What's your training timeline?
   

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What's your training timeline?

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    11-28-2011, 02:26 PM
  #1
Weanling
What's your training timeline?

I feel the title says it all, but for clarification:

I'm training my horse myself and he works under saddle as well as on the ground. For those of you who have trained horses before, what is your process in training your horses? Especially once they can walk, trot, and canter.
     
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    11-28-2011, 02:35 PM
  #2
Green Broke
It depends on the day entirely.
I ride 6 days a week and lunge once, occassionally she'll get a free lunge so she can work off those back muscles, have a buck and a fart and a good ol' roll.

It depends on age, level and fitness of your horse. At the moment with Duffy, we're working on making her walk and trot forward, keeping the rythm when doing serpentines and 10m circles, walk trot transitions, canter is a big thing when we can, I normally only canter 3 times a week at the moment as I don't have enough room with so many people in there (our cantering looks like a car crash aha) and we're working on figure 8's, changing over X in a trot.

Oh, and flexing to the inside and long and low :)

Once that's established, and her balance is better, leg yielding, rein back, shoulder in and more lateral movements included :) Hopefully pole work and caveletti soon!
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    11-28-2011, 03:03 PM
  #3
Trained
Depends on the age and ability of the horse. When they are 4 and can w/t/c I expect them to be doing transitions up and down one gait, forward and back and starting shoulder fore and leg yields as well as being in a good rhythm, relaxed and working towards the contact. A 5 year old will be doing trot-halt- trot and walk-canter-walk, lateral work and starting to define collected, working and medium paces. They should clearly be maintaining a contact and responding to half halts by clearly rebalancing.

For all horses I take it day by day and never punish a mistake always just correcting.
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    11-28-2011, 03:05 PM
  #4
Weanling
Definitely depends on the day. Some days we can do pretty circles and prep work for good lope departs and simple lead changes, some days we barely get past a walk. Some horses are more consistent than others, but all horses have good days and off days just like us. The real key is to know when both you and your horse are having a bad day, because at that point nothing seems to work and you both get frustrated and stressed. When you recognize those days as they start to unfold, you and your horse may end on a much better note with each other if you take a day off. On the flip side, there can be amazing days where you both feel like you can ride on forever! It's a balancing act at times but always worth it. :)
     
    11-28-2011, 04:35 PM
  #5
mls
Trained
Another 'depends' vote here.

However, I will add - determine what your likely end goal is with your horse. What does your horse need to be really 'good' for the goal? Barrels or poles - need a really nice turn. Trails - need to be exposed to tons of 'stuff'. Some events need an instant 'go', some need a solid right NOW stop.

Then work on those goals. Do the routine w/t/c, stop, back, etc. Then add an element - side pass, turn on the hind quarters, roll back and so on!
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    11-28-2011, 06:17 PM
  #6
Weanling
Thanks for your input guys!

I've been reading up on stuff and feel like I really haven't gotten all of Shamrock's foundation "covered". I read an article about where a horse should be in his training at certain ages and, considering he's 6 & I've had to re-train him, I couldn't help but feel discouraged.

It also talked about this 6 tier training scale that he should know -
1) Rhythm
2) Suppleness
3) Contact
4) Impulsion
5) Straightness
6) Collection

But I don't know if he has ANY of that. :/ I just know that I've taught him to walk, trot, canter and as of today we started working on him responding to the lightest leg aids possible and moving really forward.

I don't take lessons right now, it's not really an option, and I just want Shamrock to be the best horse he can be.

Any suggestions?
     
    11-29-2011, 03:13 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkgamble    
Thanks for your input guys!

I've been reading up on stuff and feel like I really haven't gotten all of Shamrock's foundation "covered". I read an article about where a horse should be in his training at certain ages and, considering he's 6 & I've had to re-train him, I couldn't help but feel discouraged.

It also talked about this 6 tier training scale that he should know -
1) Rhythm
2) Suppleness
3) Contact
4) Impulsion
5) Straightness
6) Collection

But I don't know if he has ANY of that. :/ I just know that I've taught him to walk, trot, canter and as of today we started working on him responding to the lightest leg aids possible and moving really forward.

I don't take lessons right now, it's not really an option, and I just want Shamrock to be the best horse he can be.

Any suggestions?

Pfft, my mare is six, I rode her like I had to teach her from scrap, she had the basics, could barely canter under saddle due to lack of muscle and balance and now we're getting there. What about broodmares that have foals for the first 10years then get brought in to work? It may be the 'ideal' but its just the same as the 'ideal' confirmation etc- unless you're riding all the way to the top it doesn't matter that much.

Best thing you can do for yourself if you have no trainer, and I remember saying you don't live in a horsey area before, is discipline yourself, watch dvd's, youtube, books, think about your position, get eyes on the ground and someone to film you so you can critique, or post on here so people can help you and work on it.

Think of schooling programmes, is he stiff on one rein? Do more bending excercises on it, try and get him working in a soft outline without tiring too much (this takes time, not oan overnight thing) and working from behind, then start introducing more and more.

It would help if you could let us know what stage he is at, how much work you do with him and film it :)
     
    11-29-2011, 06:11 AM
  #8
Trained
Along with what DuffyDuck said above - bare in mind that these guides for where a horse should be in its training at a certain age, is aimed for riders that have a great deal of skill and experience in achieving these goals. As an amateur rider, you should not be getting caught up in riding by the age. Just ride the horse you have, and work on the training scale at your own pace. Every horse you ride, you will ruin a little less than the last. You have plenty of time, just try your best to do it right and you will learn along the way.

Some horses are not even started until they are 4 year olds, they may not be physically or mentally mature enough to deal with the work load of being under saddle. Others will offer you the world from the get go, and as a rider we need to be exceptionally careful with these types of horses, as they will keep offering more and it is so tempting to ask them for more all the time, and soon they're doing piaffe under saddle as a 3 year old and tempi's at 4. Then at 5 or 6 they have mental or physical breakdown and need to be retired. Such talented, trainable horses ruined because of riders rushing them up the levels.
Just because a horse CAN grand prix at 7, does not mean it SHOULD.
     
    11-29-2011, 08:35 AM
  #9
Weanling
Thanks guys! :) I've learned so much recently, especially since I got Shamrock. All of these new exercises and massaging him, etc. So thanks for ALL of the information. I just keep learning more and more and I love it!

I usually ride alone and I can't really film myself (it's hard enough when I'm on the ground trying to film him while lunging him (see thread: Shamrock Being Silly), but I've talked to my non-horsey boyfriend about how difficult it is for me to tell how Shamrock is doing because some of it is less you can feel it and more you see it, so he's going to go out with me sometimes to film me. :) So look for videos coming soon!
     
    11-30-2011, 10:22 AM
  #10
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkgamble    
Thanks for your input guys!

I've been reading up on stuff and feel like I really haven't gotten all of Shamrock's foundation "covered". I read an article about where a horse should be in his training at certain ages and, considering he's 6 & I've had to re-train him, I couldn't help but feel discouraged.


Any suggestions?
Do not feel discouraged. There is no hard and fast rule as to what a horse has to know by a certain age. I prefer to treat horses as individuals and learn with them.

Guidelines are there to guide - not restrict!
     

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