What should a 2 year old know? & When to start? - Page 2
 
 

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What should a 2 year old know? & When to start?

This is a discussion on What should a 2 year old know? & When to start? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What should a 1 year old colt know

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    03-07-2013, 06:05 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffrmcoy    
Her age is vet confirmed. When her previous owners told me she was 2 I didn't believe it at all. The people I got her from didn't give her the proper nutrition or care she needed for proper growth. Her registration papers say she was foaled February 10, 2011.


Annanoel you have one handsome fellow!
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WOW, she is tiny then. Thank you! He's my heart horse. I had a colt like that a while ago. He was about her size and I did NOT believe he was three, turns out he was! Lost his mom early on and the owners didn't know how to properly care for a young horse. He is pony size now, and his parents were both over 15H.

Congrats to you though on such a beautiful girl! (: I couldn't agree more with Missy May! ALWAYS end on a positive note and keep the sessions in short intervals and repeat. If you end on a bad note, nothing is retained and this a lot of times is where bad habits come from. When she has a breakthrough reward her, keep it short. Then attempt again later! They are young, and need activities for their age. DH has this problem ending positive with his colt, they're both very stubborn and trying to convince BOTH to end positive can be a chore. ;)
     
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    03-08-2013, 02:47 AM
  #12
Yearling
Just so you know, all horse develop at about the same rate. Regardless of size or breed. Arabs are just smaller, and more fined boned then other breeds. But she will still develop the same as a QH or a TB. I would wait until she is about 4 or so. I wouldn't go past 5 personally. Even 3 would probably be ok, just for a few short rides. And then turned out in the winter, and put back into training at 4.
ponypile likes this.
     
    03-08-2013, 11:30 AM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
DH has this problem ending positive with his colt, they're both very stubborn and trying to convince BOTH to end positive can be a chore. ;)
Now, now.
     
    03-08-2013, 11:57 AM
  #14
Green Broke
Army wife, not true. I've watched different horses develope at different rates. One thoroughbred gelding looked like a long yearling at 2.5(and X-rays showed his knees hasn't closed) but at 3 he had grown a full hand and looked gorgeous. His full sister had completely closed knees at 2.

Many studies have proved different horses have different maturation rates.

On top of that, a horses spine hasn't fused until 5-6. There are two mares on the farm with back problems, both of which were started at 2, and raced at 2. Coincidence?
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    03-08-2013, 12:32 PM
  #15
Trained
I think there is a pretty wide range to the time required to reach "full maturity", as defined by skeletal completion - per individual horse - as most anyone that has had a lot of babies has observed. Some are amazingly slow to reach full height, while others don't add so much as a cm after their 2nd birthday.
     
    03-11-2013, 04:26 AM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSpark    
Army wife, not true. I've watched different horses develope at different rates. One thoroughbred gelding looked like a long yearling at 2.5(and X-rays showed his knees hasn't closed) but at 3 he had grown a full hand and looked gorgeous. His full sister had completely closed knees at 2.

Many studies have proved different horses have different maturation rates.

On top of that, a horses spine hasn't fused until 5-6. There are two mares on the farm with back problems, both of which were started at 2, and raced at 2. Coincidence?
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Where did you see those studies at? Because I've seen studies supporting what I said, which is why I said it. Also, I said at ABOUT the same rate, I consider a 6 month window acceptable. I only brought up this point because a lot of people (I used to) believe that arabs mature much slower then other breeds. It's not true. And yes, your right about their backs maturing between 5-6. If you can show me the study your talking about, I'd love to read it. I like to learn new things all the time :)


An Article on Starting Young Horses
     
    03-11-2013, 04:37 AM
  #17
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
I agree she needs some more time to grow before she gets started under saddle.
Other than that I expect my youngsters to be able to cope with everything a ridden horse does while at the same time allowing them enough time to relax and not get sour and bored by too much pressure
I wouldnt over do the lunge work at this stage - its enough that they just know what the verbal commands are all about so keep it short and sweet.

If that youngster can walk on a lead, have her hooves picked up I would leave it at that and turn away until more grown.
     
    08-11-2013, 12:13 PM
  #18
Foal
Arabians tend to mature at a much slower rate then any other breed. They typically don't reach maturity til age 6. I use to breed Arabs and we wouldn't start under saddle til age 4 or you can end up with a sway back. You can start ground work and getting her use to a saddle but I wouldn't recommend putting a human on her for a couple more years. It makes me cringe when I see ads for broke 2 year old arabians.
     
    08-11-2013, 12:27 PM
  #19
Showing
Oh, the poor darling. So glad to hear that you're going to wait until she has physically matured before starting her under saddle. She looks like an absolute sweetie.

The good news is, it's never too late to start a horse. A few years ago, I started an 11 year old mare that had never been ridden and she did fine.

Try not to overdo, especially with the circles. Keep the lunging sessions short and sweet. At this point, I'd probably even wait another year before teaching her to ground drive. I'd make sure she led well, stood well for the farrier, was calm about being touched and rubbed everywhere (udders included) and, when it gets warm enough, teach her to stand for bathing. Other than that, turn her out with a herd so that she can grow and mature in a natural-ish herd environment.

The more land you can turn her out on, the better.
     

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