What if they don't care?
   

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What if they don't care?

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        06-23-2011, 01:56 AM
      #1
    Foal
    What if they don't care?

    So... I can walk, trot, lope, smack the saddle, flap the stirrups and haven't, since day one got any sort of a reaction from the colt I'm working. Saddle doesn't bother him at all.

    I'm scared to hop on because there hasn't been any trying, testing, or an explosion.

    What have you experienced? Anyone just ever had a horse born broke?
         
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        06-23-2011, 02:22 AM
      #2
    Weanling
    If your saddle has dees you can tie weird and strange things to them like bags or bottles then walk trot lope to try get a reaction and sort through it. If you do that safely and only untie whatever you put on the saddle when the horse is standing still and relaxed then any horse will be better broke for it.
         
        06-23-2011, 02:50 AM
      #3
    Showing
    Please don't tie "scary" things fast to your saddle.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-23-2011, 03:43 AM
      #4
    Weanling
    If humans didn't tie "scary" (i never used that word in my first post but I will now) things to a horse, we'd all be riding bareback with no reins. I've nothing against that but I doubt it's how the OP wants to ride.
         
        06-23-2011, 07:04 AM
      #5
    Banned
    PaintMom,

    Actually, that's the way it's supposed to go. If there's an explosion, it means you've gone too far too fast. The goal of kind, intelligent training is to gradually introduce new things to the horse and increase acceptance, not to provoke resistance or a reaction.

    If your colt understands voice commands, walk/trot/canters on the the lunge, gives to the bit directly and laterally and accepts being handled all over, you COULD actually just hop on.

    What I would suggest as an intermediate step is to work in a stall, preferably with a good handler at his head. Put a foot in the stirrup and hang on the saddle like the worst beginner. Huff and puff and hop with your foot in the stirrup. Pet and praise if he stands quietly. Increase the leaning and weight on the colt's back until you can put your belly over the saddle and hang there. Have your handler lead him around the stall with you bellied over.

    Wiggle around in the belly over position. Touch him all over from this position. When he's calm and accepting, wiggle your left foot into the stirrup and swing over, a little at a time. Be prepared for a little flinch or spook as your right leg crosses over his back, that's okay and to be expected. Pet and praise.

    Once you're sitting on him, lay all over him. Hug him around the neck, lean back and pat his croup and rump, touch him every place you can reach. Flap the stirrups, move your legs. Carefully move your arms around, watching his ears for reactions. Progress to waving your arms around. Scootch your seat around in the saddle. Pet and praise when he stands quietly and looks at you like you're crazy.

    If all this goes well, ride him in the stall. Close your legs and chirp or cluck, and ask him to walk and halt. Turn him around using a big leading rein and walk and halt in the other direction.

    Do this a couple of times until you feel comfortable doing it in the round pen or ring. And you're one your way to a trained horse.
         
        06-23-2011, 07:53 AM
      #6
    Trained
    Maura-this sounds great, all except the "in the stall" part. Most stalls I have ever been in are too low to get on a horse safely, and leave very little room for error. They also typically have things like lights on the ceiling, making it even worse. I would suggest the same thing, but perhaps in a round pen. Slowly, and a little at a time.
         
        06-23-2011, 09:45 AM
      #7
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by franknbeans    
    Maura-this sounds great, all except the "in the stall" part. Most stalls I have ever been in are too low to get on a horse safely, and leave very little room for error. They also typically have things like lights on the ceiling, making it even worse. I would suggest the same thing, but perhaps in a round pen. Slowly, and a little at a time.
    I agree. In a stall would make me very nervous. If they were to decide that's when they were going to have their first blow-up it could potentially be a very dangerous situation. I personally don't even do first rides in a round pen, if they are going to blow I want them to have the room to work through it & if I'm going to eat dirt I want to be free of walls, panels, etc. Bumps & bruises hurt more & last longer now than they used to lol!

    I do agree with everything else Maura said. That is the goal with training, do it slow & right and the problems (blow-ups) are much less likely to happen. Generally speaking, I've found that the ones who are started right & handle everything in stride wait until that first canter to do anything silly. Even then most of the time it's not out of an "I can be bad & you're going to eat dirt" place but more of "OH, what the heck am I supposed to do with my legs while you are on me? Crow hop! OOh, that was fun, I didn't know I could do that!" Sounds like you are on the right track to a well broke horse, good luck!
         
        06-23-2011, 09:56 AM
      #8
    Banned
    Sorry, guys, I spent a lot of time breaking horses for the track, and getting on them in the stall was pretty standard. We usually had a stall specifically for this purpose, with buckets and fixtures removed. A round pen is a perfectly reasonable alternative.
         
        06-23-2011, 11:38 AM
      #9
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by christopher    
    if humans didn't tie "scary" (i never used that word in my first post but I will now) things to a horse, we'd all be riding bareback with no reins. I've nothing against that but I doubt it's how the OP wants to ride.
    I hate seeing "scary" things tied fast to a young horse. Seen it go wrong in a real hurry a couple of times. There is a way to desensitize, and just tying things to a saddle to try and spook them is, IMO, dangerous. I'm all for desensitization. But work up to things on the saddle, and then work up to things flapping on the saddle while the horse is working.
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        06-23-2011, 12:24 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    Answering your question I have had 3 I had to train that werent saddle broke none of them bucked bolted reared or anything did have an arab gelding who bit my pants leg that's the most reaction I have had.
         

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