Where to start??
   

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Where to start??

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  • Where to start with new horse
  • My horse wont let me touch her

 
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    05-09-2011, 05:10 PM
  #1
Foal
Where to start??

Kate.jpg

So here she is, my new horse! She is about 3 years old, a palomino quarter horse. She is very sweet, very calm and laid back for the most part....but has no manners and will not let me touch anything but her nose thus far. She will even eat right from my hand and when I am in the pasture with her, if I go and stand quietly against the fence, she will quietly come and stand right beside me, but will not let me touch her. She greets me at the fence for her feedings and does not seem to be scared of me, just un-trusting I think still, which is understandable since I got her Saturday. So here is my question, where do I start? She has never been handled other than the occasional hand feeding by her previous owner, so she is NOT even halter broke. All of my local go to people seem to have very differing opinions about where to begin so I am curious as to what the general consensus is here. Thanks in advance
     
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    05-09-2011, 05:17 PM
  #2
Started
How much have you worked with horses?

Green and green 99% of the time do not go well together.
     
    05-09-2011, 05:21 PM
  #3
Yearling
Well....for starters timidity will get you nowhere. You really need to be a leader, have rules and set boundaries.

I can't stand horses I have to tip toe around or who will just bowl over me. There was a great thread started about ground work. If your new to working with young horses I would strongly suggest working with an experienced trainer to help you along.

A good place to start would be having the ability to touch her anywhere, get her to pay attention to you and respect your SPACE. Once that's done exposure exposure exposure. Cars, bikes, trucks, four wheelers, sack her out, freaky noises, music, screaming kids :)
     
    05-09-2011, 05:22 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiJumper    
How much have you worked with horses?

Green and green 99% of the time do not go well together.
WELL, we are green and green!
     
    05-09-2011, 05:25 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by patterson81    
WELL, we are green and green!
I would then look into a qualified trainer to help you either work with you and your horse or that you can send your horse to.

Until then, I would just work on handling her, letting her touch you all over, all the while holding a halter over your shoulder or wherever.

That's what I would do.
     
    05-09-2011, 10:35 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
If you have to ask what to do, you are in waaaay over your head.

You need a trainer to either gentle and train her or at the very least, help you through every step. You cannot possibly know how to do what you have never seen or been around. There are 1000 variables -- or more.

If the horse does this, you must do that. If the horse does something else, you must do something different. These are skills that take years of experience to learn. You can do so many things wrong, I would not know where to start. But, I can guarantee that the end result will be a disaster -- a badly spoiled horse and a thoroughly disillusioned owner.

The best thing you can do is go out and buy a gentle, well-trained 'finished' horse that you can learn on and one that will build your confidence. One of you (either horse or rider) needs to know what they are doing.
     
    05-09-2011, 10:41 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
If you have to ask what to do, you are in waaaay over your head.

You need a trainer to either gentle and train her or at the very least, help you through every step. You cannot possibly know how to do what you have never seen or been around. There are 1000 variables -- or more.



If the horse does this, you must do that. If the horse does something else, you must do something different. These are skills that take years of experience to learn. You can do so many things wrong, I would not know where to start. But, I can guarantee that the end result will be a disaster -- a badly spoiled horse and a thoroughly disillusioned owner.

The best thing you can do is go out and buy a gentle, well-trained 'finished' horse that you can learn on and one that will build your confidence. One of you (either horse or rider) needs to know what they are doing.
Well as of a few hours ago, me and my other half have arranged to begin taking lessons this week and are currently looking for a trainer to send her too. For now we are simply feeding her and spending time with her! Thanks all for your input!!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-09-2011, 10:46 PM
  #8
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by patterson81    
Well as of a few hours ago, me and my other half have arranged to begin taking lessons this week and are currently looking for a trainer to send her too. For now we are simply feeding her and spending time with her! Thanks all for your input!!
Posted via Mobile Device
Good luck! I hope you find a great trainer to work with her!

And good job on you both starting to take lessons. :)
     
    05-09-2011, 10:55 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
I feel much better. A horse that has never been handled is no problem for a competent trainer -- they know where to start and know what needs to be done.

Rather than hand feed her, I would go to a farm supply store and buy a 5 foot stock whip. This can be a 5 foot extension of your arm. If you have a stall or a small pen, you can get her used to being 'petted' and 'stroked' with the whip and can start by rubbing it all over her.

You want to remember that when she over-reacts, you cannot back up or stop doing what upset her. You must only 'back off' when she is happy and quiet and OK with what you are doing.

Whatever she is doing when you stop or back up is what you are teaching her to do. So, if she is not gentle enough to pet with your hand, just stroke her with a 5 foot whip until she is OK with it.

For now, that is all I would try to do. Any mistakes you make in gentling her will have to be 'fixed' by a trainer later, so do not try to do things you do not know how to do. It will just start her down the road to being another spoiled horse.
     
    05-09-2011, 10:59 PM
  #10
Yearling
She's very cute. But - I tried to halter break a three year old and nearly lost a few fingers in the progress, and I've got lots of experience with unruly/green horses. Like everyone else said, get yourself a trainer to halter break her and finish her under saddle. If she isn't halter broke and won't even let you around her, she is probably going to be a tough case for even a professional trainer. She's less than green... she's blue and yellow!

Good luck with her. Keep doing what you're doing, just loving on her and trying to get closer. Just be careful!
     

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