2008 02:31 PM
    What do you think about Clinton Andersons Training Methods hackin'around Horse Training 12 02-25-2008 09:02 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:27 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0