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Whats your opinion?

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        05-04-2007, 07:25 PM
      #11
    Foal
    I think it depends very much on the horse and environment around you.
    A good example is with biting where any number of situations could lead to this occuring.
    For example some horses may bite when they are a little bored or feel ignored (very easy to go off into your own world when leading in hand in a beginner's lesson trust me!) and actually enjoy the reaction they cause as it is quite interesting even if they do get bopped! In this case it is our duty to firstly realise the cause, ignore the actual biting and then try to remove the cause by making the activity more fun for the horse.
    However, in the case of a horse trying to assert dominance over you then a bop on the nose/shout or strong body language reaction is very important for obvious reasons.

    On a bit of a side I have been toying with the idea of doing the equivalent of clicker training with horses although I'm not sure if it would work? Say for example you were teaching a horse the foot aid for trot then you could reward the horse with a small treat (being careful not to give too much of course) everytime he responded in the correct manner. In this way the horse will build a positive image around trotting rather than the 'oh no I have to work!!!' image. What do you think?
         
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        05-10-2007, 03:55 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Oh boy, if my horse bit me he would be disciplined but good and I don't care if he/she was "playing" or not. These are NOT children. (human) You can NOT reason with them. Watch herd dynamics. They don't play around when disciplining! If my horse was to do a large transgression (such as biting) they would get a pretty good pop on the nose and I would become the crazy lady screaming and waving my arms. Believe me, their feet would move. The yelling and moving of arms should last 10-15 seconds. The trick is to move the feet. In a herd the one who can get the others feet to move is the boss, (or at least higher in the pecking order.)

    Small transgressions will start with a voice growl. Most likely a "stop it!" If it continues, (as in immediately continues, not the next day continues) then the discipline gets stronger until he/she stops the behavior. (like CA says as easy as possible, as strong as necessary)(I'm paraphrasing here)

    I have to disagree with Dave here. It shouldn't matter if the horse is bored, young, whatever. There are some transgressions that should NOT be tolerated. I can feed any of my horses (I have 23) by hand and they WILL NOT bite me. (or anyone else)

    I do believe in positive bonding. I also believe in positive reinforcement. BUT, not with dangerous behavior. (that little nip can turn into a dangerous bite real quick if you're not careful) My horses are NOT afraid of me. But they DO respect me.

    If you read what Sparky said,she said, if they try to bite to do this, if they actually bite do that, well, I'm sorry, but it shouldn't get to the actually bite. If they even try, they get the crazy lady and usually don't ever try again.

    If you notice (or re-read) what I said earlier, I am not beating my horses continuely. (or ever) It is mostly in the attitude that you portray. You must have the attitude that you are the boss and expect them to behave accordingly.
    Good Luck.
         
        05-10-2007, 05:31 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    I have to disagree with Dave here. It shouldn't matter if the horse is bored, young, whatever. There are some transgressions that should NOT be tolerated. I can feed any of my horses (I have 23) by hand and they WILL NOT bite me. (or anyone else)
    I think it does very much matter as a horse can very quickly find entertainment in a reaction if it is not receiving any other stimulus. Sure, discipline does have it's place in many cases; however, I'm concerned that if you bop a bored horse it will only be encouraged to repeat the behaviour to get more attention which will only make the problem worse.
    You may also risk losing a certain amount of bonding between horse and human if you discipline at the wrong times. To a horse if they get hit or shouted at when they are simply interested in something you are wearing or simply what re-assurance then they may very quickly lose trust in you. I don't think there can really be any hard and fast rule over this really; it is situational.
         
        05-11-2007, 10:15 AM
      #14
    Foal
    I always use voice first, and if they keep pushing, and keep doing it I would use some sort of punishment, usually all I have to say is "oi" or "hey" or "no" or something, and they know.

    I think voice should always be the first thing, but if they keep being naughty, the worst thing you can do is let the get away with it.

    With tapping on the noce leads to head-shyness, its bull crap, you should never hit your horse so hard that its scared of you, its just a warning to tell them its not allowed.
         
        05-11-2007, 12:04 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Depends on situation. Mostly voice, but if it doesn't help much than hands. Sometimes they just so overexcited about something (opportunity to play etc.) that just don't even pay much attention on voice. Lol!
         
        05-11-2007, 12:41 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TxHorseMom
    Oh boy, if my horse bit me he would be disciplined but good and I don't care if he/she was "playing" or not. These are NOT children. (human) You can NOT reason with them. Watch herd dynamics. They don't play around when disciplining! If my horse was to do a large transgression (such as biting) they would get a pretty good pop on the nose and I would become the crazy lady screaming and waving my arms. Believe me, their feet would move. The yelling and moving of arms should last 10-15 seconds. The trick is to move the feet. In a herd the one who can get the others feet to move is the boss, (or at least higher in the pecking order.)

    Small transgressions will start with a voice growl. Most likely a "stop it!" If it continues, (as in immediately continues, not the next day continues) then the discipline gets stronger until he/she stops the behavior. (like CA says as easy as possible, as strong as necessary)(I'm paraphrasing here)

    I have to disagree with Dave here. It shouldn't matter if the horse is bored, young, whatever. There are some transgressions that should NOT be tolerated. I can feed any of my horses (I have 23) by hand and they WILL NOT bite me. (or anyone else)

    I do believe in positive bonding. I also believe in positive reinforcement. BUT, not with dangerous behavior. (that little nip can turn into a dangerous bite real quick if you're not careful) My horses are NOT afraid of me. But they DO respect me.

    If you read what Sparky said,she said, if they try to bite to do this, if they actually bite do that, well, I'm sorry, but it shouldn't get to the actually bite. If they even try, they get the crazy lady and usually don't ever try again.

    If you notice (or re-read) what I said earlier, I am not beating my horses continuely. (or ever) It is mostly in the attitude that you portray. You must have the attitude that you are the boss and expect them to behave accordingly.
    Good Luck.
    I totally agree.
         
        05-19-2007, 05:52 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dave Singleton
    Quote:
    I have to disagree with Dave here. It shouldn't matter if the horse is bored, young, whatever. There are some transgressions that should NOT be tolerated. I can feed any of my horses (I have 23) by hand and they WILL NOT bite me. (or anyone else)
    I think it does very much matter as a horse can very quickly find entertainment in a reaction if it is not receiving any other stimulus. Sure, discipline does have it's place in many cases; however, I'm concerned that if you bop a bored horse it will only be encouraged to repeat the behaviour to get more attention which will only make the problem worse.
    You may also risk losing a certain amount of bonding between horse and human if you discipline at the wrong times. To a horse if they get hit or shouted at when they are simply interested in something you are wearing or simply what re-assurance then they may very quickly lose trust in you. I don't think there can really be any hard and fast rule over this really; it is situational.
    Do you really think that another horse in a herd situation will care if the other horse is "just bored"? I don't think so. An ADULT horse should know better than biting me if he is interested! He can snuffle, snort, nose around me, but teeth? Nope. And yes, I will "bop" a young horse for biting too. (not as hard, usually with 2 fingers) Yes, they are curious and learning, but if he tried to bite another horse for no reason, he would be disciplined by that horse. And I certainly have never heard of a horse wanting reassurance by biting someone/something. It's not like I go around beating, yelling, or going crazy on my horses all the time. I said for a MAJOR transgression they would get that treatment. (and IMO biting is a major transgression, just like trying to kick me would be.) I wish you could come out to our ranch and see how bonded to our horses we are. But it takes respect to truly bond. And if they don't respect me, and see me as leader, we can't have the bonds that we have.
         
        05-19-2007, 05:37 PM
      #18
    Foal
    I give my horse a big "No" or "Owww!" and a smack on the shoulders or a tap on the nose. I find that works best...she hasn't bitten in a while, and she certainly isn't head shy.
         
        05-25-2007, 09:58 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    I would slap the horse on the neck and squeal at him(or her). That's what they do out in the pasture and it tells them that they are being too rough.I wouldn't slap too hard, just hard enough to feel like a punishment. This also depends on how sensitive your horse is too.
         
        05-26-2007, 09:28 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Normal when a horse bits me I will either jab my thumb into there nose slightly or what I do most of the times is give then a hit on the shoulder or there neck and say ahhh!! For me I don't think biting is a good thing at all even if its a play bit because that can turn narky.
    But I wont hit my horses unless I think it is really nesccasery but even then I don't like doing it but I have to show that I am boss when it comes to them....lucky I don't have this problem anymore my filly has passed her bitting stage lol and my old boy....well he doesnt even have teeth to bit lol
         

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