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Why does the trainer tie horse's lead line to tail

This is a discussion on Why does the trainer tie horse's lead line to tail within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to use long lead lines in horse bridle training
  • Softening a horse by tying its head to its tail

 
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    03-31-2011, 01:17 PM
  #11
Banned
I honestly think this is a lazy way to teach a horse. And quite frankly I would never do that.
There are better ways and if you don't have time to train a horse properly then you shouldn't be training horses.

I don't see how tying a horse head to the side and leaving him to figure it out is teaching him anything except not to like the bridle, bit or saddle beacuse they think your going to tie their head. Pretty ignorant..
     
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    03-31-2011, 01:42 PM
  #12
Weanling
I think that one good thing has come out of seeing trainers at your barn doing this is that you needn't hire them for anything since they are both lazy and incompetent. There are much better ways, as others point out, to do this and it doesn't take very long for a horse to learn it if you have good or at least decent skills. If you haven't got the time to do it right then you shouldn't do it all.
     
    03-31-2011, 02:38 PM
  #13
Foal
Northern, I'd figure they'd do both sides or yes I think it might cause some uncomfortable neck problems.
     
    03-31-2011, 02:57 PM
  #14
Yearling
Yes it a common practice. Its to soften the horse and teach them to follow there nose. In my opinion its much more realalistic to tie the reins to the saddle.
When I work with a horse that is not soft at all I usually sit there with them so I can release at the right moment.
     
    03-31-2011, 03:39 PM
  #15
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
Did you proponents of this ever consider that the horse's neck gets in a crick on one side, & overstretched on the other, at the least?

It's like doing a yoga posture waay too long - OUCCHH!
That's why watching and timing is so important. It's not like we tie them around and just leave them for hours at a time. We tie them and then watch. When they stop resisting, and they immediately give whenever they contact the bit, then I go and either switch sides or start working on something else like getting them ready to ride. Sometimes it takes just a few minutes to a side and other times it might take as much as a half hour to each side. Usually no more than that and none of the horse's I've ever used this on has shown any ill effects.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckcherry    
I honestly think this is a lazy way to teach a horse. And quite frankly I would never do that.
There are better ways and if you don't have time to train a horse properly then you shouldn't be training horses.

I don't see how tying a horse head to the side and leaving him to figure it out is teaching him anything except not to like the bridle, bit or saddle beacuse they think your going to tie their head. Pretty ignorant..
Wow, offensive much? There is nothing lazy about it. It is a time saver, yes, but that doesn't mean that the trainer is going into the house to sit on their ass and watch TV while the horse is tied like that:roll:. As for "there are better ways"? That's a matter of opinion. I've been training for 10+ years and my Dad (who taught me) has been training for 50+ years. Other than the occasional outlaw horse, I have never had a horse that this method did not work on. It takes the human element out of it so there is no worry about making sure the human has the perfect timing to release pressure at just the right moment.

Not to mention, this isn't an every day thing so there is no risk of the horse becoming scared of the saddle or bridle by associating it with being tied with their neck bent. I'll do it once on each side, maybe twice if the horse is one that needs things repeated in order to learn. After that, it is all reinforced from the saddle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLovedOne    
I think that one good thing has come out of seeing trainers at your barn doing this is that you needn't hire them for anything since they are both lazy and incompetent. There are much better ways, as others point out, to do this and it doesn't take very long for a horse to learn it if you have good or at least decent skills. If you haven't got the time to do it right then you shouldn't do it all.
How long have you been a trainer? How many horses do you ride each day? Have you ever tried this method? Since when is it your place to call someone lazy and incompetent? As for "better ways" and "doing it right", that's a matter of opinion again. I'll take my personal experience over your preaching any day and my experience tells me that this method is effective and efficient. You don't agree with it, fine, but be careful about throwing a hissy fit and spouting words like 'incompetent' or 'lazy' about people you don't know.
     
    03-31-2011, 03:52 PM
  #16
Weanling
I don't think this is a bad way of training depending on the horse and the situation entirely...so please excuse my ignorance when I ask this...

Why do people HAVE to soften a horse's mouth to a bit? I've trained two fillies, and all I did was just stick the bit in their mouth and they knew what to do from there...granted, there was ALOT of ground work with leading exercises, and they may have been just two exceptional horses...but am I wrong to say that a horse that needs this type of training just hasn't been trained to give in the halter enough? I could be, so please don't be offended anyone, I'm honestly asking...
     
    03-31-2011, 04:01 PM
  #17
Showing
Nothing offensive about asking SA. There are some horses that are good natured enough and mellow enough that they don't require much prep work to learn how to give to the bit. On the other hand, I get a lot of horses that are not so much as halter broke when they come to me and most of them are snorty and extremely reactive. By having them supple to lateral flexion before I ever get on, that greatly minimizes the risk of me getting hurt. Once you have a bit of handle on their head, that will usually take away a lot of their ability to unseat you. If they go to buck, you can take their head to the side and that takes away much of their power, if they spook and go to bolt or run off, you can get them shut down a lot quicker because they learn to follow their nose before they ever set foot out of the roundpen and you can effectively get them into a circle or a one rein stop.
     
    03-31-2011, 04:12 PM
  #18
Weanling
Gracias :)
     
    03-31-2011, 04:18 PM
  #19
Trained
Bahahahaa! Smrobs, lazy and incompetent? That's a good one.

It's a tool, just like every other technique for horses out there, that just needs to be used correctly and not abused. Bending for thirty minutes never killed a horse. Just saying. =]
     
    03-31-2011, 04:26 PM
  #20
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckcherry    
I honestly think this is a lazy way to teach a horse. And quite frankly I would never do that.
There are better ways and if you don't have time to train a horse properly then you shouldn't be training horses.
I agree. Lazy and dangerous. I don't care if it's to the tail, the saddle or any other equipment.

Pulling them around on top of you doesn't teach them either. Ride or work the horse. Get them doing something they enjoy and let the head set and give come naturally. It tends to stick with the horse too.
     

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tie head to tail, training method

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